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52
5
It is possible. Fat chance, buddy.
Debate Score:57
Arguments:16
Total Votes:66
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 It is possible. (13)
 
 Fat chance, buddy. (3)

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Kragnerac(29) pic



Is extra-terrestrial life possible?

It came from space...

It is possible.

Side Score: 52
VS.

Fat chance, buddy.

Side Score: 5
6 points

The Milky Way Galaxy alone has a projected 100 billion stars, and with each of those stars having the possibility of having celestial objects with suitable conditions for harboring life, I'd say it's a good chance.

Side: It is possible.
9 points

You're too modest; the Milky Way alone has a projected 200 to 400 billion stars. And there are estimated to be 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe. Now, for simplicity's sake we'll say all galaxies have the same number of stars as the Milky Way; that's anywhere from 2 X 10^22 to 4 X 10^22 stars in the known universe. All of those stars have the probability of having orbiting planets, with perhaps one or two providing conditions to sustain life.

Multi-cellular life requires more precise conditions to survive than, say, extremophiles. Thus to have carbon-based life as we know it would require conditions similar to earth's. This would be much rarer than planets with barely enough hospitable conditions for extremophiles, however when you take into account the vastness of the universe and the quadrillions and quadrillions of stars and planets out there, there are very likely planets that either harbor carbon-based life or will in the future gain the environmental conditions to provide for carbon-based life, if they are on the fringe of, say, harboring liquid water (though many other criteria must be met to replicate the conditions found on earth).

Intelligent life, as we know it, is probably extremely rare in the universe, but it is also quite possible, given the multitude of planets and probability for suitable conditions. So, in response to the topic, yes. Extra-terrestrial life is possible.

Side: It is possible.
2 points

Agreed. The probability of out planet being able to support life is so amazingly small, that there must be another somewhere out there that falls within the same window of probability. Whether or not we will ever meet another intelligent life form is pretty slim, but finding some kind of life that did not originate on this planet, no matter what level, I think, is pretty good.

Side: It is possible.
4 points

I agree. It's just a case of extrapolating our discoveries e.g. the sun doesn't orbit us, god is a myth, we're in a remote part of the galaxy, probability is a science, the universe is really, really big and packed full of all the same stuff.

Side: It is possible.
4 points

life out side the earth belief started since ancient egypt,babylon,assyria,sumer etc.as on what we had learn from our studies,universe is unmeasurable,could have earth like planets on other galaxies.

as our existence are still a mistery,extraterrestrial beings might be also asking if same planet of them also exist,they might be far advance on technologies,and capable of hopping planet to planet.they might be watching us.lol

Side: It is possible.
3 points

I would go so far as to bet on this possibility. I think it's very improbable to say there Isn't.

Side: It is possible.
3 points

I think it is not only possilble, but highly probable. Out of all of the millions of stars out there there has to be more than one planet that can sustain life. It may not be as complex as ours, but I'm pretty sure it's there.

Side: It is possible.
3 points

It is absolutely possible.

Now as for probable its simlar a matter of hos unlikely a planet is to have the requirements for life vs how many planets there are.

(slight over-simplication)

I don't know estimates for the numbers but just considering how vast our universe is I think its likely that life either currently exists elsewhere or was/will exist at some time.

Unfortunately given how large the universe is it is unlikely we would actually come in to contact with them. I can dream though.

Side: It is possible.
3 points

It's pretty naive to say that Earth is the only life-supporting planet. The universe is big, and there are a lot of planets. The chances of two planets having the same type of atmosphere, land, and distance from their star as Earth is pretty large.

Once science finds more information why life begins and what causes it, we will be able to narrow down the planets even farther than we have so far. Maybe then we will find something, and nobody knows what will be out there. It could be pretty cool...

Side: It is possible.
1 point

Yes, it is very possible that we are not alone in the universe. Out of those billions of stars, it is almost impossible to believe that we are the only forms of life out of all of them. However, the chance of finding highly advanced organisms is very slim. and it gets slimmer as your expectations get higher. I would guess that their are about 500,000 planets with no life or cell-level lifeforms for ever 1 planet that has intelligent life.

Side: It is possible.

I think that we can get some of our extremophobes to live some place else.

Side: It is possible.
1 point

possible, NOT LIKELY.

Side: Fat chance, buddy.
RevFred(349) Disputed
3 points

If that's what you truly believe, then you voted the wrong way.

Side: It is possible.
NamelessJoe(16) Disputed
3 points

What leads you to say it's not likely?

The milky way alone has somewhere between 200 and 400 billion stars. It's likely that many of these stars have planets, but it's what the ratio of planets to stars is; to be on the safe side, lets say there's one planet for every hundred stars. That gives us about 3 billion planets.

Life on earth evolved to very specific conditions. Early life forms on earth likely evolved in water, with certain atoms--carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen--present, and with access to mild sunlight, 1 atm of pressure, and countless other conditions. It's likely that life could form in different conditions, and perhaps very different conditions, but to be on the conservative side, let's assume that it can't. Lets say only one in, say, a hundred million planets are earth-like. That gives us 30 hospitable planets in our galaxy.

The likelihood of life forming on a livable planet is a total crap-shoot. It could be all but inevitable, or it could be a one-in-a-trillion. Again, lets be conservative and say that it's incredibly unlikely. That gives us a 0.00000000003 chance of life forming in any one galaxy.

The thing is, though, there are an almost infinite number of galaxies. Saying that there are more galaxies then there are grains of sand in all the world's beaches is a gross understatement. Saying that there are more galaxies than there are atoms in the earth is a bit closer, but not much.

If there's a virtually infinite number of galaxies, the odds of there being life on other planets--even if the odds are terrible for any one planet, or any one galaxy--are incredibly high, to to point where the evolution of life on many, many other planets is all but a statistical certainty. The only exception would be if there was something special about Earth that no (or almost no) other planets shared, but there's no reason to assume this is the case. The more we learn about astronomy, the more we learn how un-special our planet and solar system are. If life arose naturally, extra-terrestrial life isn't just possible, it's all but certain.

Supporting Evidence: Drake Equation for Extraterrestrial Life (en.wikipedia.org)
Side: It is possible.

If aliens did exist, they would have introduced themselves to us by now.

Side: Fat chance, buddy.

Never! Are you serious?? Who is the person who creates such ridiculous debate??

Side: Fat chance, buddy.