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51
37
Flipped Learning Pros Flipped Learning Cons
Debate Score:88
Arguments:91
Total Votes:90
Ended:07/16/18
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 Flipped Learning Pros (47)
 
 Flipped Learning Cons (34)

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Flipped Learning - DDOBLE (Summer 2018)

Tell us why you are 'for' or 'against' flipped learning.  Pros can be in the form of benefits of flipped learning and cons can be in the form of challenges.

Flipped Learning Pros

Side Score: 51
Winning Side!
VS.

Flipped Learning Cons

Side Score: 37
3 points

A flipped classroom is a great way to increase growth mindset through the power of mistake making and healthy struggle in the classroom. Having students investigate concepts in a flipped learning model allows for the students to take ownership for their learning, self-advocate, and allow for more specific questioning when they need clarity. When done well, flipped learning enables teachers go meet kids where they are at and go deeper should it be found they have a solid understanding of prior knowledge than expected. It allows for the teacher to provide the "just-in-time" advice, correcting logical fallacies before they take hold, while also facilitating deeper growth around the student's own self-directed interest and questioning around the content at hand. However, it would be wise to pair flipped learning with other methods of instruction, as multiple instructional pedagogies will better meet the diverse learning needs of the various students in a class.

Daniel Corrigan

ED.893.645.91

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
RRibota(3) Disputed
1 point

Hi Daniel,

I am struggling with the phrase "just-in-time" advice. If the students are able to complete the videos at their own leisure, how is feedback given "just-in-time" since the teacher is not constantly monitoring when a students has completed the video? In the more traditional classroom, during guided practice, feedback is given in a shorter amount of time. With the flipped classroom, teachers view student response and then respond the next day. Wouldn't that make it more challenging since students have had half a day to think their thinking is correct?

I do agree, however, that teachers will have more information about every student that completes the assignment, which may be more that usual.

Thanks for your post!

~Rachael Nyberg-Hampton, ED.893.645.9A

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
DCorrigan(3) Clarified
1 point

Thanks Rachael and sorry for the confusion with my "just-in time" phrase. What I mean is that students can be guided through difficulties as they occur with peer and teacher input that normally may not come to surface without a flipped model approach. Such an approach allows for student agency towards questioning, and by proxy of that questioning, their level of understanding. The "just-in-time" advice refers to the peer and teacher formative feedback that can help direct the questioning toward deeper levels of understanding as they arise, whether done at home and brought into the classroom the next day, or in the moment at class. I'm referring to helping guide students in that understanding prior to fueling misconceptions around a topic/standard that may take deeper roots had a student not been able to have the agency to develop their own questioning around the content, not necessarily in live time at the exact second a query is posed.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
2 points

The flipped learning strategy is an effective way to increase student learning outcomes. Not only does it provide students direct access to the content, but it also allows teachers and students to make the most of instructional time. By implementing the flipped learning strategy, instructional time can be freed up, especially on the part of teachers, who are able to move about the learning space monitoring student progress and providing support. In addition, by allowing students to complete the bulk of the "heavy lifting" during instructional time, they not only have access to direct support from teachers and peers, but in an age of schedule-overload, can complete their work at school.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
brookeshine(2) Disputed
1 point

Although, in a perfect world, all students will complete the necessary requirements at home and ahead of time, we know as educators that this is not always the case. Some will argue that it could actually be counterproductive to utilize this model if students are not able to access the necessary technology at home or if they choose not to complete the work altogether. Then, students are entering the classroom unprepared, and the teacher is forced to teach the lesson in person regardless, even though they could have accomplished this the day before. What could be an effective strategy to combat this fear when introducing this to educators who have not engaged in the Flipped Learning classroom model before?

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

Brooke,

I agree, and this argument is one of the reasons I vacillated when trying to decide which side of the debate I would take. I don't know how to counter this other than having a grading system that makes the at-home work unavoidable.

Emelie

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

I too agree with Brooke's point here.

What worries me is that over time, teachers would be incentivised to push ever greater chunks of work into the pre-class "home-work" load.

At our schools, we have been trying to move a "no homework" model in order to allow children to be freed from the intense stress Indian schools put them under and to allow them to use their time at home to pursue other interests and spend time with the family.

I wonder how this works with flipped classrooms. One possible answer would be to designate free time during the school day for personal work. But, wouldn't that frustrate the flexibilty that Flipped learning is meant to offer?

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

A flipped classroom model can be transformative in a student’s learning process. Given the challenges, I believe that this form of differentiation will be one step closer to a quality education for all students. As a kindergarten teacher, I do very little direct instruction as a whole group. Most mini lessons take place during small group rotations/centers. If I could compile a list of resources to have students go through a mini lesson at home, I could spend our classroom time practicing the skills they learned at home. We can foster more collaboration and deeper learning by working in groups with the teacher serving as a facilitator. Although these mini lessons will take some time to curate, students can gain quality lessons that are meant for them. These resources can be videos, songs, or games for the variety of learners. They can be kinesthetic activities for students to model after the teacher. I am not saying that simply watching videos on the computer is transformative, but careful planning in utilizing class time for more active learning and engagement would be. Another challenge can be access to computers, and I find that this will always be a challenge. However, it is important that we help these students gain access. As educators, we are here to support our students. Perhaps, we can open up our classrooms 30 minutes earlier in the morning or 30 minutes after school so students can access the content. Maybe there is a way to open computer lab hours for students before or after school using administrators’ approval. A flipped classroom model may not work for every classroom or teacher, but it can prove to be very beneficial for students. There are many important factors that must be in place in order for it to be successful. In conclusion, it may take more work and planning, but students will receive the quality education they deserve.

Ada Yeung

ED.893.645.91.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Hi Ada,

Fellow kindergarten teacher here. While I am on the other side of this debate, I agree with you that thoughtful parent engagement is crucial for mastery of concepts. I worry, though, that not all parents are able to support their child with homework. Language barriers, education levels, or work schedules sometimes interfere with parental support. I think your solution of opening up the classroom has potential, as long as parents were able to change their schedule to drop students off earlier or pick them up later. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and ideas.

Tracy Kimball

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
SamanthaB(3) Disputed
1 point

Hi Ada,

I agree with Tracy, a supportive home life community is essential for this to work. If the student does not have access to a home community that is supportive towards their education this can be causing an even greater disservice to the child. Unfortunately I do not see the issue as easily fixable as offering 30 mins in the morning or after school to students. Many students at my school arrive chronically late to school making having actually class time with those students challenging. Many students must also leave immediately after school to help with familial obligations such as picking up younger siblings from their schools or guardians want their children home immediately after school to avoid gang violence. I think the flipped classroom can be great for some students but not all.

ED.893.645.9A.SU18 Samantha Barreiro

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
Kellio15(9) Disputed
1 point

Ada,

Thank you for your argument. Although I initially responded on the other side for my own personal reasons given my school's circumstances, your argument has given me food for thought. Out of the 80 3rd graders that I had last year, I knew of less than 5 that had wifi at home and devices at home. When I responded, I did not think of opening up my classroom to students who would want to come in before or after school. I love this idea, I guess my two thoughts with this are: I only have 30 devices so having 80 3rd graders coming before or after school may not work. But also, how would you handle working through a student who was not completing the tasks time and time again? Would you stop providing this time of learning and do a 1:1 approach with this child or group of children? Again, I fully understand with little ones that it is out of their control and they should not be held accountable if the resources or time is just not there for them?

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

I currently work at a project-based, arts integrated school. Our lessons currently operate in a workshop model. There is a 10-15 min mini lesson. The mini lesson is followed by approx. 45 min of work time where students are completing activities that reinforce the mini lesson which includes catch and release. At the end of the work time, there is a reflection. While I do not think direct instruction for the majority of class is particularly effective, the days of 45 minute lectures should be over especially for K-12 students. However, I believe that flipped classrooms use work time and that is what really makes it an effective practice. Students will need an adjustment period as well as teachers; however, I feel that the emphasis on more practice time is why discipline issues and failures decreased ("The Flipped Classroom").

The Flipped Classroom allows for differentiation through being able to pause and rewind (Bergmann et. al, 2012, n.p.). Also, it connect students to the world wide web. Also real learning can happen when classrooms become laboratories, workshops, and stages. Overall, I think that flipping classrooms are beneficial. However, I am not certain if the success that flipped classrooms comes from the at home time or the exposure to hands on activities, etc. in class.

Brittany Brown

ED.893.645

References

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Why you should flip your classroom. In Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day (pp. 19–33). Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112060/chapters/Why-You-Should-Flip-Your-Classroom.aspx

The Flipped Classroom. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ddelefltoolkit.wordpress.com/

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
StephMurray(3) Disputed
1 point

Hi Brittany!

Research supports that Flipped Classrooms provide students with opportunities to dive deeper into the learning material. However, I do not believe Flipped Classrooms are for every student and classroom. Students who are successful in Flipped Classrooms have access to technology and are self-disciplined. These students know how they learn and what strategies work best with their individual learning styles. If a student is unmotivated or traditionally struggles with learning new content, it can be easy for these types of students to get distracted or persevere when learning at home. Students who do not have access can easily fall behind and/or have to wait until the next school day to ask questions or receive affirmation from their teacher.

Stephanie Murray

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

From my personal experience teaching in a low-income community I could not see Flipped Classrooms working at my school and for most schools in my district as an effective instructional strategy. 77% of students in DCPS (DC Public Schools) are classified as Economically Disadvantaged, which the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), says are students who possess one of these characteristics: “Received Free or Reduced-Price Lunch; Received FRL through CEP (attending a school where the entire student population receives FRL); Eligible to receive TANF or SNAP benefits; Identified as homeless in available homeless data feeds; Under the care of CFSA" (DCPS Enrollment, Page 1). Expecting families to have access to a computer, laptop, or tablet at home is an unrealistic expectation. If one or more students was missing the technology how would the teacher benefit from a Flipped Classroom? Lacking technology is something that teachers struggle with every day, even lacking the technology from our homeroom classrooms and computer labs. Another issue I see with the Flipped Classroom model is the different proficiency levels of students. In my last three years of teaching, my classroom ranges from students being four grade levels below proficiency to being four grade levels above proficiency. Differentiation is the biggest difficulty when having students of various grade levels and giving a grade level assignment to the class when half the class is still working on sight words and the basics of learning how to read would be pointless. I would love to incorporate a Flipped Classroom for my students who are at and above grade level, but it would not be possible for whole group instruction for many classes in DCPS.

