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Debate Info

6
7
Eurogames Ameritrash
Debate Score:13
Arguments:16
Total Votes:13
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Argument Ratio

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 Eurogames (6)
 
 Ameritrash (7)

Debate Creator

Ajvanho(14) pic



Eurogames vs Ameritrash

Ameritrash is "a catchphrase for 'American style boardgames.' In general, this means games that emphasize a highly developed theme, characters, heroes, or factions with individually defined abilities, player to player conflict, and usually feature a moderate to high level of luck."

Eurogames (or alternatively, Designer Board Games or German-Style Board Games) are a classification of board games that are very popular on Board Game Geek (BGG). Though not all eurogames are European and not all of them are board games, they share a set of similar characteristics. A game need not fit ALL the criteria to be considered a Eurogame.

Most Eurogames share the following elements:

  • Player conflict is indirect and usually involves competition over resources or points. Combat is extremely rare.
  • Players are never eliminated from the game (All players are still playing when the game ends.)
  • There is very little randomness or luck. Randomness that is there is mitigated by having the player decide what to do after a random event happens rather than before. Dice are rare, but not unheard of, in a Euro.
  • The Designer of the game is listed on the game's box cover. Though this is not particular to Euros, the Eurogame movement seems to have started this trend. This is why some gamers and designers call this genre of games Designer Games.
  • Much attention is paid to the artwork and components. Plastic and metal are rare, more often pieces are made of wood.
  • Eurogames have a definite theme, however, the theme most often has very little to do with the gameplay. The focus instead is on the mechanics; for example, a game about space may play the same as a game about ancient Rome.


(source: https://boardgamegeek.com )

Eurogames

Side Score: 6
VS.

Ameritrash

Side Score: 7
1 point

If I have to put in a good word for Eurogames, I'd say I'll probably always prefer them to Ameritrash when it comes to design. Meaning looks and materials used. I'm not a huge Carcassonne player, to mention one, but you can't beat Meeples when it comes to pawns, c'mon: simple and effective. Not to mention, less detailed means reusable and fit to almost any situation.

Side: Eurogames
Ajvanho(14) Disputed
1 point

Good design is a design that gives you a better playing experience, and the problem with Eurogames is the lack of connection between the artwork and gameplay. Sure, Carcasonne "makes sense" in that setting, but so do many other settings (Hunters and gatherers, Star wars galaxy theme... so many variations with the same mechanic shows how little it matters). In short, design is not utilized to its fullest to immerse the player in the game. Meeples are easy to produce and practical, but they're bland and without character. When you take a figure from Kemet - you feel the character, not just of your side, but the character of the game!

Side: Ameritrash
Ajvanho(14) Clarified
1 point
Side: Eurogames
Geilie(7) Disputed
1 point

I can't dispute that Ameritrash has the shiny design that gets you into the mood of the game if you like that kind of full-immersion experience, but I suppose it all boils down to whether you prefer your game experience to be inside your head, at least partly, or fully on the board. Eurogames (not all of them, as not all Ameritrash are full of complicated miniatures and overly detailed elements) give you a mechanic that you can build upon in your head, Ameritrash give you a whole world to play in... but it's all said and done, too much visual input and less imagination. It rather depends on personal taste, I dare say, and I'm obviously more for the minimalist side.

Side: Eurogames
1 point

Eurogames don't need to be board games: Eurogames primarily function on the principle that you collect points from your surroundings, whereas the opponents are merely racing to achieve a score (anticlimactic?) faster than you. At best, they represent an obstacle the player has to work around, and a potential ally to hinder stronger opponents together. At worst, they're just human difficulty level.

Computer games, on the other hand, have developed enough to be worthy adversaries even in complex games like Catan. A player can have pretty much the same experience of playing Carcassone at a table as they can playing it on a computer. And that's not just a waste of resources, it's a waste of opportunity.

Ameritrash is utilizing the one aspect video games will never have: physical human presence and interaction. By making the challenge focus on opponents rather than a board, the game gives meaning to the other player (rather than them just being, as mentioned, a difficulty level and obstacle). If you see your opponent as more than a competitor for the same goods (wheat, rivers or kingdoms) you can experience them as a person, and not a lever in an open market. And that is the beauty of board games that Eurogames are missing.

Side: Ameritrash
Geilie(7) Disputed
1 point

I'm the wrong person to defend Eurogames, I like conflict in games most of the time (or human interaction, if you wish), but I'm also a big lover of coop games and those are mainly a Euro thing. How do you justify that?

Side: Eurogames
Ajvanho(14) Disputed
1 point

Cooperation is not limited to Eurogames. Bang is a good example - a competitive game in which you better cooperate if you want to survive! Conflict doesn't mean lack of cooperation - quite the opposite, you're more likely to work together if you have a common enemy (for example an OP opponent)

Side: Ameritrash