CreateDebate


Debate Info

Debate Score:30
Arguments:21
Total Votes:35
More Stats

Argument Ratio

side graph
 
  (18)

Debate Creator

xMathFanx(1573) pic



IQ: Ranges, Meaning, and Achievement

IQ: Ranges, Meaning, and Achievement

This Thread is intended to present material on IQ research that will be explored by all members that wish to participate.  Arguments both for and against (as well as neutral) are all welcome.  If members have further research/findings they would like to present, by all means, please do so--any & all contributions are encouraged.    

[Note:  Due to character limitations, I will present some initial thoughts/posts immediately following the creation of this Thread]
Add New Argument
5 points

@xMathFanx

If your claims are to be taken seriously (which, I realize there may be quite some hyperbole built into your statements)

Yes, there is a great deal of hyperbole in those IQ estimates. Plus that post was a while ago. In order to make accurate estimates we first need to take into account that IQ tests only deal with a limited range of cognitive measurements. When I made those estimates I was not only engaging in hyperbole but I was also making judgements based on the exact type of things that an IQ test isn't designed for. For example, Nomenclature probably has a higher IQ than 80, in fact his IQ is probably above average, but he is ideologically retarded and lacks basic common sense in many regards. If there was an all encompassing type of IQ test many of the people who have high IQs or normal IQs by today's standards would get low scores and vice versa. For example if you gave an IQ test to a cro magnon they probably wouldn't even understand it, yet you could clearly observe that they have a great deal of intelligence when it comes to turning the resources in their environment to their advantage.

I think you will find that the average IQ of the members on this board is much, much higher than you may have realized

We are in agreement that the average create debate member has an higher than average IQ. Which is concerning because even though they are smarter than the average person people like Amarel and Antrim etc. are completely ignorant fools. They are stuck in most of the same delusions an average human would be stuck in, maybe if they where conditioned in a different environment they wouldn't think as idiotically. A Cro Magnon like I mentioned earlier could easily adapt to modern society if they where raised in that environment, some of them might even get doctorates degrees. So there is no reason someone from modern society couldn't be less subjective and uncivilized if they where exposed to a non-retarded environment for long enough. Maybe Amarel for example wouldn't think subjective things are made of some sort of metaphysical substance that exists in the aether if he wasn't raised in a society and culture based on subjective things and social constructs.

1 point

@The0bserver

In order to make accurate estimates we first need to take into account that IQ tests only deal with a limited range of cognitive measurements....If there was an all encompassing type of IQ test many of the people who have high IQs or normal IQs by today's standards would get low scores and vice versa.

Interesting. Now, the first statement we undoubtedly agree on, the second we may also--although I would have to see you detail your argument more to be sure.

Now, I think I have already addressed some areas where IQ has some reasonable success, then, I will focus in on areas that I view as problematic.

(A) IQ tests are right to time tests in certain areas, as computational speed is pertinent to intelligence. However, this is also highly limited that there is not a section that accounts for deep critical thought that occurs over very long time periods, such as the intelligence required to read a book the likes of "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathon Swift and follow what is going on to the depth that the author intended. Or, better yet, to independently create such a story. Consider, this is truly one of the most important types of human intellect, which helps distinguish us from "calculators" (which, although very fast & powerful, are quite constrained in ability to the "rules"). A true intelligence test should be taking this into account, separate to the portions of the test that are timed

(B) Many of the questions themselves are fundamentally flawed. As the member SeanB rightly pointed out, Psychologists are attempting to design an all encompassing intelligence test while failing to realize that they necessarily aren't the most intelligent--thus would fail at the task in ways they (very likely) are unable to foresee (or possibly even understand). Consider, some of the question are typically along the line, "Identify the pattern, determine what comes next". Now, it is quite possible that there is more than one pattern that may occur to a person of high intellect, thus delaying their computational speed score and (possibly) arriving at the "wrong" conclusion--even though the pattern identified is entirely self-consistent.

(C) Background knowledge is necessary in order to take the test, thus those unfamiliar with, for instance, particular terms or membership to a group, will necessarily do poorly on such a question, regardless of their ability to identify the relationship (or not).