(n.d.). DCPS at a Glance: Enrollment. Retrieved July 10, 2018, from https://dcps.dc.gov/page/dcps-glance-enrollment

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

When teachers and students are sufficiently trained, prepared, and given adequate resources/time, flipped classrooms are great ways to differentiate instruction to students of all levels. Flipped classrooms allow students to learn and review content at their own pace.

In a traditional classroom, a student who struggles with a topic will get left behind to fail. As many subjects, such as math, build upon concepts in ways that require mastery of the lower concepts; those students who struggle with the lower level concepts will fall behind for the entire year. If these students don't understand step 2, they will not be able to understand step 6. This student will feel discouraged and frustrated as the classes moves on, while they still don't understand the topic. In a flipped classroom, this student would not fall behind. Instead, this student would continue to work on step 2 (with teacher help if needed) before moving onto the next steps.

While not all schools have the resources, time, and training to effectively implement the flipped classroom; in an ideal world the flipped classroom would be preferable to the traditional classroom.

Rose Brown ED.893.945.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
rachlucero(2) Disputed
1 point

Hi Rosie, thanks for your analysis. One argument I have to your point "In a flipped classroom, this student would not fall behind. Instead, this student would continue to work on step 2" is that not every student will be able to get a concept through watching a video. I am not saying that students do not learn from videos, but I have found that many of my students still struggle with math when watching a video or do not retain the conceptual knowledge because they were really just following and memorizing a process that they watched on the screen. Thus, they would have issues applying this concept to new scenarios. Flipped learning lessons must be mixed with activities that allow for students to build knowledge in multiple modes so that they fully understand a concept and its application.

Rachel Luceor

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
Rosiecb(4) Disputed
1 point

Hello,

My current understanding is that when students do "struggle with math when watching a video" that the teacher would become aware and most likly take time to sit down with them one on one to clarify the process. When this occurs, it is only the one student who is affected. More advanced students are not required to slow down their learning based on the few who need extra time.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Lisa Rosales

ED.893.645.9A

I believe the flip classroom approach is highly beneficial if implemented correctly. Unlike a traditional classroom, the flipped classroom provides students with more in-class opportunity for one-on-one support, more opportunity for targeted differentiation, and optionality for students to work at their own pace (Educause, 2012). On the other hand, some educators complain about the time investment, lack of administrative, student, and parent support, and intellectual property issues. While many of these concerns are valid, I believe that with proper prep most concerns can be mitigated. Ultimately, students, especially English language learners (ESL), can benefit from a flipped classroom where they can engage with course content at their own pace and ask questions during class as needed. Additionally, flipped classrooms are known for increasing student collaboration which drastically helps ESL students synthesize and retain knowledge. Overall, flipped classrooms might require an additional time investment for teachers; however, it offers tremendous benefits for all students (Bergmann & Sams, 2012).

References

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Why you should flip your classroom. In Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day (pp. 19–33). Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112060/chapters/Why-You-Should-Flip-Your-Classroom.aspx

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
RRibota(3) Disputed
1 point

Hi Lisa,

I agree with some of the benefits that you listed of flipped learning, such as the option for students to work at their own pace and stronger supports for ELL's. I believe the concerns you listed, however, are substantial enough to take away from the benefits of a flipped classroom. As demonstrated by Dr. Renner's study, if the program is not implemented correctly, it will not have a significant benefit to the students when compared with a traditional model. It also does not benefit either party to put in significantly more work for the same outcome. I believe more research needs to be done in order to streamline what the flipped classroom is, and is not, before widespread implementation.

Thank you for your post!

~Rachael Nyberg-Hampton; ED.893.645.9A

Reference:

Hennessy, M. (2012, August 10). New Study on the Flipped Classroom by Concordia Portland’s Dr. Jeremy Renner Shows Mixed Results. [blog] Retrieved from https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/students-faculty-alumni/new-study-on-the-flipped-classroom-by-concordias-dr-jeremy-renner-shows-mixed- results/

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
Lrosale2(5) Disputed
1 point

Hello Rachel,

I think you bring up a good point. In order for the benefits to outweigh the cost, individuals implementing a blended classroom must receive proper professional development. The beautiful part about this teaching strategy is that it's pretty new; therefore, as a teacher, we have the opportunity to develop learning communities and professional networks to help us contribute to best practices of a flipped classroom.

Ultimately, I believe teachers should always remain grounded in best practices and teaching is an iterative process. No student, no class, no year is ever exactly the same. If a teacher were to approach the implementation of a flipped classroom as an iterative process, then they might find themselves to be much more successful and the process to be much more rewarding. For example, one might choose to implement one flipped lesson. The teacher would administer a formative assessment to determine how effective the lesson was and if students needed a reteach and then they can make data-driven decisions.

Overall, I agree that teachers should have strong professional development on the implementation of flipped classrooms and a personal learning network; however, teachers should see themselves as contributors to research and best practices rather than bystanders awaiting proven results before implementing.

Lisa Rosales

ED.893.645.9A

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Although never having participated in a flipped classroom, on either end, I loved reading about the wealth of benefits that come from a flipped classroom. A flipped classroom allows for the teacher and learners' time to be maximized. By having students engage in lectures at home, they come to class prepared to dialogue, complete activities, and engage in meaningful collaboration to deepen understanding. The flipped classroom allows for natural differentiation as students can pause, rewind, fast forward, and complete lectures in a time that works for them. During class time, the teacher can then spend his or her time individualizing instruction based upon learner needs. The teacher does not have to waste valuable class time lecturing on new content. Students gain ownership and responsibility, as their breadth and depth of knowledge comes from what they bring to the table in accordance with the mentorship of the teacher. The repurposing of class time highly benefits all that are involved. In the age of digital literacy, this is yet another tool to help our students gain authentic learning experiences, which they will take with them in the future. It is hard for me to see any cons to the flipped classroom.

Ashley Weeks

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

"Devoting class time to an application of concepts may give instructors a better opportunity to detect errors in thinking” (EDUCAUSE, 2012). This statement houses all of the reasons I believe that flipped learning is a beneficial pedagogy technique that educators should utilize in the classroom. Traditional techniques are typically comprised of a framework which combines lecturing and limited allotment of time for grappling with and applying new skills. When an educator offers lectures, they assume or hope that each student is learning at the same pace and can actually internalize information in that manner. A flipped classroom obviously allows for students to pause, rewind, and fast-forward, as well as enable accommodations for individuals such as large print and captioning. In addition to the unmissable benefits mentioned above, the barrier that the educator inadvertently creates by delivering information at the wrong pace or style can be opened simply by the ease of access. After learning the intended skills at a comfortable pace, students interest and engagement will peak. With technology bringing the world into their hands they may, in turn, become self-motivated to learn more skills either vertically (the next level of rigor), or horizontally (something closely related) at their leisure. Essentially, students are given ownership of their own learning and as long as the lessons are well-planned and options are provided students can be held to a higher level of accountability for their own learning. The number of class disruptions from other students asking questions or having behavioral difficulties will decrease; however, students still are able to learn from others' questions through follow-up collaboration. Parents are more likely to become involved in a student's education when they have access to the material and how it is being presented, as they would with the wide-spread availability the flipped learning model presents.

By: Samantha Hutchins ED.893.645.9A

References:

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Although Rebecca Schuman maintained that flipped learning did not lend itself well to humanities classes (2014), I have found it a very useful timesaver in my own ELA classroom, especially when matched with the appropriate task. For example, when having students create a Google Form for the first time, what took an entire period with a traditional model, took only minutes using a flipped instructional video. Or, by creating feedback videos on assignments, each student can be getting personalized feedback, rather than aggregate feedback to the group. Now students aren't wasting time with feedback that does not apply to them.

Many of the critics tend to note that the flipped model replaces the less effective lecture, with a recorded version of a less effective mode of instruction (Schuman, 2014). This seems to be a oversimplification of how the videos may be used. Flipped Learning is defined as a strategy where "direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space" (Flipped Learning Network, 2014). Although lecture is a part of direct instruction, it can be more than that, including model-think-alouds, demonstrations, previewing content, and becoming exposed to important content vocabulary, demonstrating misconceptions and corrections, introduction to new content, etc. In a traditional model, students get one chance to pick up on everything the teacher says during any of these above actions. By flipping, students have the opportunity to stop, pause, rewind, and rewatch, until the have the necessary information to move on in the class, putting the power of information in their own hands.

Eric Russo

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

References:

Flipped Learning Network. (2014). What is flipped learning? The four pillars of F-L-I-P. Retrieved from http://flippedlearning.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/FLIP handoutFNLWeb.pdf

Schuman, R. The Flipped Classroom A disruptive revolution in pedagogy, or yet another educational fad? FEB. 19 2014 11:14 AM Retrieved from http://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2014/02/flipped classroomsincollegelecturesonlineandproblemsetsintheclassroom.html

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
AOtoshi(2) Disputed
1 point

I am pleased to hear that you have found flipped learning useful in your setting. I like the idea of the flipped classroom, however, I do not believe it is beneficial for students in all settings. Although it may save time in the classroom, it is only effective if all students buy into the learning that occurs at home. It sounds like flipped learning is more beneficial as a supplement to learning than fully incorporating it into the classroom/home environment. Also, students may have the opportunity to watch lessons over and over again, but rewatching it numerous times does not necessarily mean students will eventually understand the content. Providing additional and supplemental materials can help struggling learners and enrich learning for the advanced learners, but if students are not self-motivated, these resources are useless. The flipped classroom did not yield significant test results with students due to the failed attempt to implement the flipped classroom (Hennessy, 2012). Although I like the idea of flipped learning, and how it shifts learning to be more student-centered, it is only effective with student buy-in and careful planning and execution (Educause, 2012). My high school math teacher implemented the flipped classroom one semester and although it was a different way of learning, the content was not differentiated at home and I often found myself bored in class because I finished the assignments early. I was able to help other classmates who were struggling, but there was not enough time to help them fully understand the content. For the students in my class who had no motivation to learn, they struggled to keep up in the classroom and ultimately fell behind.

References:

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. [PDF document]. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Hennessy, M. (2012, August 10). New Study on the Flipped Classroom by Concordia Portland’s Dr. Jeremy Renner Shows Mixed Results. [web log comment]. Retrieved from: https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/students-faculty-alumni/new-study-on-the-flipped-classroom-by-concordias-dr-jeremy-renner-shows-mixed- results/

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
ERusso(3) Disputed
1 point

Hennessy admits that the model wasn't implemented properly, so his findings are not proof that flipped classrooms do not work.

