CreateDebate


Debate Info

162
184
O yes! Hell no!
Debate Score:346
Arguments:147
Total Votes:542
More Stats

Argument Ratio

side graph
 
 O yes! (73)
 
 Hell no! (74)

Debate Creator

mumin(214) pic



Do we continue to exist even when our bodies die?

Life's short

O yes!

Side Score: 162
VS.

Hell no!

Side Score: 184
7 points

Everything that once made up our body still exists, so in a sense, yes. The atoms that made up me will still be around when the world's ended...

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
Mahollinder(897) Disputed
7 points

The question itself seems to render your reply moot, as much as I agree with it. The "we" - the sum of our parts and that little extra that makes us an "I" in relation to others - is non-existent at death, particularly if the sum of our parts and that little extra become separated and interwoven in the fabric of the cosmos.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
Bradf0rd(1422) Disputed
2 points

The question is "Do we continue to exist when our bodies die?". We doesn't imply an "I", it implies a "Me", which is different because "I" implies consciousness. We is a collective Me's, not "I"'s, therefor no consciousness is implied. With that said, you can safely say that we do exist beyond the passing of the conscious part of us. If the material aspect is not good enough for you, there will be memories of us... unlike before birth, so at least we will exist more so than before we were born.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
5 points

When the poster made the dichotomy between "we" and "our bodies" he was clearly referring to self awareness and consciousness. That does not continue to exist after the brain dies unfortunately.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
0 points

1) he was clearly referring to self awareness and consciousness (no I wasn't - I was debating whether death is an end to existence in every sense of the word)

2) That does not continue to exist after the brain dies unfortunately.

(Prove it. Self awareness and consciousness are absolutely personal to the subject. The brain is an organ that helps you process your thoughts, I'd say, rather than being the thought itself. But I apologize, your science box doesn't allow you accept that)

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

That's really nicely packed in a science box for lunch.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
4 points

this is a Buddhist story i found... its made me look at things differently. I wonder if it will do the same for you.

In his dharma talks night after night, one phrase that regularly crops up is "look deeply". Look carefully, Thich Nhat Hanh urges his compatriots, and you will see that the true seeds of happiness are neither wealth, fame, nor glory. Look at your hand, and you will realize how it is composed of your ancestors' veins, motherly love, and the spirit of your children to come. Look deeply, and you will see there is ultimately no birth, no death, no coming, no going.

"After we die, where do we go?" asks the monk during his last talk. A long pause. Thich Nhat Hanh blinks his eyes a few times before he continues. "It's the same as the cloud in the sky. The heat from the sun has transformed water in the river into vapour, which then forms into the clouds. They then return to the earth, to the river _ as rain, snow, or ice.

"The cloud never dies. It just changes _ into falling rain, river, water". The monk proceeds to pour tea into a glass. "And when the poet drinks the tea, the cloud will turn into a poem." He takes a sip, and breaks into a smile. "Isn't that nice? How the cloud can reincarnate into a piece of poetry, or a dharma talk?"

A cloud can never die; a cloud only becomes rain or snow or ice, but a cloud can never be nothing. That is the true nature of the cloud. That is the true nature of all living things. No birth and no death.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
3 points

Thanks for your wonderful contribution. It's a releif that someone can come up with arguments that aren't confined to downright absolutes and can dare to think outside the box.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!

You're not gonna get rid of me that easy ;)

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
3 points

I think the question is, is the "I" even there? Or are we just perceiving an illusion of us having these individual identities?

Anyways, I think when we die, we go off into an infinite, never-ending dream land. It's like how we can dream for 5 earth minutes, but in our dream it feels like forever. Earth time is irrelevent in dream time. This makes me question what is real? (yes, yes, the matrix) Reality or dream? They both feel real.

So basically, I don't know if "I" as an individual entity will continue to exist after my shell decomposes, but I do believe that we will continue to dream forever, with or without our sense of "I."