(D) There are far superior ways to test for computational speed and power, although it would necessarily require education (which they are attempting to factor out of the equation). Now, an issue with not introducing this factor is that it can truly skew the results. That is, it is patently obvious that a human mind capable of doing some extremely involved triple integral in their head within a certain time constraint (i.e. while timed) is a much better indicator of their brain's computational speed & power then essentially the riddles that are often employed in IQ tests. Now, it is absurd to claim that if person (A) can do the triple integral problem but gets "tripped up" on the IQ riddle problem, while person (B) cannot not even dream of doing the triple integral prb. while flies through the IQ riddle--then, person (B) is therefore more Quantitatively intelligent/advanced (although this is the current system). Note: This is not just a hypothetical, it has famously been reported that Richard Feynman scored an IQ of 125 while a typical Physics Major is (claimed) to be IQ 133. This is an absurdity, and demonstrates a clear issue with the testing, not that Feynman somehow managed to win a Nobel in Physics for his work in QED, contribute to the Manhattan Project, ect. with an intelligence level less than a typical Physics Undergraduate--as many people actually seem to believe simply because of the authority surrounding IQ tests

NumberOne(445) Disputed
-2 points
Daegonius(328) Disputed
2 points

So you feel that not agreeing with your theory that whites are superior to other races makes a person "ideologically retarded"?

I know plenty of niggers that are smarter than your white ass.

your statement implies that ideology has a right and wrong answer, which is itself strong evidence of intellectual ignorance.

Then why are you so impassioned about opposing the ideological principles of conservatism? Shut the fuck up you hypocritical wanktard. Ideology does have a right and wrong answer, and the right answer is that you are all wrong.

upvoting your own bullshit is not something intelligent people have to do in order for others to agree with them.

I did that for a very practical reason, if I didn't upvote myself my post would have been buried under the other posts in the thread.

if what you believed were popular, then the chances are high that it would be stupid,

That's true, why can you only understand things when they are convenient for you? I have said the exact same thing before. The thing is I am not trying to be popular, and if I was popular then it would only make popular things that much less stupid. Also you have contradicted yourself, if intelligent people get agreed with so often then that would make their ideas popular which would mean popular things aren't stupid but they are and intelligent people's ideas aren't as popular as stupid ones.

3 points

Consider, a normal IQ score falls between the range 85-115 which is approximately 70% of the population (and only 15% of people have an IQ of 115 or above), while an extended average IQ range tends to encompass those between 80-119 which is "x"% of the population. In order to qualify for the International High IQ Society, one must have an IQ of 125 or above, while entry into Mensa (a High IQ organization that represents the upper 2% of the population) requires an IQ of 2 standard deviations above average (or 130 and above). For the lower end of the bell curve, this will be explored later on in the post (as well as a more proper breakdown of the rest of the distribution).

Now, what do these numbers mean? That is, in principle, what can one do with a 100 IQ? It turns out, many studies have been done linking average IQ scores to completion of College Majors, SAT scores, and GRE (set aside the problematic elements for a moment, of which we can explore later). As for College Majors, studies have revealed a strong correlation for between those who go far into/complete specific college majors and IQ. The breakdown is as follows:

Top End of Spectrum

-Physics & Astronomy (133)

-Mathematical Sciences (130)

-Philosophy (129)

-Materials Engineering (129)

-Economics (128)

-Chemical Engineering (128)

-Other Engineering (128)

-Mechanical Engineering (126)

Bottom End of Spectrum

-Administration (107)

-Home Economics (106)

-Special (106)

-Student Counseling (105)

-Early Childhood (104)

-Social Work (103)

In order to attend College and be successful, it was found that an IQ of 110-115 is standardly required. Now, if a person with a 110-115 IQ attempted to be a Physics & Astronomy major, it has been found that they would quickly run into trouble and likely have to drop out (or fail out) early on. However, they would be successful at other college majors, some of which were listed previously. Then, an individual with a 100 base IQ has been shown to not (currently) be able to attend college successfully.