I think that many of your arguments against flipped classroom, are actually arguments for it. Although it there is no one strategy that is beneficial for students in all settings, flipped classroom may be beneficial for some or many, and students should have the chance to learn that way if it is best for them. All instruction is only as effective as student buy-in allows. It's our job to create and cultivate student buy-in. Rewatching a lesson multiple times does not mean that they will master content. That's what the class time is used for. In a flipped classroom, teachers have to constantly be observing and collecting data from their students in order to respond appropriately to their instructional needs. They also need to create a culture of learning (Flipped Learning Network, 2014).

There is never any one-size-fits all instruction, but flipped learning may be something new and exciting for you and your students, and it might just reach someone who we previously thought was unreachable. Why not try something different to see how the kids respond?

Eric Russo

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
cfado(3) Disputed
1 point

Hi Eric,

I think it is important to differentiate between flipping learning and flipped classrooms because they are not the same, as argued in the Flipped Learning Network article (2014). Did you have a flipped classroom for ELA or just flipped learning? Were your students working on direct instruction outside of classtime?

I do not think that it is always beneficial for direct instruction to move "from the group learning space to the individual space" (Flipped Learning Network, 2014).

In my own instruction, I am not the only leader during direct instructional time. My students are fully involved throughout the lesson. Other students benefit from hearing student questions. Effective teachers use formative assessment to adjust instruction during direct instructional time. Techniques such as small groupings can be used so students do not waste time.

Additionally, direct instruction does not always need to come before indirect instruction. I like to teach Math using discovery lessons. Students discover new topics by building upon their knowledge of what they already know. At the end of the lesson, we have a discussion and I adapt my instruction to meet observed needs. My students learn from one another during this instructional time. Students can learn a lot through models of other students' misconceptions, as well as of other students' successes. My students sometimes discover without my support that their thinking was a misconception. Lecturing or using direct instruction before groupwork may rob students of the power of collaborating with teammates to discover new concepts.

Carolyn Fado

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
ERusso(3) Disputed
1 point

Hi Carolyn,

I have used both techniques in different classes and for different purposes.

I agree with much of what you said. Direct instruction does not always have to come before an activity, effective teachers do use formative assessment to adjust instruction, kids do benefit from working with one another, and hearing the questions fo others. All of these things can still happen in a flipped classroom, with more time discussions, questions, discovery, or group work. There is nothing that says you can't give the students the flipped direct instruction after they have gone through the group and discovery activities. It also does not have to be an all or nothing strategy. Some lessons or concepts may lend themselves better to a flipped video than others, and some may be outside of the traditional lecture. You might use EdPuzzle to embed questions into a short documentary to build background knowledge prior to a lesson, for example. Then, your lesson can start right off with a discussion based on their comments and questions.

I think with some more planning and reflection, you would find some ways that flipped classroom would integrate with and even enhance some of your already outstanding practices.

Eric Russo

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Jane Andrews - Section ED893.645.91.SU18

A successful flipped classroom challenges students to take responsibility for their learning but providing opportunities for students to engage with the curriculum on much higher levels. In class learning engagements build on the content delivered through the flip and push students to make connections, transfer skills and knowledge and generally do much more than remember what a teacher has said in order to pass a test.

In a successful flipped classroom teachers use advanced approaches to teaching and learning to match student’s natural curiosity and development in the context of today’s connected society. A successful flipped classroom moves well beyond some of the more traditional classroom practices of passively consuming information, memorization devoid of context, isolation rather than collaboration, and lack of timely feedback. In an increasingly connected society where students are challenged and entertained as they interact with others and have a strong sense of agency outside of school, a transformation of pedagogy is required and a successful flipped classroom has advanced pedagogy and practices happening continuously.

A successful flipped classroom provides rich, meaningful contexts for learning where student engagement is deep and long lasting, thus less susceptible to distractions that are more interesting than schoolwork. In a successful flipped classroom deeper learning and integration of skills and dispositions in order to effectively establish goals, monitor progress towards goals and reflect on the learning process are at the center of the learning process, not a wished for by product.

Among the several potential obstacles that might affect the implementation of implementing flipped learning, the most formidable and that which deserves the most attention is teacher habits, skill level and the anxiety that accompanies any process of change. Bergmann & Sams (2014) state “What is the biggest hurdle in implementing flipped learning: flipping the minds of teachers.” (p. 18) as they argue that ample time must be given to teachers to make the transition away from lecturing toward more engaging teaching practices. Along with time, teachers must be given enough support, on an individual level, to experience success early and often. For many teachers, the process of flipping their classroom will mean they have to relearn how to teach and integrate the purposeful use of technology. They will need emotional support throughout this process of productive failure and should also be given given significant support throughout the planning process to ensure they have active and engaging learning regularly occurring in their classrooms.

Teacher pedagogy and practice need to change. Any change creates some resistance and change that involves considering one’s own beliefs about teaching and learning is the most challenging. Teachers may also feel they do not have the creativity necessary to successfully flip a classroom and will need support from the school leadership team. Lastly, there will be an increase in workload for teachers which could also be a big hurdles. Working collaboratively with colleagues to share resources and ideas and having the support of a strong ICT and Pedagogical Leadership team can help alleviate the stress and burden of the increased workload.

Increased engagement and motivation are experienced when classrooms are flipped as students spend class time working collaboratively or interacting with the teacher instead of listening to lectures. Accountability is higher because students must be prepared for the interactive in class sessions; they cannot hide in the back of the room pretending to understand. A flipped classroom is easier for teachers to differentiate. Once students have the self-regulatory skills and understand what is expected of them, they can move at a pace that fits their learning needs and interest levels. In class time is focused on deeper learning and higher order thinking instead of listening. Lastly, there are opportunities for students to develop a wider range of capacities such as leadership and debating skills through interactive, hands on classroom activities.

Teachers will need a range of resources and support before implementing a flipped classroom. There is a great deal of preparation needed before a teacher begins and it is well worth spending the time before starting, even if a teacher begins the process on a small scale. Teachers will need books and other resources that explain the theory of the shifting pedagogy as well as resources that contain suggested face to face learning engagements that can be utilized instead of lecture. If a teacher has been lecturing in class for 20 years, they will need to make significant changes to their pedagogy. These resources will create a professional library for teachers to use for planning purposes.

Teachers will also need training and support on how to use the technology required to flip a classroom; for example: how to use a LMS, how to create screencasts/video lectures, how to use apps like edpuzzle to increase accountability when watching videos. Ideally, a teacher would participate in a flipped classroom as a learner before they begin with their students. Professional development modules can be created to allow them to experience flipped learning first hand so they have a better understanding of the pitfalls they may encounter. Two resources specific to Flipped learning that I would recommend are by Bergman and Sams, the two speakers in the Edutopia (2014) video: Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. (2012) and Flipped learning: Gateway to student achievement. (2014). The first provides a detailed overview of the traditional classroom flip and the second moves the bar higher and challenges teachers to move beyond assigning video lectures for homework.

References

Acedo, M. (2018, February 19). 10 Pros and cons of a flipped classroom. Teachthought Retrieved from https://www.teachthought.com/learning/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/

Bergmann, J. & Sams, A., (2014). Flipped learning: Gateway to student achievement. Washington, DC. International Society for Technology in Education.

Bergmann, J. & Sams, A., (2014). Flipped learning: Gateway to student achievement. Washington, DC. International Society for Technology in Education.

Cornell University (n.d.). Flipping the classroom. Retrieved from https://www.cte.cornell.edu/teaching-ideas/designing-your-course/flipping-the-classroom.html.

Edutopia. [Edutopia]. (2014, November 10). The flipped class: Is flipping for everyone? [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAWidtL7pKE

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Hi, everyone –

Flipped learning is a truly effective instructional strategy that helps spur higher-order thinking of students who take charge of their learning. While I think flipped learning would be difficult to implement for a teacher like me -- who teaches 10th-grade special-education students who may not receive needed extra support when working at home (and who may not have computers at home), who has to heed the pre-determined grade-level curriculum fairly closely, and who works with co-teachers for some classes -- it nonetheless is a powerful way to deliver instruction.

For reference sake, the Flipped Learning Network defines flipped learning as “a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and the resulting group space is transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter.” This network has four pillars for flipped learning: flexible environment, learning culture, intentional content, and professional educator (Flipped Learning Network, 2014). EDUCAUSE, meanwhile, offers a simple definition of a flipped classroom, saying: “the term is widely used to describe almost any class structure that provides prerecorded lectures followed by in-class exercises (EDUCAUSE, 2012).”

Yes, flipped learning is not easy to implement. “Although the idea is straightforward, an effective flip requires careful preparation,” EDUCAUSE acknowledges. “Recording lectures requires effort and time on the part of faculty, and out-of-class and in-class elements must be carefully integrated for students to understand the model and be motivated to prepare for class. As a result, introducing a flip can mean additional work and may require new skills for the instructor, although this learning curve could be mitigated by entering the model slowly.”

But weigh these (and other) drawbacks of flipped learning against its benefits: students can learn “lecture” material better by pausing and rewinding videos watched out of class (which helps considering research shows learners often become distracted after 10 minutes of receiving new material); class time is freed for students to work in groups/experiment and for teachers to correct students’ errors in thinking/analysis (and give struggling students extra support); and students collaborate and communicate with each other (rather than primarily with the teacher) about knowledge to which they have direct access (Goodwin et al, 2013). As EDUCAUSE puts it: “What the flip does particularly well is to bring about a distinctive shift in priorities -- from merely covering material to working toward mastery of it (EDUCAUSE, 2012).”

When deciding whether I would write this post in favor of or against flipped learning, I was swayed by the following statement by proponents Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, both teachers: “We have purposely tried to make our classes places where students carry out meaningful activities instead of completing busywork. When we respect our students in this way, they usually respond. They begin to realize -- and for some it takes time -- that we are here to guide them in their learning instead of being authoritative pedagogues (Bergman et al, 2012).” I never want to be an authoritative pedagogue.

Thanks!