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

I feel the same sense of direction as you. Only 'dreamland' for you is the afterlife for me. If you meditate upon the (real) meaning in these concepts that religions present (though distorted and ravaged in time by insidiuous dissent), you will find they say the very same thing. For the prophets that said them, were the greatest philosophers of their age, envisioned with divine truths, that people like you and me would take a lifetime (or several lifetimes) to comprehend.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
3 points

I chose to believe in the Christian religion and therefore believe that my soul will live on after my body's physical death. The idea of something as final as death with nothing after is hard for me to wrap my head around. Also, it makes it much harder to cope with other's deaths (as I recently have) if you don't believe in some sort of afterlife. It is comforting to believe that we will be reunited one day. On a side note, sometimes I think about reincarnation.... it would be nice to stay on earth and live as something/someone else to get another perspective on life.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

I believe that we will one day figure out the truth and commune with the everlasting and divine. I think one lifetime's not nearly enough, it just takes so damn long to become human again...

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
3 points

I think we were ALWAYS here and ALWAYS will be here. If we are in fact made of atoms and energy, you cannot create or destroy energy. Energy can only be transferred. The atoms and energy just took millions of years to manifest in to what we call "our consciousness." We were here before we were born. We were in our parents, our grandparents, our ancestors, history, war, monkeys, and dinosaurs. The summation of the past equals the present, so I can only believe that the summation of our present will equal our future. Therefore, we will never cease to exist, only transfered.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
3 points

I think we were ALWAYS here and ALWAYS will be here. If we are in fact made of atoms and energy, you cannot create or destroy energy. Energy can only be transferred. The atoms and energy just took millions of years to manifest in to what we call "our consciousness." We were here before we were born. We were in our parents, our grandparents, our ancestors, history, war, monkeys, and dinosaurs. The summation of the past equals the present, so I can only believe that the summation of our present will equal our future. Therefore, we will never cease to exist, only transfered.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
3 points

yes. doesn't make scence that we have superior brain to everything else. they also say the mind is the greatest computer ever. computers always have users.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
2 points

Aren't there more ways to 'exist' than in the strictest, most conventional sense of the word - of physical interaction with the tangible? Must we confine ourselves to the scientifically proven materialistic world when we say we exist? What if our existence is as real as the characters in this note, that are actually impressions made by electrical impulses, or more so, a representation of the writer’s thoughts, not just characters that get deleted some day? Are we only the characters or are we actually the thought that live on as a memory even when the words have been consumed? Self-awareness is yet another physical aspect that may or may not cease once our ‘being’ loses the breath of life, but may again be irrelevant when you speak of existence – beyond the physical world. I feel this truth within myself, so I know I exist in the physical sense, as well as in a place reserved for me, because of me, because I was meant to be. You don’t have to accept it, you’ll have your chance again, hopefully.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
3 points

The definition of existence: that's the real question here. We exist physically as constructs made of molecules that will never be destroyed, and we also exist as beings that have effects on other people and on our world. The former will continue to exist, the latter, the person, will die and not speak or act in the same way ever again. Will this being live on in a spiritual sense? That's the harder question...

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
2 points

We are defined by the choices we make. Personally, I have faith in my belief that we choose when we are born and when we die (only theory, of course). When a person makes a choice immediately before what we define as 'death', the impact of said choice does not cease to exist. Every choice we make impacts our Existence regardless of the scope of the choice (consider the concept of 'the butterfly effect').

When we choose to move a finger, that movement displaces atoms of air. Each displacement of each atom is a direct impact of the initial choice to move the finger. Choice defines Existence. Every choice by every entity is intentional (I am pleasantly reminded of the band Rush's lyric "if you choose not to decide you still have made a choice").

Being as we are defined by our choices and the impact of those choices do not cease to exist after 'death', YES, we continue to exist after our bodies 'die'.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

I disagree. Beliefs and thought are what impact our choices and those cease when we die. I also disagree over the concept that we are defined by our choices, but that is for some other debate.

Not every choice in intentional so long as you qualify intentional as a conscious or at worst coming for the immediate subconscious. Humans cannot choose to have their heart beat, or choose to not laugh when tickled. These things are involuntary and no amount of conscious "choosing" can stop it.