To put this in practical terms, lets take the example of those with an IQ 2 standard deviations from the norm in the adult population (2% of the population), or Physics & Astronomy combined with Mathematical Sciences Majors (closely followed by Philosophy and certain Engineering Majors, but we will limit our discussion to those past the threshold). This indicates that if we took a random sampling of 100 adults, approximately 2 would have a mind currently capable of the "brain power" necessary to do Complex Analysis or Statistical Mechanics (which is in-line with Senior level Physics or Math major cognitive abilities). As for what a 115 IQ would look like in practical terms, such a person would (currently) struggle tremendously to get a Political Science degree if they were able to attain it at all (IQ 120), while they would be able to get a degree in Business (114), Education (110), ect. See list here for more details: https://thetab.com/us/2017/04/10/which-major-has-highest-iq-64811

Now, IQ links to Standardized Tests such as the SAT and GRE are quite interesting as well--let us proceed with investigating the case of SAT scores. We will use the 1600 score standard (Note: a link to conversions between 2400 to 1600 score standards will be provided under Sources if one were curious). Consider, a score of 925 on the SAT (is claimed) to translate to a base 100 IQ. Here is an outline mapping out key points on the Bell Curve:

IQ, SAT, Meaning

- 55, 400, Trainable Moderate Mental Retardation

- 66, 525, Mild Mental Retardation

- 75, 630, Borderline Mental Retardation

- 87, 775, Dull

- 100, 935, Average

- 113, 1100, Bright

- 120, 1200, Very Bright

- 130, 1310, Extremely Bright

- 141, 1445, Briliant

- 151, 1575, Very Brilliant

For convenience, a few figures converted to the 2400 point scale (conversion chart here- https://blog.prepscholar.com/new-sat-conversion-chart-old-2400-to-new-1600 ):

IQ, SAT

- 75, 820

- 87, 1020

- 100, 1260

- 113, 1510

- 120, 1670

- 130, 1840

- 141, 2070

- 151, 2340

[Note: There are various IQ scales, some reach to numbers higher well higher to this, this is a Standard Scales, others could be used with similar (though varying in extent) results]

Follow this link to find an IQ Reference Table which outlines IQ ranges and typical corresponding abilities: https://www.easycalculation.com/medical/iq-score-table.php

Below is a transcription of the outline (IQ range, Category, Typical Ability):

1. 0-24

Profound Mental Retardation

Limited or no ability to communicate, eat, bath, dress and toilet.

2. 25-39

Severe Mental Retardation

Limited ability to communicate, eat, bath, dress and toilet. No academic skills.

3. 40-54

Moderate Mental Retardation

Some independent self-help skills and very basic academic skills.

4. 55-69

Mild Mental Retardation

Usually able to dress/bath independently and can do simple jobs. Elementary school academics.

5. 70-79

Border Line

May live independently with difficulties. Can perform simple and repetitive jobs.

6. 80-89

Low Average

Can complete vocational education and live independently.

7. 90-109

Average

Can complete high school graduation and college with difficulty.

8. 110-119

High Average

Typical level of college graduates.

9. 120-129

Superior

Typical level of persons with doctoral degrees.

10. 130-144

Gifted

Capable of understanding highly, complex academic material.

11. 145-159

Genius

Exception intellectual ability and capable of looking beyond known facts.

12. 160-175

Extraordinary genius

Extraordinary talent like Albert Einstein

Sources

1. www.iqcomparisonsite.com/oldSATIQ.aspx

2. https://www.statisticbrain.com/iq-estimates-by-intended-college-major/

3. www.i3mindware.com/what-is-an-iq-test-and-iq-score

4. https://www.123test.com/interpretation-of-an-iq-score/

5. https://pumpkinperson.com/2015/12/16/revised-chart-converting-sat-scores-to-iq-equivalents/

6. https://steemit.com/education/@chhaylin/are-too-many-people-going-to-college-a-look-at-iq-distributions-tells-us-why-this-is-the-case

7. https://thetab.com/us/2017/04/10/which-major-has-highest-iq-64811

8. https://blog.prepscholar.com/new-sat-conversion-chart-old-2400-to-new-1600

9. https://www.easycalculation.com/medical/iq-score-table.php

10. https://www.easycalculation.com/medical/ iq-score-table.php

11. www.highiqpro.com/iq-academic-success/academic-achievement-income-iq

12. www.randalolson.com/2014/06/25/average-iq-of-students-by-college-major-and-gender-ratio/

2 points

A few questions:

1. You list average (mean or median) IQ for certain college majors. You then state that:

"As for what a 115 IQ would look like in practical terms, such a person would (currently) struggle tremendously to get a Political Science degree if they were able to attain it at all (IQ 120)"

Is that really true? I would expect them to struggle, but if the average IQ for political science is 120, 115 is just 4.2% less than that, I wouldn't think it'd be crazy hard for them to pass. I would expect there to be plenty of variation in IQ between successful political science majors.