Emelie Rutherford

References:

Flipped Learning Network. (2014). What is flipped learning? The four pillars of F-L-I-P. Retrieved from http://flippedlearning.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/FLIPhandoutFNL_Web.pdf

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Why you should flip your classroom. In Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day (pp. 19–33). Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112060/chapters/Why-You-Should-Flip-Your-Classroom.aspx

Goodwin, B., & Miller, K. (2013). Research says/evidence on flipped classrooms is still coming in. Technology-Rich Learning, 70, 78–80. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar13/vol70/num06/Evidence-on-Flipped-Classrooms-Is-Still- Coming-In.aspx

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Hi Emelie - You've raised some good arguments in support of flipped learning. I believe the Bergmann and Sams (2012) quote you referenced "make our classes places where students carry out meaningful activities instead of completing busywork" is at the heart of a successful flipped learning environment. If teachers only record a "stand and deliver" lecture and expect students to listen at home as they do in a traditional classroom, then the flip is not necessarily worthwhile. A complete shift in pedagogy is needed in order to truly innovate using a flipped model "where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter" (EDUCAUSE, 2012). Much thought and training need to take place in order to effectively flip a learning environment and capitalize on the time gained by moving away from a lecture-based approach to teaching and learning. Increased engagement and motivation are experienced when classrooms are flipped as students spend class time working collaboratively or interacting with the teacher instead of listening to lectures. Teachers will need a range of resources that explain the theory of the shifting pedagogy as well as resources that contain suggested face to face learning engagements that can be utilized instead of lecture. If a teacher has been lecturing in class for 20 years, they will need to make significant changes to their pedagogy and a plan to flip classrooms must take into account the need to re-train teachers as they shift their pedagogy.

References

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Why you should flip your classroom. In Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day (pp. 19–33). Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112060/chapters/Why-You-Should-Flip-Your-Classroom.aspx

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

While skeptical at first I can now confidently say that I think the flipped classroom model is an effective strategy to increase student learning. The flipped model allows for students to synthesize information and implement it in real-world settings. (Educause, 2012) The classroom goes from a place where the teacher expects students to be passive learners to an environment focused on collaboration and cultivation of ideas. (Educause, 2012) Beyond this, it is integral that we also change our practice in order to reflect the needs of today's students and set them up to be technologically literate. The flipped model helps students perfect skills that will set them up for success in future job markets. Through the utilization of technology as a primary component educators can better connect to the interests and learning styles of students. (Bergman & Sams, 2012) The flipped classroom also allows for students and teachers to engage in more meaningful interaction. Through cutting back on lecturing in class teachers can have higher leverage conversations with students in turn assisting relationship building and classroom management. (Bergman & Sams, 2012) Through using flipped models we can increase student 21st century skills and increase student higher level thinking.

Evan Combs ED.893.645.9B.SU18

References:

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Why you should flip your classroom. In Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day (pp. 19–33). Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112060/chapters/Why-You-Should-Flip-Your-Classroom.aspx

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

I hate to play the fence during this debate, though I am approaching a flipped classroom through the lens of an educator whose students have access to technology at home. I think through the shift in education we begin to see a more student-centered approach. We also see the power in student inquiry. Through a flipped classroom a teacher would serve more as a facilitator that helps students navigate their learning; opposed to a classroom that is led by a teacher. Through a teacher-led classroom, we see the restrictions and boundaries that are in place. Students are restricted to fall within the boundaries of a lesson. Some students are unable to enrich their learning and other students are forced to keep up without fulling grasping these new concepts. Through a flipped classroom students are able to keep themselves accountable for their learning in addition to learning in a way that is genuine to their needs as students.

Kaelin Tancayo

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Designing and Delivering Online and Blended Learning Environments

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

In classes where a large volume of content must be covered, such as AP History courses where the course articulation alone is a book of 115 pages, the flipped classroom can be a godsend for teachers who wish to balance content and skills. Without a flipped classroom, it would perhaps feel necessary at times to switch to a completely lecture-based class, which often leads to confused and bored students. With a flipped classroom students take the time they need at home to learn the basic facts of the time period being studied, they can spend their time in class doing the real work of historians. Students become more engaged in the material because the material becomes a way for students to engage in investigation and debate. From personal experience, when I fully leaned in to the flipped classroom model, my AP pass rate doubled. Careful planning was required however for it to truly be a success. I have a dedicated Google Drive for students to download all of the resources they need if they have limited internet access at home, or simply do not know where they are sleeping that night (all of my students are issued a laptop by the school). I also have daily homework quizzes to keep students accountable as well as allowing me to gauge where students are in terms of mastery. The one drawback to flipped learning in my experience is that my students have a hard time connecting multiple nights of homework into one larger narrative, an essential in history class. I have bridged this divide in my classroom by doing one twenty-minute lecture a week to help them sum up what has happened in their learning throughout the week. I also keep office hours for students to come in and work with me on their homework if they are confused or need extra assistance. I also have a class GroupMe so I am reachable to students (and they can reach each other) if there are any problems with the day’s homework assignment). Although the move to flipped learning is a big step for students every year, they ultimately see the benefit and reap the rewards of the system. With appropriate supports, flipped learning can benefit students tremendously.

Margaret Carraway

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Margaret, yes I agree that a flipped classroom would benefit an AP classroom. AP courses are college courses and require that students come with the mentality that they are going to work hard in order to succeed. Do you think that this model of teaching would work in a standard classroom? A classroom that does is not an honors or college (prep) course? I do not think it would be as effective.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
mcarraway(3) Clarified
0 points

I agree, which is why my post is about the benefits of a flipped classroom in honors and AP environments.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Using the flipped classroom method is an invaluable tool for educators who teach adults. The pressures of work, taking care of family, and other obstacles make it difficult for adults to attend face-to-face classes as often as they might like to. When they can come to the classroom, it's important that that time be used for active learning, group project work, and methods that can help the instructor assess where the students are in understanding the content of the course. - Louise Carroll, ED 893.645.91.SU18.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

I believe that at least some flipping is helpful in a classroom with multiple grade levels, such as my self-contained 1st and 2nd grade class. Although all classrooms have students working at different proficiency levels, with different grade levels it is important that students all have access to the general education curriculum at their actual grade level. This is especially challenging in math because the CCSS do not spiral and I am required to follow a specific sequence and timeline for each unit. While first graders are working on measurement, second graders might be working on place value. I cannot meaningfully combine those into a whole group lesson. I also don't have time in my schedule to teach a full lesson for each grade level every day following the district plan. I do have a para-educator, but he is not trained in the curriculum and we don't have planning time together. So I use some targeted flipping using the technology I have available in my classroom. Students can use their "center time" to learn the basic content from an interactive video on Zearn either the day before or earlier the same day. Then when they have time to work with me in a small group, they have a basic familiarity and are ready to practice and do some problem-solving. They do not have to have access to technology at home because I give them time in class. This works for me, but might not work for everyone. This allows them to work at their own pace through the lesson, and they receive correction as they work the problems in the interactive lesson. I also have used this for a twice-exceptional gifted student in my class to work on above-level curriculum at his own pace. Because they are working on the iPads or computers, they can also make as many mistakes as they need to make without worrying about what other people think.

Cheyanne Vanderdonckt ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

I am a supporter of the flipped learning model because I believe it has a positive impact on the mindset that teachers take when teaching a course. Flipped classrooms require a change in the role of the teacher. As stated in the EdPuzzle "The Flipped Classroom Model" video, "the teacher serves as a coach, mentor and guide helping the students access this knowledge." To me, this is a much healthier mindset for a teacher to take as it forces them to get to know their students to help the students through the class material more effectively.

Flipped classrooms also steer teachers away from taking a "my way or the highway" mentality towards the learning process. As a physics and chemistry teacher, I find it difficult to present all the different ways to solve a problem while lecturing in class. I had a student last school year who, on the surface, would seem to be a weak student and struggled a lot. But after working with him and helping him through the logic of a problem in one of our units later in the course, he found a solution that made more sense to him, which gave him confidence.

I hope to pursue the flipped model so struggling students can get the attention they need from me, and to give them the opportunity to figure out the material for themseleves, which will foster a deeper understanding and a better experience in my class.

Theodore (Alex) DeWeese (ED.893.645.91.SU18)

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Flipped Classrooms are what will allow teachers to be teachers and students to take charge of their own learning. It will help with differentiation, collaboration, higher order work, engagement and social equity. None of that matters to the doubters. Why? Because of the two arguments that always arise.

The main argument against a Flipped Classroom is that many of the students we serve will not have access to the technology in their homes and will be unable to do the "homework". This is poppycock (great throwback word...19th Century I believe)! One of the main ideas or pillars behind the Flipped Classroom is to allow for flexible learning environment (Flipped Learning Network, 2014). So let's discuss what that flexibility can look like. Today's cell phones are incredibly powerful, and can work with flipped apps. No internet access? If students don't have access at home, have them do their "homework" at the beginning of class. That's what a friend of mine who taught at Dunbar for several years told me he did when he flipped his class. Or, don't have homework at all and create a blended/flipped classroom using groups/stations. I started to play with this at the end of last year. I worked with my students who were struggling or well below grade level first while my sharp shooters worked the laptops (I had not gone robust yet like our EdPuzzle demo). For the most part, it was very successful.

The other great misconception is that a Flipped Classroom is flipped every day. The fear behind this, and understandably, is that a front-loaded workload will be overwhelming for the teacher. This does not have to be the case. Flipping could be daily, but could be once a week. Again, this goes back to the pillar of Flexible Environment. The goal is to free the teacher to answer and challenge the students while in class and to get away from the lecture model where only a few of the students typically stay actively engaged. Speaking from experience, that model no longer works, and the work that is not done on the front end will be done during class, only instead of using positive energy to facilitate student learning, one ends up using negative energy trying to manage a class because most of the students are not engaged. I can't tell you how often I have felt that it is my job to keep these students interested and how frustrated I become when they don't respond.

Flipped Learning Network. (2014). What is flipped learning? The four pillars of F-L-I-P. Retrieved from http://flippedlearning.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/FLIP handoutFNL_Web.pdf

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Initially, I felt as if utilizing the flipped classroom model was a risky approach, but now I can see the benefits of using the flipped classroom model as a teacher. I am sometimes skeptical of trying new approaches since many of students do not have access to technology or any resources that set them up to be successful in new teaching approaches. However, as a teacher who pushes to make students the center of their own learning experiences, the flipped classroom model allows instructors/teachers to do just that. After reading the articles from this session, it’s evident that having a flipped classroom doesn’t always mean integrating technology outside of the classroom. Teachers simply diverge the focus on the student outcomes and involving students in their own learning process. Moving the focus from the teacher to the student allows them to take on an active role in their education, collaborating with others, solving multi-step problems, rather than listening to teachers for a 60 minute period. Although, planning a flipped lesson can require a lot of prep since many teachers do not have the means or resources to create such lessons easily, this approach can surely create an effective classroom.