You finish your argument with a non-sequitur. Though the impact of our choice does live on (figuratively) as a legacy, it does not follow that humans live on, or continue to exist because of that. It only follows that our legacy lives on, not us. You're fallaciously unifying the Essence with the Existential. Such an argument would maintain that Santa exists because his mythological legacy stemming from St. Nicholas continues today. Therefore, the one place we can partially agree is that you tend to base your "theories" on faith.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
ChoiceMad(6) Disputed
1 point

Your flaw in logic is the same as mine--neither of us can successfully prove which came first, choice or impact.

"...so long as you qualify intentional as a conscious..."

Do you contend that the beat of the heart (or other sensations) can not be self-manipulated? Furthermore, who is to say at what point such manipulations become available to us as 'living' beings (I am specifically considering embryos/newborns)?

"You finish your argument with a non-sequitur"

My closing was simply a reiteration of what I inherently stated initially.

"the impact of our choice does live on (figuratively) as a legacy"

You admittedly accept my belief as truth but you stop short--you confine your thoughts to claim that humans do not live on due to impact of choice. You disagree that we are defined by our choices but side-step and state that such a concept is unrelated to the topic. Please explain how my belief in 'Existence being defined by choice' does not directly associate with whether we exist 'beyond the flesh' or not.

You are fallaciously separating Existence from itself. Existence is not apart from anything... everything is Existence. Your analogy (which is extremely considerable but plausible and possible IMO) is a blatant attempt at ridicule due to its immediately extreme nature (as are other particulars of your response). Regardless of how insane my beliefs appear to be to you, do you genuinely believe such behavior is appropriate?

"you tend to base your 'theories' on faith"

Regarding faith/belief--our perception of Existence cannot occur without it. We only exist because we believe that Existence occurs. Perception is theory.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
2 points

The question is actually "does your 'soul' continue to exist after death".

My hypothesis for reincarnation follows:

1). Posit the existence of a soul.

2). Nature wastes nothing. Matter from stars long dead still exists, and is reformed into new and more interesting things (like us). Everything that we know of is recycled into some other form or shape (plants, animals, coal, rocks, etc.).

3). therefore, if a soul exists, it is also recycled into some other form or shape after each life.

4). Therefore, a soul will continue on in some other form after the death of it's host.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
2 points

I sure hope so.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
deepishm(350) Disputed
1 point

hope so???????????????????????

what do you mean......................

4 years ago | Side: Hell no!
2 points

This is the "Ship of Thesus" debate, and while I enjoy CreateDebate, I enjoy the fact that the substance of arguements haven't changed for a million years even better.

I believe we will exist, but as something else...

Follow the link for a good summary of the "Ship of Thesus". (Not my blog.)

Supporting Evidence: Ship of Thesus (www.productiveflourishing.com)
6 years ago | Side: O yes!
2 points

Yes, we still exist in this world, but in the form of memories. The definition of "we" here is not only meant for physical appearance ( such as ghost form or zombies), but the "we" here also stands for the memory that we left deep inside people's heart. That is why the heroes and heroines, such as Nelson Mandela, Abraham Lincoln, and Mao, who had fought for freedom and independence in the past are still remembered until today. The infamous dictators such as Hitler and Stalin are also remembered until today due to their "purge" and cruel dictatorship. Although our physical appearance may have been destroyed by the nature, our past actions will be remembered by our families and friends.

5 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

Doesn't feel like all it is ends here.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
Bradf0rd(1422) Disputed
1 point

People without arms (sometimes) don't feel like they're missing arms...

It's all in your head.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

We will exist as spirits for a small time. then we will be judged and granted our bodies in a perfect form. we also existed before we lived here...so im not sure how valid that argument is.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!

Man, I got so many negative votes on the other side of the column that i decided to switch to this one and see how I fair. I mean, I'm easy but don't let it get around.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
deepishm(350) Disputed
1 point

so you mean you are a chameleon.......................................

