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Debate Info

33
24
Yes No
Debate Score:57
Arguments:40
Total Votes:57
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 Yes (20)
 
 No (20)

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Is sympathy earned by the Monster?

Taking into account the theme of nurture vs. nature, do you think that the monster deserves sympathy from humanity? You must use text evidence from chapters 17-24.5 to support your argument. You must post two debate responses. If possible, vote for what you think are the most effective arguments.

 

Yes

Side Score: 33
VS.

No

Side Score: 24
5 points

I believe that the monster deserves sympathy from society. He is the monstrous creation of a confused man, and he receives no instruction or assistance at integrating himself into normal society. As the reader we know that the monster is capable of intelligent thoughts and rational reasoning. He explains to his creator that he is "content to reason with [him]" (104). In fact, his reasoning is so convincing that Victor initially agrees to create a female similar to him, but then he betrays the monster and goes back on his promise. The monster has been taught to not trust others and to use force to get his way, hence the murders. The monster is a rational being who has been trained by his creator to use force to evoke a response rather than intelligent reasoning which failed him.

| Side: Yes
3 points

I believe that humanity sympathizes with the monster. He is very depressed because of the way that people treat him. The monster is a misunderstood and gentle soul. He has human-like emotions and feelings, but people treat him like a hideous beast because of his appearance. He craves affection, but no one will give it to him, not even his creator. The monster claims that even the Devil, “the enemy of God” had friends and companions, but he is alone. In Chapter 24, the monster says, “Once I falsely hoped to meet with beings who, pardoning my outward form, would love me for the excellent qualities which I was capable of unfolding” (165). The monster is not just a wild demon but a creature deprived of affection and friendship. Humanity is able to sympathize with the monster’s miserable situation. “But, in detail which he gave you of them, he could not sum up the hours and months of misery which I endured, wasting in impotent passion” (165). The monster has suffered through feelings of depression and unhappiness, which makes people feel terribly for him. This is a case of the monster being very gentle in nature, but because he has been neglected and has not been nurtured, he has become a violent, misunderstood creature.

| Side: Yes
3 points

I think that the monster does deserve sympathy in some respects. It is not his fault that he was created and he should never have been abandoned by his creator. People should have given him a chance instead of assuming that he was evil. He has been searching for love and acceptance since his creation; however, everyone is mean to him. "I am miserable. Am I not shunned and hated by all mankind? You, my creator, would tear me to pieces, and triumph; remember that, and tell me why I should pity man more than he pities me?" cries the monster to Frankenstein. Every being needs food, water, shelter, and love. The monster is able to provide the first three of these needs on his own. All he asks for is love but no one is willing to give it to him. By nature, the monster is very loving and caring. However, as a result of how he has been treated since his coming to life, he has become angry and depressed. These negative feelings cause him to be mean in some cases. "I am malicious because I am miserable," he explains. Therefore, the monster deserves a lot of sympathy from humanity because it was humanity that shaped him to be the beast that he becomes. If someone had just shown him affection and acceptance, he would never have become malicious.

| Side: Yes
2 points

The "monster" of Frankenstein does deserve some amount of sympathy. The "monster" states that he wants a female companion because he feels that "[he is] malicious because [he is] miserable (pg. 104)." He even realizes that Frankenstein, his creator, "would tear [him] to pieces, and triumph (pg. 104)". The "monster" deserves sympathy because he is despised by his own creator. All the monster wants is a "creature of another sex, but as hideous as [himself] (pg. 105)". He doesn't ask for much, just one who can love him the way he deserves. The "monster" only wants another creature so he can feel what humans do: love. He is terrifying to all who see him because of his looks. They do not give him a chance, therefore he feels he needs a companion who can help him cope with the frustration he feels. His own creator abandoned him, which makes him very deserving of sympathy. He is very compassionate, yet he feels much anger towards the humans who do not accept him simply due to his frightening looks. He is willing to go away forever with his companion so as not to deal with any humans who will judge him. If Frankenstein had not abandoned the "monster," it is likely he would not be so frightening to people, though it would keep people from being sympathetic towards him.