Kayleigh Concepcion

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Designing and Delivering Online and Blended Learning Environments

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

The flipped platform is a useful platform in the classroom because it promotes student independence/accountability, maximizing class time,and self-paced learning. With this platform allowing students to access the content outside of the classroom it helps to reinforce student confidence in regard to academic success in the classroom. Although student have to adjust to this model because it is very different from the traditional face to face model it is a great opportunity for them to experience this blended learning style if they ever have to interact with it at another point in their academic journey. While traditional classroom teaching has been very successful it is important that educators continue to find tools that will continue to increase student growth.Therefore, making course content easily accessible outside of class will allow students to become familiar at their own pace and not feel forced to have to only understand it during the scheduled class period. The flipped platform gives flexibility to both teachers and students.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

The Flipped Classroom is an instructional method that leads to authentic differentiation in and out of the classroom. Flipped Learning Network designed flipped learning as when "direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and the resulting group space is transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter" (2014). The Flipped Classroom allows students to learn the lesson at their own pace, and engage with the content in a deeper level in class. Although technology is often associated with flipped learning, it is not necessary. Constant formative assessments outside of class and in class allows the activity and materials to be tailored to the students' needs.

Another benefit of the Flipped Classroom is the more responsibility of learning are placed on students' shoulders (Educause, 2012). This pushes students to learn how to learn. This works on students' habits of mind.

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Flipped Learning Network. (2014). What is flipped learning? The four pillars of F-L-I-P. Retrieved from http://flippedlearning.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/FLIP handoutFNL_Web.pdf

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Many people confuse flipped classrooms with flipped learning. Although they are related they are not exactly the same things. Flipped learning is about Flexible Environment, Learning Culture, Intentional Content and Professional Educator (Flipped Learning Network, 2014). Flexible environment means being willing to change the classroom both physically and/or routines for the sake of creative and different learning experiences. Learning Culture refers helping students realize that they have ownership over their own learning and it is not solely in the hands of their teacher. Intentional Content means continually and consistently thinking about the flipped learning. Not just engaging in flipped learning because it seems like a next great pedagogical trend. Lastly Professional Educator refers to teachers taking ownership of the involved role in flipped learning. Flipped learning cannot happen without a dedicated educator at the helm. Flipped learning is about taking the knowledge away from solely the teacher and more in the hands of the students. With this perspective in mind, it becomes easier to understand how the following pros from Bergmann and Sams "Flip Your Classroom":

-helps busy students

-helps struggling students

-helps students of all abilities to excel

-allows students to pause and rewind their teacher

-increases student-teacher interaction

-allows teachers to know their students better

-changes classroom management

-changes the way we talk to parents

-educates parents

-makes your class transparent

Although Flipped Learning may seem difficult and challenging to implement, when doing the readings, I realized, that although I don't engage in flipped learning all the time, it has certainly made an appearance in my classroom. Giving students more opportunity to practice, work with their peers and spending less time lecturing to students took time to become comfortable with, but was worth it. Guiding students instead of lecturing students makes a huge impact and one that I am going to spend more time trying to implement in my classroom this fall.

Olivia Rauss

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Why you should flip your classroom. In Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day (pp. 19–33). Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112060/chapters/Why-You-Should-Flip-Your-Classroom.aspx

Flipped Learning Network. (2014). What is flipped learning? The four pillars of F-L-I-P. Retrieved from http://flippedlearning.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/FLIP handoutFNL_Web.pdf

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Molly Mus, ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Hi all! I incorporate flipped learning in my own classroom and am here ready to dispel 2 of the arguments against flipped learning with my own anecdotes from implementation experience. For background knowledge - I teach students with emotional disturbances in my city's lowest performing public high school in a self-contained setting. They do not have access to computers at home, nor do they have internet. In fact, this is the most "at-risk" population that the city serves, as over 20% of them experience chronic homelessness. These students are succeeding in my classroom due to a mix of flipped learning for content acquisition and project-based learning (PBL) to utilize said content with higher-order Bloom's. Here we go:

1: "Flipped learning reduces the necessity for note taking, with negative effects on student performance" (Maycock, 2018). This is an interesting implication, because I require my students to learn how to write Cornell notes by utilizing curated materials such as videos, readings at various levels, online interactives, podcasts, and quizzes to check for understanding prior to test time. I have non-readers with extremely poor writing skills in my classroom that benefit immensely from the practical use of Cornell notes. If you'd like to see my "study guides", please see the attached link.

2: Flipped learning has not worked for me because of a lack of "technology, amount of time/responsibilities a student has and internet access at home" (Fuchs, 2018). The issue of internet access/devices at home is one that I hear educators bring up, and rightly so. When I first started flipping, I required that my students completed content acquisition at home. I shortly realized that I was asking my students to prioritize homework over finding their next meal, and had to rethink my game plan right away. Now my students engage in what is called "in-class flipping", where the flipped learning is a center that students rotate through while I work one-to-one with students struggling to apply content knowledge acquired from this in PBL work. Students are still responsible for engaging in this work, and now have a safe space to do so.

To conclude, it should be noted that all students that attended my class proved mastery using competency-based grading with flipped learning and project-based learning utilized throughout the entire year. In fact, I had one student that took 2 of my classes the year before (without flipped learning/PBL) and failed, even with one-to-one assistance, flexible pacing, and scaffolding. This year, he earned an A in one class and a C+ in the other learning the same content as the year before. He was actually asked to complete much more rigorous work this school year in relation to the content being learned. This is just one example of success!

References:

Fuchs, L. (2018, June 7). In Twitter. Retrieved July 13, 2018, from https://twitter.com/DCWard7teacher/status/1012815072303960064

Maycock, K. W., Lambert, J., & Bane, D. (2018, June 7). Flipping learning not just content: A 4‐year action research study investigating the appropriate level of flipped learning. J Comput Assist Learn.

Supporting Evidence: Ms. Mus's Study Guide for Flipped Learning Center (drive.google.com)
Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

A flipped learning model allows for students to move at their own pace and take part in learning that is just right for them. By utilizing the innumerable learning videos available online, teachers can free up their own time for differentiation within the classroom by allowing students to work ahead if need be while they focus on intervention with students who need it. An important feature to note, as well, is that flipped learning has the power to teach students self-monitoring with a teacher's help. How powerful that students can go back and re-watch a video if they don't understand? In the right context, teachers can help students understand that their learning is in their own hands, and students can feel empowered to take their time to fully understand each concept presented. With the right teacher messaging, flipped learning has the potential to create independently motivated learners, and a deeply differentiated classroom.

Amanda Pucheu

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Although the Flipped Classroom Model has been shown to be beneficial in many ways, one of the most significant downfalls is the immense learning curve for both instructors and students. Due to the fact that the Flipped Model differs greatly from traditional "face to face" teaching and learning, instructors must be able to successfully encourage the students to "buy-in" from inception. Moreover, the instructor must take additional time to adequately prepare in advance for the multitude of lectures and activities through multimedia integration that is necessary for an effective Flipped Classroom model. If the instructor is able to execute the preparation successfully, they must also be prepared to convince students that the in-person component is necessary for true and meaningful learning, even though the student might think that they have learned enough through the independent "at home" portion of the lecture. Hence, the fear is that students might not completely engage in the Flipped Classroom model if they feel that they were able to learn all that they need to know at home through the presentations given by the professor (EDUCAUSE, 2012).

References

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from [https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf]

Brooke Shine

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
DEbisuya(2) Disputed
1 point

Aloha e Brooke,

You raise a valid concern regarding the engagement of students within the flipped learning model. Though there is always a possibility that students may feel they have mastered the content just from reviewing the materials at home, the activities provided in-person should function to assess and challenge students. By creatively designing activities that are constructivist and active, teachers can actually help students to "do" the learning in class together by putting into practice the concepts learned at home. In this way, the in-class activities do not just become redundant, but rather reinforcing.

Me ka ʻoiaʻiʻo,

Denise

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
Rosiecb(4) Disputed
1 point

Hello,

I do agree that the learning curve is a potential barrier in using the flipped classroom. However, I wonder if its responsible not to do something that has long term benefits just because it will be difficult in the short term?

Even if the learning curve takes a month, students can use those new skills throughout the rest of their school career and beyond. For example, if a student struggled with their first flipped classroom in middle school, that struggle will most like be gone by the time they enter high school and beyond.

It would be difficult to execute in the beginning; however, should that negate all the long-term benefits.

Rose Brown

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
adeweese(2) Clarified
1 point

I do agree with your point that there is a big learning curve for both instructors and students when administering a flipped classroom. I have a colleague who uses a flipped-mastery model, and the "buy-in" you spoke of is tough for some students and parents.

While this learning curve can be a hindrance to some, I would argue that this could also be a useful opportunity for growth for instructors and students by emphasizing the idea of "learning how to learn." Giving students multiple paths to pursue while learning will likely lead some students to find out what their weaknesses are. With the right guidance from a teacher, these students may have more in-depth experiences with the material because they had to think critically about how they will best learn specific topics.

Theodore (Alex) DeWeese (ED.893.645.91.SU18)

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

I agree that flipped learning saves instructional time and helps students move at their own pace. However, I struggle with the implementation of flipped learning because it requires students to access technology outside of school. This is an unfair expectation for families that do not have technology or high-speed internet at home (Nielsen, 2011 & EDUCAUSE, 2012). Many of my students have family members who cannot use technology at a local library because they lack transportation or are concerned about their immigration status. Another challenge is that parents might have a variety of opinions on how much homework or screen time children should have outside of school (Nielsen, 2011). I believe it is important for me to respect the values and opinions of my students' families.

In order to successfully implement a flipped classroom, the school would need to provide technology access (devices and internet) to families who don’t have access at home and all parents would need to be equally on board for allowing their child (in my case a 5-6 year old) to frequently complete homework online after school. Recognizing that these are fairly significant barriers to implementation, I am more excited about what Nielson suggests - providing time for students to access online lessons during the school day (Nielson, 2011).

References:

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Nielsen, L. (2011, October 8). Five Reasons I'm Not Flipping Over The Flipped Classroom. Retrieved July 8, 2018, from https://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/ 10/five-reasons-im-not-flipping-over.html

Tracy Kimball ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
2 points

Technology access is definitely an issue that we need to explore. With the help of head phones in class, that should not be a problem. Additionally, a teacher could play the video on a power point projector and provide small groups with their own group laptop to still have the opportunity to replay, ec. We can also encourage students to get library cards, etc. also to help solve this issue and give students multiple nights to complete video assignments.