4 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

I figure it this way. What is nothingness? How can we just cease to exist? As humans we cannot physically understand being nothing because it is not possible. Primarily there are two answers to this debate. People who believe in religion or ghosts and people who don't. I believe in God but I also believe in spirits. Now, religion aside (because this has nothing to do with the debate) spirits do exist. There are EVPs and so forth that science has proven is above the natural but there is also other proof that spirits of people dead and gone are still around. Whether just imprints on nature or intelligent beings spirits do exist which is a life after death.

5 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

i believe that our sole is still there so we go in another thing that has just been born.

5 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

Our consciousness and our desire and attachment to this world still exists therefore not only we will exist after our bodies die, we will reborn again because of this attachment to this world

5 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

your soul cant just die... your spirit still lives on through all of the people you have touched during your life...

a soul isnt someting like before you were born, i believe its like your inner core that developes as you grow, and its like a force that cant just dissapear.

5 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

i beleve in ghost and stuff wen you think in the big picture thers got to be more......

5 years ago | Side: O yes!

I'm not a religious person, but Ronlyn Dominique's argument in "The Mercy of Thin Air" convinced me of life after death. She put it very simply: nobody knows what makes the heart beat. The brain sends impulses to voluntary and involuntary muscles of the heart, but what makes the brain send these impulses? Chemical signals? And why are these chemical signals sent? There must be some other reason.

And this is why I believe in a soul. Matter and energy cannot be destroyed. John Mellencamp may put it best: "Life goes on long after the thrill of living is gone."

5 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

Depends how you look at it. I don't think we continue to exist in a way that our souls are somewhere, but I believe we usually continue to exist in the sense that our presence is kept alive through family and friends (if you had any).

5 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

It depends on how we define ourselves. Obviously who we are today differs from who we were earlier. If the essential qualities of our being change drastically, do we cease to exist or do we continue to exist as a changed being? I like to think of my dying body as (to paraphrase Einstein) merely a wilting leaf on the tree of life. I don't think that "who I am" began in my mothers womb. I hopefully live on through my offspring both biologically and ideologically.

4 years ago | Side: O yes!

lots of people must have read this question wrong it says exist not live, so i think we definatly do contione to exist after death just not after life because exsisting is your body actually being there you know your cells are all there so you definatly still exist after death!

4 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

oh boy i hope so ..................................btw it kind of looks like god himself appeared here, to grade people, for their oppinion in this debate....hmm?

4 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

Here is an informative article on the issue (for both scientists and philosophers):

http://www.christian-thinktank.com/hmosoul.html

3 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

We do continue after death as spirits. There are a few rare people that have the ability to see and hear these spirits and some that can feel the spirits around them. There is a place that spirits go but they can only go there once they no longer have any unfinished business upon this world. There are also some spirits, known as demons, that are very evil and powerful. Due to the fact that there is no Hell there is no place for these evil spirits but among the living.

254 days ago | Side: O yes!
-1 points

Yes, I think we continue to exist in the spiritual sense. Either your soul goes to Heaven or it goes to Hell, depending on the life you lead on Earth.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
Tamisan(890) Disputed
1 point

Since this is a debate, can you cite evidence that there is a heaven or a hell?

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!

My evidence is anecdotal.

1. My ex-wife went to a psychic who told her that I needed to go to the hospital because a problem with my back. A month or so later, I was cross-eyed for 6 months while the doctors struggled to find out what was wrong with me. My current wife Googled my condition during this time and suggested I go to a different neurologist and ask him to check for a spontaneous spinal fluid leak (a very rare condition). He confirmed her diagnosis, operated on my back and cured me.

2. My mom had this recurring dream over a period of a few weeks. It was always the same. An analog clock on the wall displaying 6:00 o'clock. The last time she had this dream there was a change. She kept on saying, "I'm late, dear God, I'm late." In the morning, she found out my grandfather died. She went to his funeral. When she came back she had with her one of those little pamphlets they give out at the funeral with information about the person that had died. She gave that to my dad. He looked at it and said, "Hon, did you know that your father died on June 12th? Six, twelve. The numbers on the clock in your dream. Your last dream was when he died and you were late. You weren't at his bedside when he died."

I know this is not the type of proof people are looking for. All of this can be easily dismissed by anyone who hasn't experienced it but if you ever experience it, it's hard to dismiss.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
-1 points

And that's a big part of that religious stuff I don't understand:

You can never know if you have really been good enough.

