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Debate Info

37
38
Mostly That's silly
Debate Score:75
Arguments:59
Total Votes:77
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 Mostly (26)
 
 That's silly (27)

Debate Creator

MuckaMcCaw(1968) pic



Depressed Atheists are better off talking to other atheists than the religious

And vice versa

Mostly

Side Score: 37
VS.

That's silly

Side Score: 38
6 points

Theism necessarily endorses a worldview critically different from that held by most atheists. While this does not preclude a theist from being helpful to an atheist living with depression, it does create an additional obstacle for navigating an already difficult situation.

Side: Mostly

Perfectly said.

Side: Mostly
1 point

here is why atheists are depressed .... Romans 1:21 .. for even though they knew [about] God .. they did not honor him as God or give thanks .. but they became futile in their speculations .. and their foolish heart was darkened .... here is how one escapes this heartless trap .... http://www.gty.org/products/Audio-Series/201_The-Beatitudes ... enjoy

Side: Mostly
2 points

Atheists dont believe in God. ,

Side: That's silly
CoolDude(67) Disputed Banned
1 point

It depends.... Some Atheists believe in God and some do not. It depends on the person.

Side: That's silly
0 points

If I was headed where atheists are headed ... I'd be depressed too .... eat / drink and be "merry" atheists ... for tomorrow you face an eternal judgement ...... http://www.gty.org/MediaPlayer/sermons/66-77 ... enjoy

Side: Mostly
SecuritronX(106) Disputed
5 points

"If I was headed where atheists are headed ... I'd be depressed too"

Only if you believed it to be true. If you had no reason to believe a visit to Hell was likely to be on a future itinerary, I doubt it would trouble you much.

A depressed atheist is probably more troubled by ostracization than by the ramifications a mythological realm may or may not hold.

Side: Mostly
MuckaMcCaw(1968) Disputed
4 points

^^^ Case in point, this ignorant jackass.

Side: That's silly
DrawFour(2662) Clarified
1 point

Troll. Trust me. As far as religious people go, that troll isn't even trying to hide their sins.

Judgement in every line that troll speaks.

Side: Mostly
Warjin(1577) Disputed
4 points

I'm going to HEEELLLL Whoohoo, at least I wont be around bigots!

Side: That's silly
DrawFour(2662) Clarified
3 points

I'm sure their are some bigots in hell.

Side: Mostly
3 points

Why shouldn't depressed atheists talk to the religious? I don't see what's wrong with that.

Side: That's silly
MuckaMcCaw(1968) Clarified
3 points

Highly religious/spiritual people think in very different ways from non-spiritual folk. This has been demonstrated in numerous studies. The religious mindset can be described as more intuitive and feeling while the non-religious are more likely to favor rationalism and logic. There are exceptions, so my premise isn't meant to be taken as true for ALL religious and non-religious folk, just a significant majority.

Now, I may have my own opinions about which way of thinking is better, however that's not my point here.

The reason is because depression is a very personal and diverse disease. If you want to really help someone with depression, you need to able to understand their thought processes and explain things in a way that easily makes sense to them. Also, since the two approaches are so different, its easy to unwittingly set off the depressed person's defenses, and then they may not even let you try to help them again.

I, being a rationalist and pretty knowledgeable about the science behind depression, look at it as a physical disease. I know that what is happening to me is an imbalance of chemicals, and I know that when those chemical reserves are depleted, there are certain things I either cannot or will not do.

But I've found that my approach does not appear to make sense to the religious people that attempt to offer me support. And their answers don't make sense to me. Their answer are intuitive. Things you can't describe how to do, but just do. Like "choose to be happy", "don't dwell in the dark stuff". These answers are well meaning, but if these were things I could do naturally, I would have done it by now.

On the other hand, if I try offer advice to a highly religious person, I might come off as cold or dismissive. They probably need to be appealed to in a more emotional, intuitive way then I can provide. The probably want to hear about what they can do for their soul. And I can't answer that because I don't believe in souls.

So for all concerned, I think atheists are going to have better luck helping depressed atheists, and Spiritual people are better off hand depressed spiritual people.

Side: Mostly
CoolDude(67) Disputed Banned
1 point

non-religious are more likely to favor rationalism and logic.

If they were rational they would believe that the Earth is 6,000 years old and was created in 6 literal days as the Bible says. Also, we know the bible is true based on 2 Timothy 3:16

Side: Mostly
1 point

I think this is a case where you misinterpret some kind of enemy. It isn't anything to do with thinking each other is wrong. If someone, anyone, came to you personally and said they were depressed, what would you say to comfort them? I think you would be a good Christian to ask because I think you would try to help.