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
DCorrigan(3) Disputed
1 point

You bring up a solid argument with technology being an issue. Are there alternatives should the technological resources not be available, so that components of a flipped classroom could still be implemented? Although a flipped classroom has its pros, it should be combined with other pedagogical approaches and meet the students where they are at, even if that means modification due to technology concerns. Perhaps printed reading materials, labs, etc. may combat the tech issue but still allow for students to receive some of the benefits of a flipped classroom model.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Tracy, I support your point on the cost of flipped classrooms. It was part of my comment too.

I would like to add that once we move outside the West, and school budgets drop dramatically (as in my own schools in India), these challenges become even greater.

The idea of doing online lessons in the day is a good one, but I guess it comes at the cost of the 'Flexibility' that is a key component of flipped learning.

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

Although flipped learning has crucial benefits, I truly believe that it takes special learners to thrive in this type of educational set up. Speaking from my own experience, I find implementing flipped learning into elementary school could be extremely challenging, especially with the circumstances at my own school. First, I think that there must be complete buy-in from not only the students but also the parents. There are many students at my school who are either unmotivated themselves but also come from families that unfortunately do not value education. My team and I have struggled for years trying to problem solve to figure out how to get students to complete their homework but also involve parents in the process when possible. Another problem that my school encounters is that there is minimal access to technology at home for these children. The most access that students come into contact with is a smart phone. Most students do not have wifi, so I would see parents being very hesitant to use their data on letting their kids watch videos and such. Lastly, even if there were more technology at home I would be hesitant to implement this style of learning because at my school there is always a large group of students who do not complete their homework. I could see it causing many problem when a group of students did not do their learning at home and are not ready for the day to begin the critical thinking and development of the skill. Although I absolutely love this idea and wish that I could make it work, I just do not see it happening due to the above challenges. I am going to be working with a small group of students who have been identified as gifted next year. I could see myself trying the flipped learning style with these students so that when I do pull them out for enrichment, they would have previously had exposure to the concept and we could proceed from there.

Kelsey Elliott

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
EricRusso(3) Disputed
1 point

Hello Kelsey,

I would agree that the flipped learning would be stronger with parental support and involvement, and that it would be more challenging in an elementary school, at least prior to grades where students may be carrying their own devices. In terms of your arguments against flipped, technology today will allow students to watch video content on phones so full access to computers and wi-fi are no longer necessary.

It's a broad stroke to say that families do not value education. In my experience, many of the struggling students have families that value education heavily, but don't have the capacity to support their children the way that they want to, whether due to work schedule, lack of education, or other responsibilities. This type of HW gives parents the opportunity to actually help their child, as opposed to them completing a math problem that they don't know how to solve, or a reading a text that is too challenging.

In terms of students not doing HW, you cannot compare to directly to the HW that would be completed in a Flipped classroom. A student is less likely to go home and write an essay, or ready two chapters, than they would be to watch a 5-7 minute video and take notes or complete a short summarizer. So the task becomes more manageable in the eyes of the students. Secondly, why should students who do more, like watch the videos in advance, be held back because others choose not to?The ones who watch can move on, which will actually free you up to provide more support to the ones who are not.

I think it is a great idea to try it out with a small group, but I would implore you to consider that if it works, it isn't because you were working with a "gifted" group. This model can work with all types of learners, not simply "special" learners. One of the pillars of Flipped learning is being a professional educator. This includes "collaborating and reflecting with other educators and taking responsibility for transforming your practice" (Flipped Learning Network, 2014). I am confident, that with work and collaboration, you would be able to successfully implement flipped learning in your classroom.

Eric Russo

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
Kellio15(9) Clarified
1 point

Hi Eric,

I was not targeting this group of gifted learners due to the fact that they are a "gifted". I fully understand that this model benefits all learners. As I transition to a new role, I thought it would be more practical for me to work out the kinks with a smaller group than to try to tackle this with the class of over 30 while simultaneously learning this new position. As I said, I truly wish that I could figure out a way to implement this approach but given my given circumstances at this time I do not see it being done effectively. In the future, as we grow our own technology inventory and continue to work with our community I would love to transition to this model.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
ktancayo(2) Disputed
1 point

Hey Kelsey,

It was difficult for me to choose a side when determining whether a flipped classroom was beneficial or not. I too agree when you say that it requires a special learner to thrive in this type of setting. Although, I do feel that a flipped classroom presents a tailored curriculum and approach when it comes to our students. Rather than teach our students through the perspective of a single mind. A flipped classroom allows our learners to learn in a way that would benefit them specifically. Also another point you made resonated with me; access seems to be a problem in itself and having parent investment in this type of learning would also be difficult. I believe that it is difficult for parents to invest themselves in this type of approach because it is something unfamiliar to them. Though I feel with the proper introduction to this style, I feel that parents may be interested when they see how its a more "student-centered" approach.

Kaelin Tancayo

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Designing and Delivering Online and Blended Learning Environments

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Hi Kelsey,

See my post and my previous comment on Tracy's post. I too share the same practical constraints at my schools.

I thought Tracy's suggestion of providing the technology infrastructure in the school and during the school day was a good solution. Your thoughts on that?

Rohan

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

While I believe the flipped learning strategy may be beneficial for some students, as a whole I do not think it can be used effectively throughout k-12 public learning. I work with high school students who lack intrinsic motivation mostly related to severe trauma they have or are experiencing. Coupling the lack of intrinsic motivation with responsibilities such as, caring for sick guardians, younger siblings, living in a group home, or moving to a different homeless shelter. To add to some of my student’s challenges many of them do not have access to technology at home. If students are unable to complete the flipped lecture they can develop feelings of failure and shutdown. Even providing laptops for students to listen to in class would not rectify this, those students who are already unable to complete the work feel like they have failed, then they will feel like they are being singled out and can create a negative classroom culture. Students may feel so overwhelmed like they can never succeed and shutdown without even trying. As shared in the blog post Five Reasons I'm Not Flipping Over The Flipped Classroom “Many of our students don't have access to technology at home. The flipped classroom method does not have strong provisions in place for these children.”(Nielsen. L, 2011). Until something has been done to ensure that all public school children have equal access to equipment and resources necessary for a flipped classroom, I think it would be a disservice for some students educational journey.

Nielsen. L, 2011 retrieved from https://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/ 10/five-reasons-im-not-flipping-over.html

ED.893.645.9A.SU18 Samantha Barreiro

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
Rosiecb(4) Clarified
2 points

Hello,

Another teacher at my school has actually done something about this. She uses the flipped classroom model, but alters it to where students do the online portion in class. I've never sat in or her class, but I be live students get their list of assignments/lessons for the unit and use the classroom laptops to get started. The teacher pulls certain students for extra help when needed. No work is required at home. She just implemented last semester so I'm unsure of the effects, but it was an interesting idea.

Rose Brown

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

I like the idea of having students watch the videos in the classroom. If an educator decided to embark on a flipped classroom model, they would at least have to have the equipment for the children in the classroom. Not having the equipment doesn't seem to be a reasonable argument against the flipped learning model, because it seems as though if there isn't the equipment this isn't a method that could even be considered.

I think when it comes to student motivation and environmental factors causing them to shut down, we can't conclude that this is a reason to not utilize this method. Those issues will have an impact on any kind of learning through any teaching style and need to be addressed through social-emotional programs. I think that some may argue that students may shut down less when they are submitting check-for-understanding questions after a video on the computer and when they are given the choices and freedom that technology allows.

By: Samantha Hutchins ED.893.645.9A

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

This is what I do! No student works on anything at home. The flipped learning is its own center in my class. See the attached article to learn more!

Supporting Evidence: Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The "In-Class" Version (www.edutopia.org)
Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

Hi Samantha,

You bring up important key points on why the flipped classroom model does not work for all students. You are right, a flipped classroom is most ideal for a classroom in which students have access to technology and other resources both at home and at school. It is also most ideal for students that have the self discipline and motivation to complete the at home components of a flipped classroom, provided that they have the time to complete these activities. The reality is that many students living in rural and urban communities are faced with external factors such as working after school to assist their families or taking care of siblings and family members. In these cases, a flipped classroom could potentially cause these students to fall behind. I'm curious to hear anyone's thoughts on if a flipped classroom will close or widen the education achievement gap.

Victoria Cayard

ED.893.645.91.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

Although the Flipped Learning model has stated benefits, research studies have provided conflicting results on whether the model results in statistically significant student achievement. In a study by Dr. Renner and Dr. Johnson, “No significant difference was found between pre- and post-test scores of students who did and did not participate in the flipped classroom approach” (Hennessey, 2012). The fact that these studies show that the Flipped Learning model is not effective in all instances means that there must be improved structures for how to implement Flipped Learning for different types of classrooms. Until these structures are improved and refined, one cannot say that Flipped Learning is effective for all students.

As a science and math teacher, I am trying to steer away from having my students memorize processes and formulas. When students watch videos to receive instruction (we can use Khan Academy math lessons as an example), they are often watching one process of doing a math problem. Lisa Nielsen mentions, "Flipping instruction might end up just meaning we can provide time to do more of the same type of memorization and regurgitation teaching that just doesn't work" (Nielsen, 2011). By providing instruction only through video methods, we risk our students understanding a process instead of the concept.

References:

Hennessey, M.A. (2012, August 10). New Study on the Flipped Classroom by Concordia Portland’s Dr. Jeremy Renner Shows Mixed Results. Retrieved from https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/students-faculty-alumni/new-study-on-the-flipped-classroom-by-concordias-dr-jeremy-renner-shows-mixed-results/

Nielsen, L. (2011, October 8). Five Reasons I'm Not Flipping Over The Flipped Classroom [Blog Post]. Retrieved from https://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/ 10/five-reasons-im-not-flipping-over.html

Rachel Lucero

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
shutch14(3) Disputed
2 points

I would argue that no pedagogical method is effective for all students, but flipped learning is probably effective for more students than traditional methods. Renner and Johnson's study that you've mentioned had a variable group of one half of a high school computer class, while the control was the other half of the same class. When talking about structures that need to be improved for how to implement the classroom, both subjects here were exposed to similar structures. The same building, climate, educators, etc., so this study doesn't demonstrate anything that stands out as noteworthy to me. If we do take this as evidence, it should at least prove that the flipped model didn't harm the students in any way considering there were no differences in the post-test skills but it did expose them to 21st-century practices which may show to benefit them in the future.

Additionally, the math skills that are taught in the videos can be provided through many viewing a plethora of strategies promoting student choice. The students can discover the concepts in small groups in the class on their own by applying the learned skills. If we consider that concepts can be taught and not just discovered through the application process, I'm still not sure how a person could explain a concept in-person any better than it could be done in a video.