So once you die you will learn if you spend eternity in heaven or hell.

No wonder the religious people want to believe in an after-life, because its really hard to enjoy life, when every wrong decision might lead you to eternal damnation.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
0 points

Whaaa? You speak funny. Come again?

Are you saying religious people don't want to enjoy life?

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
-2 points
-3 points
InvisaWoman(42) Disputed
-3 points
-2 points
-2 points
11 points

It'll be just like the time before we were born.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
2 points

Life before life is no more rational that life after life.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!

That's the best analogy :)

What people call a soul is a cultural element. I think it's all in our brains.

Life your life, because that's all you get.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
0 points

I often use this analogy to explain what I think happens when we die. We essential return from whence we came, into nothingness. If that sounds horribly bleak to you, take comfort in the fact that nothingness will be painless, so whether you lived a good or bad life, there awaits no fire and brimstone for you.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
InvisaWoman(42) Disputed
-1 points

You say that "it'll be just like the time before we were born," but how do you know what the time before you were born was like? As far as I know, none of us remember what it was like in the womb nor can any one person attest to what it was like before the sperm met the egg. So there is, of course, the opportunity that prior to birth a persons soul existed in heaven or some form of a paradisaical place but you just cannot remember now.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
geoff(741) Disputed
0 points

that's the point. You're not going to know what it's like after you're dead either. Anything is possible of course but probably the best way to navigate through the universe is to consider the evidence.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
mumin(214) Disputed
0 points

I agree with you... but you're opposing your own argument. You should be in the other column.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!

The original poster makes the distinction between "We" and "our body." This distinction is of course illusionary, but referencing our body as something supplemental to the self, "I", "me", or consciousness is somewhat convenient (though technically wrong).

So since in actuality the question asks "does our self/consciousness continue to exist..." I can only answer no. Scientific and neurological research has consistently confirmed that our memories, beliefs, feelings, thoughts, and sense of self are all due to the organ called the brain and the activities within. So, when our bodies die nature doesn't give a whiff about the false dichotomy between "me" and "my body". Our brain/bodies die; "we" die too, because memories, opinions, feelings, and awareness melt away as the brain decays.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
3 points

I couldn't agree more.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
KnwledgNinja(14) Disputed
0 points

I have to admit I more want to comment than favor or oppose. First, I think science would contend it is the nervous system, of which the brain is a central part, that is the seat of consciousness. But it seems to me that the idea of consciousness is a fuzzy one at best. If consciousness is the result of a complex system of electrical signals, where does it stop? There is electrical activity at all levels of atomic interaction. Why is neural electrical activity more significant than other more subtle energetic interactions? I guess I feel that the idea of awareness/consciousness is pretty subjective. I've heard arguments that mice or other animals aren't self-aware/conscious, even though they have nervous systems too. To me, it's just a bias of viewpoint or misunderstanding of levels of awareness. It's just human to want to feel superior. (I think this could be applied to favoring or opposing.) Anyway, I think I just asked more questions than made arguments. Just my two cents.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
4 points

Unless one can show that the soul, living independently of the brain, can somehow retain identity and memory, or even thought, then the answer is a resounding "no".

Faith in the afterlife provides us with nothing more than comfort. But even then, that kind of faith is observably false, and this false faith is exemplified in the fact that both the faithful and the skeptic do everything in our power to ensure that we succeed in this life: through economics, power and influence, to ensure that our children have the best lives possible.

The afterlife is not only an afterthought, it is a nonexistent thing in practice for almost every human being on the planet.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
mumin(214) Disputed
2 points

What if you could exist without an identity and a memory? What if your soul does in fact retain identity and memory? Can you prove me wrong?

Sure, like animals, our self-interest drives our actions. But our lives are not spent solely for this purpose. As intelligent beings, humans have ideals and conscience, and these play an important part in our decisions.

And as human beings, we have an inclination to the afterlife, and a desire to join the eternal, and commune with the everlasting supernatural infinite realm.