| Side: Yes
2 points

Yes, i believe the monster has earned sympathy. He was not asked to be created. He should have the same rights as any other humans having been created in their image. he has been afforded no affection and as such he says "I am malicious because I am miserable."(pg.104). The monster has done wrong but he has also made attempts to amend them. He offers to go away from the rest of the world if he can be given one person who "felt emotions of benevolence towards" him, he would "make peace with the whole kind" (pg. 105). He desperately wants to have someone to love, just like any other person. He has from birth been lonely and never known the love of another, even his creator Frankenstein. Frankenstein deserved to be put in his own inescapable misery by the monster when he took away the monster's hopes after months of patience, "Do you dare to break your promise?I have endured toil and misery: I left Switzerland with you; I crept along the shores of Rhine, among its willow islands, and over the summits of its hills. I have dwelt many months in the heaths of England, and among the deserts of Scotland. I have endured incalculable fatigue, and cold, and hunger; do you dare to destroy my hopes?"(pg.122). The monster has held up his end of the bargain, yet Frankenstein resents the monster and the harm he could do with a companion, instead of helping his "child" to have the happiness any father should give.

| Side: Yes
2 points

The monster has earned some sympathy because he did not wish to come into this world and is miserable while living in it. "Cursed, cursed creator! Why did I live? Why in that instant, did I not extinguish the spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed? I know not; despair had not yet taken possession of me" (pg.97). He says how miserable he is living his life that should not even be his. He thinks his life should have been taken from him before he had done anything bad.

| Side: Yes
1 point

"I am malicious because I am miserable." (pg.104)

This quote supports the monster being miserable in his life.

| Side: Yes
2 points

I believe that the monster earns sympathy from the reader because it yearns for love and affection, just as humanity does. For instance, Shelly emphasizes this idea with Safie and Felix. Felix is unhappy until he is reunited with his lover. The monster does not understand why society reject him. He longed for a mate, however Victor failed him and he continued to make Victor's life hell until he died. The reader can especially sympathize with the monster when he says that "even that enemy of God and man had friends and associates in his desolation," however the monster is "alone" (165). The monster gains sympathy when he says this because the devil is a creature so wicked and mischievous, with only bad intentions, yet he has companions. However, the monster is good and yet he remains alone.

| Side: Yes
2 points

Yes, the monster has earned sympathy, because he tries to do good but is rewarded with hatred. Multiple times in the book he tries to help someone. However, every time he is hunted or shunned by the people. A specific example of this is when he tried to help a girl who was "drowning". When doing this, a man thought he was going to harm the girl so he shot the monster. Every time something bad happens so he gets sympathy because it is the people in the story who are the real monsters. "She fell into the rapid stream...[he] saved her...every means in my power to restore animation...on seeing me, he [the man] darted towards me...he aimed a gun... and fired." "This was then the reward of my benevolence!" (pg.101). The monster was punished were he did not deserve it.

| Side: Yes
1 point

"A moment ago you were moved by my representations, and why do you again harden yourself to my complaints." (pg.106)

Frankenstein is punishing the monster because of his past when he had done nothing wrong. The monsters intentions are good here.

| Side: Yes
1 point

I think that the monster deserves some sympathy. As evidenced from our last debate, he has definitely earned ours. When the monster says: "I am malicious because I am miserable. Am I not shunned and hated by all mankind?" the Reader cannot help but feel sorry for him. How many of us would be able to stand it if, seeking only affection and love, we were "shunned and hated" by all we approached? The monster says "If any being felt emotions of benevolence towards me, I should return them an hundred and an hundred fold; for that one creature's sake, I would make peace with the whole kind!" He only wants something -- anything -- to accept his hideousness and love him. We can see that his true nature is gentle and kind. He gets his hope built up when Frankenstein promises to make him a mate, but then when he destroys the half-formed woman, I think it truly drives the monster completely insane. Can a reasoning being endure that much stress and hardship? Many have gone crazy from much less.