By: Samantha Hutchins ED.893.645.9A

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Additionally, no flipped learning classroom should be based in videos only. I force my students to problem-solve while also supporting their inherent wish for more choice by giving them multiple means to acquire content. This includes, but is not limited to, videos, readings at various levels, podcasts, interactive websites, quizlet, and click-and-learns.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
ecombs(3) Disputed
1 point

Rachel,

I absolutely agree that students need to understand the "why" behind math and science concepts. I think that a flipped model would allow for students to engage in procedural practice at home and then in the classroom engage in more hands-on activities to build solid conceptual understanding. The flipped model in my view provides students with the opportunity to engage in higher-order thinking tasks during class time with the teacher as the facilitator.

Best,

Evan Combs

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

I am still skeptical of the flipped classroom. I was introduced to the term last week when my partner and I were deciding on possibilities for our final project. Upon further investigation, of both sides, I am not fully convinced of its merits.

There were a few preoccupations that I had with the flipped classroom that were not assuaged by the reading. To begin with, getting students to complete homework has been an unpredictable battle. There were times when the majority of my class completed it without much of a struggle. There have been other years where it is a constant battle for any completion. I am unconvinced that the simple fact of the homework being the lectures would convince the students to do their homework. What if students still refuse to do homework? I did not hear any mention of what to do when students did not complete the homework they were assigned and, therefore, unprepared for practice problems in class. Second, Hennessy (2012) concluded that there was “No significant difference was found between pre- and post-test scores of students who did and did not participate in the flipped classroom approach.” This was deemed due to a failure in implementing the strategy as opposed to the strategy itself. This makes me wary because implementing the method seems fairly complicated and less intuitive. I would be doing a disservice to my students in implementing a poorly organized flipped classroom that I did not realize was poorly organized until it was too late. Finally, I believe that some of the changes that Bergmann and Sam purported in Chapter 8 of their book were overblown. The picture they painted of the traditional classroom was not accurate. If their traditional classrooms had been organized as they had portrayed, then there is no way that Bergmann would have received a Presidential Award for Teaching. Several of the benefits they claimed, including allowing teachers to know their students better, changes in classroom management and helping busy students, appeared as more of causation than as a result of the flipped classroom. (Bergmann & Sams, 2012)

I will be creating a flipped classroom model for my final project. I am interested to see if my opinion changes as I am working on it.

By Rachael Nyberg-Hampton, ED.893.645.9A

Reference

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Why you should flip your classroom. In Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day (pp. 19–33). Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/112060/chapters/Why-You-Should-Flip-Your-Classroom.aspx

Hennessy, M. (2012, August 10). New Study on the Flipped Classroom by Concordia Portland’s Dr. Jeremy Renner Shows Mixed Results. [blog] Retrieved from https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/students-faculty-alumni/new-study-on-the-flipped-classroom-by-concordias-dr-jeremy-renner-shows-mixed- results/

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
EricRusso(3) Disputed
1 point

Rachel,

You definitely raise some good points. As you note, getting students to complete assignments at home have been a challenge, yet it seems that you are still assigning homework even though that has been the case. Why not try assigning something different. In addition, I had the opportunity to see Sams and Bergman speak in person. They expressed that if students didn't watch the videos at home, they had to watch them in class. Those that did watch got to move ahead into labs and projects, which the motivated the others to watch more are home.

And as for the model not working in Hennessy's article, any strategy that is implemented improperly will not yield good results. We should not avoid practice because it makes us uncomfortable if some of our kids may benefit from it.

I hope that your trepidations change as you work on your project.

Eric Russo

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
lccarroll(2) Disputed
1 point

I understand your skepticism and all your arguments make sense to me. I wonder though, if instead of putting lectures on video for your class, could you develop a game for them to play that would help them move through the material as homework? There are so many great ways to gamify content now, and that way you might see more of the students completing the homework. I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts on this suggestion. Louise Carroll ED 893.645.91.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

The flipped classroom has many educational benefits and if it is carefully planned and implemented in the right setting, I believe it can be successful; however, there are many barriers that make it difficult to implement the flipped classroom successfully. One barrier to implementing the flipped classroom is the lack of access to technology (Nielson, 2011). Not all students have access to a computer or transportation to a library to access technology. If teachers were to implement a flipped classroom, they would need to make sure they provide all students access to technology in order for them to complete the instructional portion at home. Another barrier to the flipped classroom is student and parent buy-in. Because the instructional piece will occur at home, all students need to be self-motivated to watch the videos, read through resources, and interact with the learning materials on their own. Simply assigning it as “homework” does not always motivate students. When I was in high school my math teacher implemented a flipped classroom and it was successful for the students who were self-motivated and watched the instructional videos at home every day, but the students who did not watch the videos struggled to keep up in the classroom. Implementing the flipped classroom would be difficult to implement in the setting I teach because there is no motivation or accountability to learn outside of the school setting. Although homework is assigned daily, the same few students turn in homework completed, and even though parents are made aware of homework that their child brings home, there is no accountability of learning at home. There would need to be a shift in the culture of learning in order to successfully implement the flipped classroom. One of the biggest challenges that prevents the flipped classroom from being effective is the lack of careful preparation it requires (Educause, 2012). Teachers need to provide out-of-class materials that will support all learners, and create in-class elements that engage and challenge students to use what they learned at home in the classroom setting. A study of the flipped classroom showed that there was not a significant difference in test scores of students who did and did not participate in the flipped classroom due to the failed attempt at implementing the flipped classroom (Hennessy, 2012). While the method of the flipped classroom has the potential to yield positive learning results, if it is not carefully planned and implemented appropriately, it may do more harm than good.

References:

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. [PDF document]. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Hennessy, M. (2012, August 10). New Study on the Flipped Classroom by Concordia Portland’s Dr. Jeremy Renner Shows Mixed Results. [web log comment]. Retrieved from: https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/students-faculty-alumni/new-study-on-the-flipped-classroom-by-concordias-dr-jeremy-renner-shows-mixed-results/

Nielson, L. (2011, October 8). Five Reasons I’m not Flipping Over the Flipped Classroom. [web log comment]. Retrieved from: https://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/ 10/five-reasons-im-not-flipping-over.html

Alicyn Otoshi

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
ecombs(3) Disputed
1 point

Alicyn,

I can absolutely understand the frustration of students not taking homework seriously and a lack of support from families. I think that if implemented in an intentional manner the flipped classroom could actually work to address some of these problems. In my understanding the success of the flipped classroom centers around students engaging with highly engaging and often creative tasks during class time. If this is occurring student motivation increases as does the completion of tasks outside of the classroom. Regarding access, if more teachers are able to show the benefits of this practice I think that it will allow for all to better advocate for their student's access to technology.

Best,

Evan Combs

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Flipped classrooms are not effective because they rely on students completing introductory study of material at home, using technology. Not all families have access to technology. Also some students have more difficulty completing homework than others, whether or not the homework is digital. For younger students, some parents may spend time encouraging their kids to complete homework. Other students may have parents who are unable to supervise homework time.

In her blog post, Lisa Nielson (2011) writes that the flipped model still is based on traditional lecture, even if the students are listening to the lecture at home. This form of instruction does not work for every student.

Additionally, EDUCAUSE (2012) writes that students may complain about the loss of face time if they are used to face-to-face lectures and that flipping effectively takes careful planning, which may be overwhelming for teachers.

References:

EDUCAUSE. (2012). Things you should know about… flipped classrooms. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2012/2/eli7081-pdf.pdf

Nielsen, L. (2011, October 8). Five Reasons I'm Not Flipping Over The Flipped Classroom. Retrieved July 8, 2018, from https://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/ 10/five-reasons-im-not-flipping-over.html

Carolyn Fado

ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
aweeks1400(2) Disputed
1 point

Hi Carolyn, I understand your arguments and can see where you are coming from; however, I see many counter arguments to the items mentioned. I agree that a lecture format does not work with all students, but the flipped classroom allows for various media forms to be enacted and today's students are generally attracted to technology and media. Furthermore, students can re-watch, pause, or even fast forward if desired/needed. Then, class time can be utilized for students to question, comment, and deepen understanding of the given lectures (content). Therefore, the flipped classroom and completing introductory work at home actually increases class time spend on mastering content and ultimately standards. Another point brought up was about parents supervising homework time or not. I think this is a time to teach student responsibility, regardless of age. Homework is homework. If a student has homework, it is ultimately up to them to complete it. The teacher can assist with this by increasing and encouraging intrinsic (and maybe extrinsic for younger students) motivation. It would also be the teacher's responsibility to provide differentiated assignments when necessary. I think we need to have confidence in our students' abilities to complete the requirements of a flipped classroom-- at home.

Ashley Weeks

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
mollymus(2) Disputed
1 point

Hi Carolyn,

Your concern of internet/device accessibility in the home is very valid. I'd just like to mention that flipped learning can be used in class as well! The attached article explains it in great detail. All of my students struggled to complete work when I originally assigned it outside of the classroom, so I switched to this model to help alleviate stressors on them as well as to ensure that they were still getting the content. I rely heavily on a centers-style class set-up, and this is one of my centers! It has worked wonders.

Supporting Evidence: Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The "In-Class" Version (www.edutopia.org)
Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

I like the idea behind flipped learning and I think there is value to it. The two biggest things, however, that stop me from supporting it wholeheartedly are the inequity in access to technology in American schools and my belief that schools should minimize the amount of homework assigned.

There should be time after school for students to pursue their interests and hobbies, spend time with families, and relax. A reasonable amount of homework is fair. For example, I often ask my students to read or finish an assignment that we did not have time to complete in class. If I do assign a larger assignment, I like to give them a few days to get it done so that the student takes ownership over its completion.

My fear with flipped classroom is that the actual delivery of content is uniform and simplistic. Yes, the teacher can spend the next day in class reviewing with the student based on that child's need, but the student may feel discouraged or despondent from the very beginning if they did not understand the lesson in the first place at home. It is really hard to assure a student that they can do something once they are convinced that they cannot.

I am a firm believer in diversifying the way we teach and the way students learn. At the same time, I truly believe that teachers need to respect the time of students and families, which is why I would ultimately oppose Flipped Classroom. I think it asks too much of students and families, and it will make learning burdensome. Many students will feel like the amount of class time has doubled, and they will be resistant from the start.

Andrew Avallone

ED.893.645.91.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
emelier(3) Disputed
1 point

Hi, Andrew -

Thanks for your post. In my post I argued in favor of flipped learning, but acknowledged the technology-inequity issue.