Is all you see what you believe? Or what you believe is what you see. You can cry that there's no evidence, and that it doesn't exist - for your own comfort - because you would rather live day to day like it doesn't matter, it's nonsense. For someone like me, it exists, I can almost reach out and touch it.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
Mahollinder(897) Disputed
4 points

I don't have the capacity to disprove predictive, supernatural, hypothetical scenarios. It could very well be the case that our souls retain memory and identity after death. But just because I can't disprove something doesn't mean that it does exist.

I can't disprove the proposition that there is an immaterial gnome in the Andromeda galaxy that tills soil for a living and exports it to other planets in the form of comets. But both your and my examples are simply unlikely.

However, it has been observed, and it is demonstrable that if the left hemisphere of our brain is damaged, then we lose our notion of self in relation to "everything else". It is also demonstrable that if our brain in general is damaged, we lose our memory - short term or longterm.

So, we know that identity and memory are inextricably connected to our functioning brains. And even if there is an infinite realm, the very nature of such a realm is counterintuitive to identity. For there is no part of infinity. There just is. Believing that the soul harbors our memories and our identity doesn't make sense when we juxtapose that belief with the above.

Human beings are intelligent. But our decisions are normally centered around how we are going to survive, the quality of our survival, the quality of life we provide for our children, we are concerned with how we treat strangers (filoxenia), and how we treat the environment - ensuring that it is stable, safe and productive for posterity.

These are concerns that fundamentally invalidate any belief in the afterlife. Everything we do on this planet - in practice - expresses the fundamental notion that we know that this physical existence, the thing you call "I" or "self" is all that there is. Human living is enough evidence of that.

And this has nothing to do with me or anyone like me wanting to shirk responsible living. It is quite the opposite. When we put aside the notion of the afterlife, we are forced to become culpable in how we treat each other, our environment, and how we ensure our future on this planet. And this culpability is not contingent on our prospective existence during an afterlife.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
4 points

There is no hard, scientific evidence that anything remains after death except a decaying corpse. Of course, people believe a lot of irrational, illogical, and unprovable things. It's a matter of faith, no proof.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
3 points

lol @ "hell" no

pun intended? :P

But really, this debate is flawed from its creation, as it begs the question of whether or not there is a part of a human being that exists independent of ones body. It assumes a soul. Fact is, we have no idea, and it can't be proven one way or the other, at present. Therefore, speculations on an afterlife are basically moot.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
2 points

There is no such thing as a soul. When we die, we cease to exist. Except in the memories of the people we knew.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
0 points

You can't know that for a fact, but following the evidence, it's logically prudent to eschew such a notion.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
-3 points
xaeon(1069) Disputed
4 points

Wow, I've actually never read such utter nonsense in all my life.

"I fail to see the logic in this argument because it could just as easily be flipped the other way to argue that atheists create the false illusion that there is no afterlife because of a fear that they have in being accountable for their actions. Maybe they feel like they've already gone so wrong that they couldn't possibly amend their lives (which of course isn't true)."

If we had fear that we were going to be acountable for our actions after death (which, we are, but by our families and friends, not by a God), then we wouldn't be atheists, surely?

I don't wish to create the illusion of an afterlife simply because it isn't true. When you die, you die, and that's it. I'm perfectly happy living my life without the thought that once I die I'm going to carry on. The accountability of my actions are here and now, with my family, friends, co-workers, etc. I prefer living my life for those people, not for the big man in the sky who's going to judge me when I finally shuffle off of this mortal coil.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
watup962(11) Disputed
1 point

"but the second one of their loved ones dies, a rather large portion of them will all of the sudden say something like, "oh, well I know he/she is up in heaven looking down on me". I don't want to throw the flag and say all or even most atheists are like this, but in my life I've seen quite a few"

This is a common misconception. The truth of the matter is that atheists are all too often brought up in homes which believe such things as an afterlife. The fact that an atheist says something like this is his/her natural verbal response because they were brought up that way. Although it may be possible to shake the belief in a supernatural being or religion, it may be all but impossible to completely shake the culture that one was brought up with.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
2 points