I think people assume God would be brought up as a way to be happier.

Side: That's silly
2 points

I don't see why atheists can't seek help from religious people.. Sure religious people believe atheists are going to Hell, but that doesn't matter. Their problem doesn't have to be your religion vs. theirs. This is really silly mainly because people can't accept other people as they are. This is practically like whites hating black or any race hating any other race because they are different. Whether there be a Hell or Heaven or there being no existence, there is no point in not helping someone because of their religious perspective. If a religious person were depressed and an atheist were to reject helping that religious person, the religious person would only call them selfish and probably an arrogant atheists. That's how atheists feel if they are rejected the help they desire to rid their depression.

Side: That's silly
MuckaMcCaw(1968) Disputed
1 point

I brought this all up as a depressed person who has talked extensively with atheists, theists and medical/psychiatric professionals on the subject. I have sought out comfort from a number of religious individuals from multiple religions and have invariably found the conversations to be less than helpful. I believe the reason for this has to do with a) a massive difference in perspective and b) the belief in souls.

For the remainder of my response I am going to repost one of my responses above, simply because it covers all my points succinctly and adequately:

Highly religious/spiritual people think in very different ways from non-spiritual folk. This has been demonstrated in numerous studies. The religious mindset can be described as more intuitive and feeling while the non-religious are more likely to favor rationalism and logic. There are exceptions, so my premise isn't meant to be taken as true for ALL religious and non-religious folk, just a significant majority.

Now, I may have my own opinions about which way of thinking is better, however that's not my point here.

The reason is because depression is a very personal and diverse disease. If you want to really help someone with depression, you need to able to understand their thought processes and explain things in a way that easily makes sense to them. Also, since the two approaches are so different, its easy to unwittingly set off the depressed person's defenses, and then they may not even let you try to help them again.

I, being a rationalist and pretty knowledgeable about the science behind depression, look at it as a physical disease. I know that what is happening to me is an imbalance of chemicals, and I know that when those chemical reserves are depleted, there are certain things I either cannot or will not do.

But I've found that my approach does not appear to make sense to the religious people that attempt to offer me support. And their answers don't make sense to me. Their answer are intuitive. Things you can't describe how to do, but just do. Like "choose to be happy", "don't dwell in the dark stuff". These answers are well meaning, but if these were things I could do naturally, I would have done it by now.

On the other hand, if I try offer advice to a highly religious person, I might come off as cold or dismissive. They probably need to be appealed to in a more emotional, intuitive way then I can provide. The probably want to hear about what they can do for their soul. And I can't answer that because I don't believe in souls.

So for all concerned, I think atheists are going to have better luck helping depressed atheists, and Spiritual people are better off hand depressed spiritual people.

Side: Mostly
1 point

I brought this all up as a depressed person who has talked extensively with atheists, theists and medical/psychiatric professionals on the subject.

Just a hopeful thought. Have you tried finding someone who needs help even more that you do? The positive feedback from helping someone even with a "random act of kindness" can be instantly gratifying, ego building, and fun.

Side: Mostly
1 point

I disagree, Christianity is more than capable of competing in the marketplace of ideas. We are actually obligated to share our point of view.

Side: That's silly
MuckaMcCaw(1968) Disputed
1 point

Let me ask you this:

Assume somebody comes to you and asks for help regarding their depression.

What kinds of advice are you likely to give them? What sort of assumptions might you make about them or their illness, if any? What would you think is their best bet?

Conversely: If YOU were suffering from depression, what do you think would be some of the best advice you could receive? What would help you keep your chin up? Etc.

Side: Mostly
AngryGenX(463) Disputed
1 point

That would depend a whole lot on circumstances. There are a lot of situations in life where the bible can offer some guidance, but that also depends on how spiritual the person is. On the other hand, I am neither a religious leader or a psychologist. If they are going through something I can't understand I would have to recommend they seek help elsewhere.

Interested to see where you are going with this.

Side: That's silly
1 point

While I think that there could absolutely be negative consequenses of athiests talking to religious people, I also think there are many positive consequenses. In life it is necessary to take the risk in order to obtain new information and knowledge from other people. I am a Wiccan and personally, I enjoy talking to people who are Athiests, Christians, Muslims, or whomever is willing to converse in a civil manner with an open mind. No one should be excluded from a conversation or discussion based on their religious views. In fact, I believe that the conversation becomes much more interesting when there are many participants with different views. It provides new perspectives and learning opportunities.

Side: That's silly