"Shall each man," cried he, "find a wife for his bosom, and each beast have his mate, and I be alone? I had feelings of affection, and they were requited by detestation and scorn." This is a case where nurture has changed someone into something else. Does Frankenstein really deserve to be happy while the monster "grovel[s] in the intensity of [his] wretchedness?" I think that's what makes him such a great monster; he's relatable -- we can understand why he does what he does.

| Side: Yes
1 point

The monster does deserve sympathy from humanity. It’s evident that the monster was created for no apparent reason and with little thought to it. Nature plays a role as the monster observes the relationships among the people. He wants to feel accepted and have someone to relate to. The monster puts in a request to have Victor build a companion, “Our lives will not be happy, but they will be harmless and free from the misery I now feel. Oh! My creator, make me happy; let me feel gratitude towards you for one benefit! Let me see that I excite the sympathy of some existing thing; do not deny me my request!” (page 105). In a way the monster attempts to develop a father-son relationship as he makes him feel guilty and to nurture him into happiness as parents typically want best for their children. It’s ironic that Clerval was writing to Victor about being alone, “’I had rather be with you,’ he said,’in your solitary rambles, than with these Scotch people, whom I do not know: hasten, then, my dear friend, to return, that I may again feel myself somewhat at home, which I cannot do in your absence’” (page 119). Victor eventually ruins his project to build a woman monster and goes to see Clerval, to his dismay however Clerval is dead. Initiative and lack of understanding the monster’s power attacks Victor and could have easily been avoided if Victor sympathized the monster.

| Side: Yes
1 point

Yes, I believe The Monster did deserve sympathy, especially from his own creator in Victor. The Monster was a creation by Victor and was completely abandoned after creation. Victor made no attempt to even console or help The Monster besides enraging him further by killing his work in progress (companion for The Monster). The Monster was an outcast from the get go because of his hideous appearance, although he made attempts to conform to human society. Victor's convoluted plan to ostracize his entire family and people he cares about to become a great chemist was flawed from the beginning. The Monster had no guidance or companions to call friend in a world where he was created by a human. The Monster's actions were a representation of Victor's consciousness that longed for human companionship. That is exactly why Victor was extremely grieved when he found out about the deaths of his family members, because he understood that it was not The Monster who was at fault but it was ultimately him. Page 97 expresses The Monster's extreme grief: "Cursed, cursed creator! Why did I love? Why, in that instant, did I not extinguish the spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed?"

| Side: Yes
1 point

The monster does deserve some sympathy from humanity for when he is exclaiming "this was then the reward of my benevolence! I had saved a human being from destruction, and as a recompense I now writhed under the miserable pain of a wound which shattered the flesh and bone" (page 101), he is bewildered on how he can not receive accolade for a good deed when he meant well. The monster just gets judged on his appearances and everyone assumes that he is up to no good and he will do wrong.

| Side: Yes
1 point

The monster deserves humanity's sympathy because he is utterly alone in the world which is a condition almost universally disliked. Everyone strives to find some commonality between themselves and others or to find some unifying force, but the monster lacks the ability to do either of these things. There is no one else like him, and when he begs Victor to "create a female for [him], with whom [he] can live in the interchange of those sympathies," his request is ultimately denied (pg 104). Not only is the monster different than everyone else but he is painfully aware of his incurable loneliness and considers himself "cut off from all the world" (pg 105). The monster's inherent loneliness is not his fault, so he deserves people's sympathies.

| Side: Yes
1 point

Truly, the monster was born as a gentle being, yet the reasons in which he was created were sinful. Frankenstein created the being out of selfishness and pride. Although, the creator’s wish of creating life was granted, the creation did not live up to the expectations. Frankenstein was unhappy with his child and decided to leave him out to fend for himself. Without a fatherly figure to guide the being into one who knows from moral and immoral and good and evil, the monster was doomed to fail. I believe that all that happened to Frankenstein was in turn his own fault. Frankenstein was faced with thousands of opportunities to admit the truth, to tell his family that he had given life to a monster. Even so, Frankenstein lied to his loved ones and they died. When the monster realized that he was alone, he asked Frankenstein to cure his sorrows. Frankenstein was demanded to “create a female for [the monster]”(104). This was to only request the monster formally made to his master, and when he was denied happiness the only thing that made sense for him to do was retaliate. At the end of the novel, Frankenstein died and left his creation alone. The monster was denied happiness again, for he took joy in seeing his master chase him. When Walton confronted the monster, telling him his is a wretched demon, the monster responded: “Am I thought to be the only criminal, when all human kind sinned against me? . . . I, the miserable and abandoned, am an abortion, to be spurned at, and kicked, and trampled on. . . You hate me; but your abhorrence cannot equal that with which I regard myself”(165). The monster just wanted what every human being craves, love. The monster wanted to feel the warmth of someone smiling at him and the comfort of knowing you have a shoulder to lean on. It was in his nature to want this, but he was nurtured to be a monster. I think that the monster deserves humanity’s sympathy, for it was our lack of sympathy that transformed him into a monster.