If science, as we know it now, is correct about the universe's constant expanding and collapsing, though I doubt it, then the chances of the universe expanding as it did this time, in the exact same order are infinite and we have probably lived these lives infinity many times in the past, and we will live them again infinitely many times in the future. So, yes, we will exist after death, but only to relive our lives infinitely. Think about it... if there is no real time, and the universe is all there is in reality (also doubt it), and it's expanding and contracting, what are the chances of it unfolding the exact same way again, to create us again? Even if it took 999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999.99 billion billion trillion quadrillion zillion centuries to do it again, or longer, we won't know that passing of time because we will be unconscious. We will only know the time period between being born and dying... and I will write and submit this text an infinite number of times, and you, whoever you are, will read it an infinite number of times... eugh

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

Aaah yes.... I would have to say you're right (why do I have to keep telling you that you should be in the other goddam column??!!)

At the risk of sounding like I'm Neo, I'll just tell you one thing that I realized some time back...

There's a way out

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
2 points

Our consciousness is the product of our physical brain. Once that is destroyed, it's logical to assume we cease to exist. Anything else is just wishful thinking.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

Our atoms will continue to exist, but we will not. We are, basically, our brains. Without them, our thoughts, personalities, ideas, experiences, and memories do not exist.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

The question presumes a distinction between the mind (the 'we', he refers to) and the body. We speak of the body as if they are two different things, the self exists as a mindbody constant. The parameters may change, one could loose a limb or suffer brain damage but so long as the mindbody constant remains unbroken the self can arguably be said to exist. However, to the question of do 'we' exist when our bodies die? I think the answer to that can only be no. At least no without appeal to such irrational concepts as 'immortal soul' or 'divine spark' or other such notions.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

First we have to ask what makes a person a person. It's obviously their individuality. If you grew a human in a lab with no brain therefore unable to have a personality or an ego or anything, and set it on fire or killed it in any way, it'd be unreasonable to have remorse since it's not a person. It was simply an empty husk of human tissue.

So if we agree that what makes us "us" is within our brain -- our ability to store memories and form personalities that allow us to interact with other people and things -- then we have to agree that once we die and the brain dies and rots away, all of those memories and areas within the brain making us who we are as a person are all gone as well, and therefore we are then gone.

Yes the energy that powered us is all around us. The body runs on electricity. However to say that because this electricity, this energy, is still there around us therefore we are still in existence because of that after we're dead is like saying that a Pepsi bottle I once drank soda from still exists even after it's been recycled and used to make a window.

Once your brain is gone, YOU are gone. If you want to have faith and think that you still live after death by going to heaven or you're sitting in a limbo waiting to be put into another newborn's body where you will in essence be born again, then go for it, but that is as of today science fiction.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
mumin(214) Disputed
0 points

Science fiction or religious belief, whatever. Not that these futuristic, unconventional or unpopular concepts eventually do come to be accepted eventually. People would've scoffed you had you told them your conciousness resides in the brain before it wass scientifically discovery.

I argue that the brain is part of the husk you call the body. Our 'being' is really the soul that occupies the body, using its lungs to breathe, its heart to contniue functioning, its brain to think and so on. But once the soul has vacated the 'husk' as you so aptly call it, the soul continues its existence, perhaps outside the physical realm.

'Empty husk of human tissue'? If you think so, you should pull the plug on all those unfortunate people with brain damage in comas etc.

I didn't ask if our bodies continue to exist, I said we. Your analogy of the Pepsi bottle is inappropriate as it refers to the Pepsi bottle not, for example, the glass which continues to exist in another form.

6 years ago | Side: O yes!
1 point

Well, I'm going to assume this question is in the context of a 'spirit' or 'soul' scenario, in that case, no.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

This is one of those questions where there is little evidence on both sides. From a logical point of view, no we do not CONTINUE TO EXIST. It means our bodies existed, but do not have life anymore.

But then another question arises, what does it really mean to exist? Does it mean we have "life," the ability to touch, to sense, to feel. What if I think about a rabbit in my head. It does exist in my head, but not physically. So does it mean that it exists or does not exist? Is the ability to think part of existing?