2. It is interesting to see these statistics, but I'm still not sure what IQ actually represents, just what it is correlated to. I don't think it can be the be all end all of how "smart" someone is. I think there are and have been plenty of people with higher IQ than Einstein who could never have discovered what he did. What I'm trying to say is that there seems to be something missing from IQ measurement. Maybe it is some sort of creativity or originality, I don't know. I haven't really researched it beyond the surface, though I've always been curious.

3. There could have been a confusion of causation and correlation with IQ and majors. By that I mean, it could (at least to some degree) just be that people with higher IQ are more likely to choose philosophy than home economics, not that a higher IQ is necessarily required (although in that example I'm sure it would be). It's probably a bit of both. Maybe this is accounted for in the sources though, I didn't have the patience to check them.

xMathFanx(1573) Clarified
1 point

@Mack

Thanks for your input

1... Is that really true? I would expect them to struggle, but if the average IQ for political science is 120, 115 is just 4.2% less than that, I wouldn't think it'd be crazy hard for them to pass. I would expect there to be plenty of variation in IQ between successful political science majors.

Now, 120 for Poly. Sci. describes the standard student across all University hierarchies (e.g. from local to Harvard). Then, that figure, generally speaking would fall on school that just make the rankings or 150ish roughly. First, I mistypes and intended to say 113 as a "standard deviation" is 15, so 7 is roughly half a standard deviation (which is quite noticeable). A person with a 113 IQ is much better suited for Business major at a decent school. Such a person in a Poly. Sci. major would like struggle but keep up for the first half of College, and then struggle to keep up for Upper-Division courses. Generally, the average class distribution for Poly. Sci. (or any such major) will be within a few points + or - from the center for roughly 75% of the class, within the remaining outliers being those that tend to get the highest and lowest marks. Most colleges have the students compete against eachother, and "curve" the course grade based on a bell-curve distribution. Hence, having an IQ 1/2 standard deviation below the average in the class will prove to be quite difficult to overcome.

Lets take another example (as I think this may prove illustrative), the average Engineering IQ is 125-128 (lets call it 126) while the average History Major IQ is 119. Now, does it seem difficult to imagine that a standard History Major will have a very rough time transitioning/switching into an Engineering major? Note: That is what 1/2 standard deviation looks like

2. It is interesting to see these statistics, but I'm still not sure what IQ actually represents, just what it is correlated to. I don't think it can be the be all end all of how "smart" someone is. I think there are and have been plenty of people with higher IQ than Einstein who could never have discovered what he did. What I'm trying to say is that there seems to be something missing from IQ measurement. Maybe it is some sort of creativity or originality, I don't know. I haven't really researched it beyond the surface, though I've always been curious.

IQ measurements are by no means a Physics equation--not even close. Now, they are a laudable beginning attempt to quantify a very difficult notion to "get one's hands around". It has displayed some reasonable success in certain areas at 'ball-parking' a figure for certain abilities (e.g. Quantitative Reasoning, ect.), though it also fails tremendously in other areas. IQ is currently the best model we have, and until a superior model supersedes it, following through with research studies is really the only reasonable/logical course of action as the alternative is to give up and twiddle our thumbs.

The real problem comes in with:

(A) Psychologists & others who claim IQ is somehow analogous to a Physics equation--its not

(B) Pontification regarding genetics vs. environment ratio--too much is unknown. However, not even the extremes indicate 100% or anything even approaching such a number on either end. Thus, we already know that there is far, far more to the story than "Stupid by Nature" v. "Smart by Nature" narrative

Now, what IQ really fails at measuring is deep critical thinking that happens over very extended time-frames, and is much better at measuring computational speed, power, ect. (as well many other abilities, of course). That is, IQ fails miserably when attempting to determine if a person is able to read a book such as "Gulliver's Travels" from Jonathon Swift, and see if the reader/test taker follows what is going on at the level was intended by the author (or above).

Here is a post of mine from another forum that may prove useful here:

There is a tremendous amount of data that the IQ of the general population has went up significantly in the past decades, this is why they need to keep re-calibrating the 100 base. Also, consider, Archimedes was an unprecedented genius approximately 2200-2300 years ago, and he only knew Geometry (basic Geometry). That is what High School kids learn now. If an average Mathematics B.S. time travelled back to converse with the ancient genius, Archimedes would be mind-boggled by the skills, abilities, knowledge, ect. of such a person--he would likely be tempted to call him a "genius", even though in our time period we understand how absurd that is. Likewise, the Mathematics that is perceived to be "advanced" in our modern time, will in several hundred to thousand-ish years time be the basic Math of such a future society, the skills of which would be acquired by "average" people. Genetically, we will not have changed at all then, just as we haven't now compared to Archimedes time.