You said you believe schools should minimize the amount of homework assigned. Wouldn't flipped learning in a way address concerns about laborious homework? Students would simply be introduced to the lesson material via videotaped lessons/lectures viewed at home. The real time-consuming struggling with the material -- as students collaborate, create, and synthesize -- would happen in class, with the helpful guidance of the nearby teacher. Wouldn't it be better to have the students doing that latter-stage work with your input, scaffolding, and correction -- instead of leaving it for them to finish at home?

Thanks,

Emelie Rutherford (DCPS, 10th-grade ELA)

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
JAndrews(3) Disputed
1 point

Hi Andrew - You've raised two interesting points against flipped learning. I urge you to look at the Pew Research Center's (2018) recent statistics regarding mobile phone ownership when considering the access question for American students. Although not all students own smartphones, many do and these devices can be used to facilitate flipped learning. Schools should also consider how time in school and school devices can be used more effectively to allow for flipped learning to occur. The flipped model presented by Bergmann and Sams (2014) actually addresses a part of the access question as it encourages teachers to move beyond recording lectures to be listened to at home and encourages them to reconsider their approach to learning and teaching as a whole. This also addresses your second point about minimizing the amount of homework assigned and respecting student's time at home. I agree that we need to be mindful of the amount of homework we assign students but the complete flipped model encompasses much more than assigning videos for homework.

References

Bergmann, J. & Sams, A., (2014). Flipped learning: Gateway to student achievement. Washington, DC. International Society for Technology in Education.

Pew Research Center: Internet & Technology. (2018, February 05). Mobile Fact Sheet. Retrieved July 13, 2018, from http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/mobile/

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
Lrosale2(5) Clarified
1 point

Hello,

You provided great support for a key issue in the implementation of flipped classrooms. I really appreciated that you pointed out that a flipped classroom is more than just a pre-recorded lecture. Overall, good points. Thanks for sharing!

Lisa Rosales

ED.893.645.9A

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
mcarraway(3) Clarified
0 points

Andrew,

I agree with your concerns about technological equity and keeping time after school for kids to be kids. I think that the flipped classroom is best suited for honors and AP classes where students hopefully have a deeper interest in the course material. Flipped classroom can only really be the model for a few classes in a school building because it would be untenable for students to have large volumes of homework for every class. Of course, all of this only works in school districts that support a one-to-one technology plan.

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

While the potential benefits of flipped learning seem exciting, I am cautious for several reasons.

My own background is in creating low cost schools in India. Here, our biggest constraint is often resources. In such a scenario, there are significant difficulties in implementing a flipped classroom and it makes me wonder whether this would be more of a model for resource rich schools.

The big concerns are:

1) Cost – The model requires access to individual devices and broadband at home. This could be challenging in some locations and in certain communities.

2) Teacher sophistication – in the developing world, teacher quality is generally an issue. Thus, strictly controlled lesson plans are used (with admittedly mixed results). Without highly skilled teachers, who have high tech literacy, would flipped learning be possible?

Another concern for me is the relationship between flipped classrooms and Personalised Learning (PL). It appears to me that flipped learning is just a lighter version of PL. For schools that have the financial and human resources, would it not make sense to push the envelope all the way and use tech to implement personalised learning?

ROHAN PARIKH

ED.893.645.91

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
vanderdonckt(2) Clarified
1 point

Sometimes when we write about things like flipping or universal design, we automatically assume that these methods REQUIRE digital content. That is not always the case. Low-tech flipping could involve reading a book or printed text and being ready to engage in discussion or activities around it. It could also be giving students an outline of content or a flowchart to study. Things like storyboards or comics could be used to teach students about processes. If the parents are not readers, this could also help to share the content at home. If teacher sophistication is an issue, these could be created along with the lesson plans.

It is certainly more challenging to flip learning without technology, but it's not impossible and thinking of ways it could be accomplished could lead to some breakthroughs in best practices. I will be thinking about this myself for my classroom.

Cheyanne Vanderdonckt

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Having read all the benefits of the flipped classroom and enjoy reading about its success in many classroom, I still find that this model will not effectively meet the needs of students in rural and urban communities. Though there are many reasons educators are opposed to the flipped classroom model, my stance is solely based on the lack of access many students and teachers still face in rural and urban communities. As mentioned in the Nielsen article, there is still a digital divide in some school communities. Not every student has the access to resources needed to effectively implement a flipped classroom. This digital divide is not just occurring at home, but in schools as well. There are still schools that do not have some of the most basic education technology tools such as a projector or document camera. When discussing what it takes to create a flipped classroom, we must also examine how well equipped a classroom is before this model is adopted.

Next, the discussion around the digital divide must also include a lack of access to information. Do school leaders and teachers working in Title 1 schools even know what a flipped classroom is? Or how it should be implemented? Are there enough professional development workshops on the flipped classroom model teachers have access to? I know I first learned about the flipped classroom model, just a year ago, thanks to a course I took within the SOE. But prior to that, I had no clue what a flipped classroom was, and the articles we read this week go as far back as 2011, showing that this is not a brand-new idea, yet there are still many educators that do not know about the flipped classroom model.

Though I believe it will take a bit more time for the flipped model to be more mainstream, I think it is important that as new ideas and instructional approaches evolve, the core issues in education such as more access and equity in education still need to be addressed.

Nielsen, L. (2011, October 8). Five Reasons I'm Not Flipping Over The Flipped Classroom. Retrieved July 8, 2018, from https://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/ 10/five-reasons-im-not-flipping-over.html

Victoria Cayard

ED.893.645.91.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
Lrosale2(5) Disputed
1 point

Hello Victoria,

Thanks for sharing your perspective. I believe you posed some really good points regarding student access to technology and the effect this access has on participating in a flipped class model. Based on your response it seems you would be open to the idea of a flipped classroom; however, your ability to participate in such a model is hindered by access to technology. This is a crucial issues which must be addressed, especially given the expanding benefits associated with a flipped classroom.

Students in Title I schools are often in greater need of increased differentiation and teacher-student time; therefore, a flipped classroom would arguably be more beneficial to this demographic. This would lead me to question how we could make technology available to this student demographic; whether that be through grants, petitions, etc.

Lisa Rosales

ED.893.645.9A

Side: Flipped Learning Pros
1 point

Although the flipped classroom has its list of student benefits, I do not find it a good fit for all students. The flipped classroom relies heavily on self-motivated or self-reliant students. The at-your-own-pace learning style of learning suggests that students will continue learning the material at their own pace with the technology to guide them. Point blank, some students are not as motivated as others and this method of teaching allows to unmotivated students to fall even further behind. What can we do to motivate the unmotivated? In a non-flipped setting, I find it easier to motivate students. With continual reinforcement, they are motivated. How am I to keep that motivation across the class while students have a device in front of them? Although I understand its benefits of college and career preparedness, I am nervous to flip my classroom due to class size and a majority of low performing students.

Isabel Gaitan ED.893.645.9B.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

The flipped classroom model can be beneficial for some students, however I do not think it is the best fit for all learners in our current education system. It takes a special type of student to be motivated to satisfactorily complete the learning at home. Parental involvement in the learning and overseeing student achievement also should be present. Many students also do not have the means necessary to be able to successfully complete the learning at home. I teach in a Title I school where a majority of my students do not have computers or reliable access to the internet. This would prevent them from the ability to complete the learning at home and be prepared for the in-class activity. A flipped classroom model could create a digital divide between students who have access and students who do not.

Brooke Konefsky

ED.893.645.91

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
1 point

Hi Brooke,

I definitely agree with what your saying. I also work in a Title 1 school where my students do not have access to computers or internet at home. I think what is important about the Flipped Learning is the that it breaks down the traditional teaching model where the teacher holds all the knowledge. I created a hybrid model, where some lessons leaned more towards the traditional model, while the next day would be less lecture based. I found that my students became bored with the traditional learning model and it resulted in less learning and more behavioral issues. I also had the luxury of having 90 minute class periods which allowed me to squeeze in both lecturing and more customized and creative learning activity.

Thanks,

Olivia Rauss

ED.893.645.9B

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
0 points

Although research has shown that the Flipped Classroom Model has positive results in improving student achievement, I believe lack of access prevents this model from being an effective instructional strategy for all students. The majority of students I teach come from low-income and disadvantaged communities. Many of my students’ families do not have the tools and/or home environment that is conducive for flipped learning. Flipped classrooms require each student to have their own digital device (preferably a computer) and Internet access outside of school, in order to participate in the class and view the class lectures and presentations (Nielsen, 2011).

Some may argue, that students have smart phones, but if the cell phone does not have any data, it is “useless”. Many of my students do not have reliable transportation to go the library, have to take care of younger siblings, after-school jobs, or get home late from after-school activities that can prevent or distract students from fully engaging with Flipped learning at home (Nielsen, 2011). I assert implementing strategies, such as flipped learning into a learning environment without taking into consideration the population of students that are being served is ineffective.

Ideally, a more effective approach of implementing Flipped learning would be school-issued computers for every student; however, since this isn’t likely, teachers could possibly create stations in the classroom where students still watch short video lectures and spend the remainder of class, collaboratively working with their peers and/or receiving one-to-one instruction from the teacher.

Reference

Nielsen, L. (2011, October 8). Five Reasons I'm Not Flipping Over The Flipped Classroom. Retrieved July 8, 2018, from https://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/ 10/five-reasons-im-not-flipping-over.html

Stephanie Murray

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
2 points

Hi Stephanie!

Though I am in support of a flipped classroom, you bring up very good points on the importance of access. In order for a flipped classroom to work efficiently, resources especially technology is needed. If students do not have access to the resources at home they are unable to apply the knowledge once they need to complete the corresponding activity.

I like your solution of creating centers. Though I am not sure it will still be considered a flipped classroom, I can see the benefits of teaching a 10-15 mini lesson and disbursing the class into small groups to apply the skills they have just learned. This approach fosters a sense of collaboration and provides differentiated instruction based on student groupings.

Another possible solution is for students to receive instruction on one day and the next day they are working on a project or assignment applying the skills that were taught the previous day. I'm still not sure if this approach meets the criteria of a flipped classroom. What are your thoughts?

Victoria Cayard

ED.893.645.91

Side: Flipped Learning Cons
StephMurray(3) Clarified
1 point

Hi Victoria!

Thank you for your question and feedback. I do believe learning centers are a great alternative to flipped learning, especially when technology access is limited. I like the suggestion you gave in reference to students receiving instruction whether it is face-to-face or online on one day and then completing an assignment or project the next day. I believe this would give students more time to process new content at their own pace and demonstrate their learning.

Stephanie Murray

ED.893.645.9A.SU18

Side: Flipped Learning Pros