WE can never REALLY know until we die. Even then, it may not answer the question. I personally don't think there is any sort of "afterlife" so I have to say no.

5 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

WE will NOT exist after our bodies die. i mean hell we are DEAD nothing is going to change that.

4 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

Nope. When our bodies die. The soul in our body leaves the body and goes into the spirtual world. Also you go straight into your destination like Heaven or Hell

2 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

what i would like to say is neither scientific nor spiritual. we don't know. we can discuss it until it happens but we don't know. what difference does it make. now is what we have. that's what we should be interested in. whatever it is that happens at death is going to be exactly what it is. period.

2 years ago | Side: WE DON'T KNOW

I'm going to have to go with no overall; if we do, I sincerely doubt it's in a form that would be recognizable to us as ourselves, or to others for that matter.

Consider the functionality of the brain and the result of damage to it; those with brain injuries commonly lose memories and sometimes undergo massive personality changes as well. I would expect the death of the brain to be the death of both our memories and our personality as well.

I'm not married to this perspective, however; if, hypothetically, the 'immortal soul' does exist, I would expect part of the brains function to be a physical interface through which the soul interacts with the world via the body. If this were the case, damaging that interface would most likely disrupt the ability of the soul to interact with it correctly. This could well manifest in the loss of conscious memories and radical changes in behaviour and personality, among other things. Additionally, memories being stored in the 'immortal soul' could be an explanation as to why we still have next to no understanding about how memory works (physically speaking, I mean) despite exhaustive research into the matter. That said, this line of thinking is most decidedly religious, attributing something that we don't understand (yet?) to the supernatural. Then again, the supernatural could also be said to be that which we don't yet understand; the soul may well be a very real, natural thing, not supernatural at all, that we simply don't have the ability to analyze and measure yet. Time will tell, I suppose?

A hybrid of the two is also hypothetically possible; in this hypothetical model, the brain is still a physical interface for the soul to interact with the world via the body, but memories and those aspects of our personality that derive from memories could well die with the body. Lacking evidence for any of these, this model 'feels' the most correct to me- but that is still a belief, not anything substantiated by evidence, and it will certainly be subject to change should new evidence be discovered. Which brings me back to my opening statement; if we do continue to exist after death, I sincerely doubt it's in a form that would be recognizable to us as ourselves, or to others for that matter- and thats close enough to not existing for me to vote no.

252 days ago | Side: Hell no!
0 points

Since their is no scientific proof that their is some sort of afterlife and the science we knows suggests that their isnt an afterlife. Then we should just assume there is no an afterlife.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
1 point

100% correct.......................................................

when science our creator has no evidence the we should assume there is no afterlife........

4 years ago | Side: Hell no!
0 points

If by "we" you mean consciousness or awareness, then no. Our consciousness/awareness is a machination of the functions of the brain, which can cease to function. And when it ceases to function, "we" cease to exist. It'll be just like before we were born, just like falling asleep without any dreams or nightmares. Nothing, though without the capacity to even recognize the nothing.

If by "we" you mean physical body, then of course. Our atoms will be recycled back into the environment just as they always have.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
0 points

In a physical sense, our matter continues to exist. In a mental or emotional sense, our soul, our being, our personality, whatever you want to call it, is finished. If the chemical processes that drive our thoughts, feelings and emotions stop functioning then as a consciousness we cease to exist. I agree, it would be exactly like before you were born...

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
0 points

WE POOP WHEN WE DIE!

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
-1 points

There is a lack of evidence that we exist when our bodies die. The few reports of a dead person contacting friends or relatives can't be repeated for the purposes of scientific study, so they can't be proved.

We do know what happens to bodies: they are buried or cremated. Since our sense of who we are is closely bound with our bodies, it is hard to imagine that we would could exist in any meaningful way without bodies.

Those of us who are still alive can't know for certain what it is like to be dead, but our best guess has to be that we do not continue to exist when our bodies die.

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
-2 points
RickTM(20) Disputed
5 points

What about in the mental sense of other people? When you die won't your being continue to live on in the mind of others?

6 years ago | Side: Hell no!
-2 points
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-3 points
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