Now, you are right that depending on how low their IQ started out, it would indeed stifle any ability to learn such advanced material. For instance, if one's IQ start in the 70s, well there really isn't much we can do for them, unfortunately. As for IQ 100 (or less) people being able to do Complex Analysis, that is inconceivable. However, if one starts with a 100 IQ, this is consistent with graduating High School and learning basic Algebra. From there, they could train and learn Pre-Calc which would require an IQ notably/but reasonably higher. Then, Calc 1-->2-->3-->ODE., Basic Analysis-->PDE, Real Analysis-->Complex Analysis (IQ 130-133ish). Now, this may take quite some time and a lot of effort, certainly a hell of a lot more effort than a person starting at an IQ 125 or obviously 140+, though we know this is achievable due to Neuroplasticity. Now, that doesn't mean you can keep going indefinitely either--it certainly won't make them Newton-level, just more intelligent than they previously were, enough so to become an Engineer, for instance (unless, of course, they are starting from far too low a number as discussed before)

3. There could have been a confusion of causation and correlation with IQ and majors. By that I mean, it could (at least to some degree) just be that people with higher IQ are more likely to choose philosophy than home economics, not that a higher IQ is necessarily required (although in that example I'm sure it would be). It's probably a bit of both. Maybe this is accounted for in the sources though, I didn't have the patience to check them.

It is a good point, I wondered that myself in terms of Philosophy. It seems to me likely that people of High IQ tend to be attracted to Philosophy, since it is addressing the big/deep questions related to existence. Now as for the rest, the general argument regarding IQ and achievement goes like this:

1. Those with Higher IQ's tend to do better on the SATs

2. Those who tend to do better on the SAT's tend to get into bigger/more elite schools where they choose and succeed at more challenging College Majors (such as the ones listed in my OP--e.g. STEM, ect.)

3. Those more challenging College Majors (e.g. Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, ect.) tend to pay much more than less challenging majors

4. Therefore, those with Higher IQ's tend to be more successful Academically and Monetarily in life compared to those with lower IQ's

2 points

Excellent post and very thought provoking.

I noticed that rheology or Comparative Religion majors were so low in IQ that they weren't even listed. LOL. Off the charts on the bottom, eh?

This comes as no surprise to me.

Cheers, mate.

PS... My major and my degree would fall under the Other Engineering category, I reckon. Since I got my Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering. I then got a second degree in Communications, which is what I do now as I travel for 200 days of the year installing and repairing satellite dishes and microwave towers.

Cheers.

1 point

@Arsenal

Thanks for your input and sharing your background

Since I got my Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering. I then got a second degree in Communications, which is what I do now as I travel for 200 days of the year installing and repairing satellite dishes and microwave towers.

Out of curiosity, did you get a 2nd Bachelor's degree for Communications, or did you get an M.A./M.S.? I ask because the correlation of IQ and Educational level achieved tends to go up with advanced degrees (i.e. G.E.D./High School --> A.A. --> B.A. --> M.A. --> PhD).

Either way, if one is to accept these general outlines found as a result of Psychology research, that would seem to put you in the higher end of the "Superior" category quite possibly/likely qualifying for the International High IQ Society

1 point

IQ isn't a good indicator of achievement, for several reasons.

1. High achievement generally requires the ability to form social relationships and network. People with very high IQ's tend to struggle with this. They're quite literally not on every one else's wavelength.

2. IQ is a measurement of specific types of cognitive abilities which are arbitrarily chosen by those who design IQ tests. Yet, IQ test makers are certainly not the most intelligent people on the planet. Who gives them the authority to determine the intelligence of others? It is akin to an 18th Century German history expert declaring himself the arbitrator for intelligence and then designing tests scoring peoples' intelligence on the basis of their knowledge of 18th Century German history.

Silly when you think about it.

3. There are different kinds of intelligence that can't be qualified or quantified with an IQ test. Nonverbal communication is a type of intelligence that is almost universally a predeterminer for success. It can't be measured through IQ.

So really, IQ tests ought to be considered a rough guide to a person's level of standardised Western arithmetic and possibly as a fair indicator of their potential for success in academia. It's not much use for anything else.