| Side: Yes
1 point

I believe that up until the murder of Elizabeth, the monster earns sympathy from the reader. Before that point the "monster" is seen by the reader as a creature trying to be human. He has to learn the basic survival skills; he knows virtually nothing. He especially hooks the readers sympathy in his want for companionship. He says that if he had a woman "monster to be his companion, the "gratification" would make him content (pg. 105) and that that would "free him from the misery [he] felt".

| Side: Yes
1 point

There is one time where the monster deserves society's sympathy. This is seen through the response of Walton on page 163. The monster said over the dead Victor, "that is also my victim" pg 163. By Victor's death the monster is now free from the murders of the others. Yet the monster was indeed the death of Victor. However, Walton had suspended his duty to kill the monster by a "mixture of curiosity and compassion" pg163. The monster displays deep remorse for Victor's death on page 164. In the end Walton lets the monster go. The monster goes forth to die a lonely death. Hence, sympathy is made complete with that notion on page 166.

| Side: Yes
1 point

On the other hand, the monster has not been accepted among society. He questions why he lives, why he appears repugnant, and why his creator does not show the care and love to him like the cottagers show each other. The monster was self-motivated; he taught himself to articulate sounds and has observed the sentiments sensed by human beings. Although the monster understood murdering the young boy was iniquitous, he was not taught the full-blown consequences of his actions. The monster killed the nephew to receive Frankenstein’s attention as well as make Frankenstein suffer for not being there to nurture him. The monster is like a child at the stage of grasping the concept of right and wrong but not fully understanding the situation. When the monster asked Frankenstein to “create the same species, and have the same defects,” (p. 104) he wanted someone he could relate with. In Frankenstein’s family, each member has the support from another while the monster does not. Because the monster is not given, a chance throughout society because of his appearance allows him to earn sympathy.

| Side: Yes
1 point

A case can be made for either side of this argument. The monster is a human, but not completely. He has cognitive skills and the ability to reason, but doesn't always use them. An example of this is when he strangles the boy on page 102. He recognizes that the action was wrong, but does not stop himself because he possesses an inherent rage and desire for revenge. The sympathy comes from the reader's understanding of the monster's circumstance and his exile from any social interaction because of the simple fact that Victor had created him in such a manner that he was the most hideous creature any person had ever seen. His regret and inherent social barriers are what give him the sympathy of the reader.

| Side: Yes
3 points

I believe that the reader's attitude towards the monster is meant to change throughout the story. At first, the monster displays his inherent gentle nature. He truly longs for the affection and love of humanity. At that point, the reader is meant to sympathize with him, and we cheer him on, hoping that he will gain acceptance of humanity. He deserves it.

However, specifically looking at this section, I think that our attitude is meant to shift away from that sympathy we felt earlier into horror at what Frankenstein's creation has become. His true nature made us sympathize with him, but his nurture has made him into something loathsome. This can be summed up when the monster decides: "if I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear" and goes about maliciously murdering the innocent Clerval and Elizabeth. These murders are not in passion. They are calculated to bring suffering to Frankenstein and mankind. At this point, this murderer doesn't deserve our sympathy anymore. He needs to be destroyed.

| Side: No
2 points

The monster, at first, was naïve and knew nothing about the world. He saw beauty in the simplest of things, but was soon altered by society. The monster learned about kingdoms, laws, customs, and murder. When he came across the latter, he proclaimed on page 84 “I could not conceive how one man could go forth to murder.” However, after society and his friends repeatedly rejected him because of his appearance, the being turned into a true monster. The monster knew what he was doing was wrong. He knew that killing poor William would destroy Frankenstein, and he even admitted that after killing Herval he was “heartbroken and overcome” (164). “When I run over the frightful catalogue of my sins, I cannot believe that I am the same creature whose thoughts were once filled with sublime and transcendent visions of the beauty and the majesty of goodness” (165). While at first the monster was a gentle soul, the fact that he was destined to never be happy urged the monster to destroy the innocent lives of William, Justine, Henry, and Elizabeth.