I was Mensa material as a kid. Still not a millionaire.

xMathFanx(1573) Clarified
1 point

@seanB

Your input on this topic is appreciated

IQ isn't a good indicator of achievement, for several reasons.

See my response to The0bserver for some of my criticisms of IQ

1 point

The issues with IQ as a measure of intelligence are rather numerous, for example, one can score vastly differently on different tests as different tests are measuring different parts of one's intelligence. Verbal, spacial and emotional intelligence; abstract problem solving; working memory; attention; processing speed; fluid and crystal intelligence etc., there are a multitude of different domains of intelligence. Your score, then, depends in part on what part of intelligence the test is measuring.

This is not to say that IQ testing is without merit, Mathfan's list of college majors by IQ demonstrates this quite aptly. It does mean, however, that every IQ test will assess you based on different criteria (and even when they are the same the weighting will differ). This can result in individuals achieving wildly different IQ scores on different tests. Interestingly, the higher one's IQ overall, the greater the difference between their aptitudes across domains of intelligence; e.g. verbal, spatial, social etc. This is probably part of why the socially retarded, super intelligent nerd is such a common stereotype.

xMathFanx(1573) Clarified
1 point

@WinstonC

Thanks for your input on this topic

The issues with IQ as a measure of intelligence are rather numerous, for example, one can score vastly differently on different tests as different tests are measuring different parts of one's intelligence.

Yes, there are different IQ test standards devised by Psychologists, some of which may be more focused on a particular area than others. Though, if one takes a standard 'intelligence' test, knows their SAT or GRE score (from now or previously), College major/success at College/academically (or more advanced degree), ect., then they will get a decent picture of what their current IQ score is about

1 point

Who has the highest IQ on CD?

https://www.arealme.com/iq/en/

Take the test and post your results

The two best IQ tests on the internet are provided below (Note: most internet IQ tests fail to give a reasonable ballpark of the takers abilities, as they operate on internally 'rigged' algorithms to produce a non-relevant result)

(1) https://www.123test.com/culture-fair-intelligence-test/ (Note: there is a free 'very' condensed IQ test that will provide a rough ball-park of what range you should expect to fall into if you take the full length test)

(2) https://www.us.mensa.org/join/mht/

[Note, both tests require a fee ($9 and $18)]

The test from (1) is the only online test that has been refereed & deemed applicable for entrance to The International High IQ Society if one achieves a score 124 or above (or, higher than 95% of the population). Other ways into the society include Mensa intelligence test, Mensa membership, IQ test in person administered by professional(s), SAT score that is above the necessary mark.

Test from (2) is provided by Mensa as a Practice test. Mensa requires that one submit SATs, take a Mensa full length test in person, or an IQ test administered by a Psychologist all with translated scores 2 standard deviations above the norm (or, 130 for 15 sd & 132 for 16 sd). The Practice test is designed to give one a solid picture of the type of score they could expect to earn if they followed through and took the full-length Mensa intelligence test at one of their locations and dates (such tests are administered throughout the country relatively frequently, testing fee is about $60--compare that to a Psychologist administered intelligence test, which will cost easily upwards of $500)

Thus, if one does well on the Mensa practice test (i.e. 132 or above), it would be worth taking a full-length test offered by Mensa at a testing center at some point (if desired/curious), as there is a very strong likelihood of testing in & earning admittance to the organization

Note: Mensa and The International High IQ Society are the largest high IQ societies in the world

See High IQ societies:

(A) www.free-iqtest.net/high-iq-societies.asp

(B) https://www.iq-test.net/top-9-international-high-iq-societies-35.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In addition to my previous post, one of the best ways to test your IQ on the internet (or even generally) is to take the SAT (if one has no to very limited College experience (i.e. 1 year or less) or the GRE (if one has graduated College or is just about to graduate). Now, for those in the middle of College or toward the end of College debating which test to take, either would work (i.e. SAT or GRE) or perhaps blend your two scores together if the SAT turns out significantly higher than the GRE.

Legitimate free tests can be found online, as well as SAT, GRE to IQ conversion tables. This will give one a pretty good sense of what their IQ is. Also, administered practice tests can be found at centers for a fee.

Note: These are typically about 4 hour long tests

If anyone is interested in where to find the requisite sources to carry out the examination as well as conversion to IQ, links can be provided