| Side: No
2 points

I do not believe that the monster deserves sympathy from the reader because of his cruel actions towards Victor. Although the monster only wants Victor to create a mate for him, to share affection with, he kills innocent lives to avenge his poor lifestyle. The monster executes the murders on purpose, as he warns Victor that his hours will be passed, "in dread and misery" (124). In the end Victor wanted to take back the wrongs he did, however the monster does not allow him to change for the better. Therefore, the monster does not deserve the reader's sympathy.

| Side: No
1 point

The monster does not earn sympathy in some respects. He was wronged by Frankenstein, "I have endured incalculable fatigue, and cold, and hunger; do you dare destroy my hopes?"(pg. 122). He deserves sympathy for the mistreatment he has had by his creator, but he does not deserve sympathy for the murders he has committed and the state of mind that the monster has placed Frankenstein in. After each murder, Frankenstein is sent into a miserable and sick state of existence, "I lay for two months on the point of death: my ravings, as I heard, were frightful; I called myself the murderer of William, of Justine, and of Clerval."(pg.130). The monster had a right to be upset with Frankenstein, but he could have left the others alone. He knew the difference between right and wrong, from his time of watching the people in the cottage. The monster should not have killed the others because they did not even know of him nor did they create him. His grudge was with Frankenstein and he should have punished the source of his pain, not Frankenstein's loved ones.

| Side: No
1 point

In the end, I do not think that the monster deserved sympathy from the reader. Initially, yes, the author intended for the reader to feel bad for the monster. He gave the monster lines such as "Have I not suffered enough" and portrayed the monster as heartbroken. However, toward the end of the book, the monster seemed less naive and he was shown as smart which meant that he knew what he was doing when he killed all of those people. The author is no longer portraying this sympathetic attitude. This is especially evident in the way that the monster warns Frankenstein that "[He] shall be with [Frankenstein] on [his] wedding night". This is no longer a heat of the moment attack, the monster is committing pre meditated murder. That is in no way earning sympathy.

| Side: No
1 point

Though the monster does deserve much sympathy for his being abandoned by his creator and father, he can also be seen as not deserving sympathy for his terrible deeds he is brought to. The "monster" is highly upset by Frankenstein deciding to not create his companion that he decides to take it out on him. The "monster" is brought to the point of threatening Frankenstein, which is a quality very undeserving of sympathy. He tells Frankenstein "I shall be with you on your wedding-night." This threat is a major part of the reason Frankenstein even agrees to complete the task that he is skeptical of. Not only does the "monster" threaten Frankenstein, he is also brought to the unbecoming task of murder. The "monster" is so angered by Frankenstein not keeping his promise that he decides to kill the people closest to Frankenstein. Frankenstein has the regretful duty of finding his dear friend Henry dead. A murder which Frankenstein is even accused of. Frankenstein even has to find Elizabeth's body, "the murderous mark of the fiend's grasp was on her neck, and the breath had ceased to be the Elizabeth whom I had loved." For his terrible deeds he did in order to avenge himself, the "monster" deserves no sympathy.

| Side: No
1 point

The monster was benevolent in the beginning. The monster “had been accustomed, during the night, to steal a part of their store for [his] own consumption, but when [he] found that in doing this [he] inflicted pain on the cottagers, [he] abstained and satisfied myself with berries, nuts, and roots” (p. 172). The monster was inherently compassionate to the point of obsession. He felt that people he had never even spoken to were his family. He became fixated with the cottagers, and when they were terrified by him, the monster was devastated. The monster’s whole world came crashing down. He then looked for someone to blame. He became obsessed with taking vengeance. The monster’s obsessive nature triggered misfortunes. This does not warrant sympathy because his misfortunes were due to the nature of his being.

| Side: No
1 point

The moster says " I will work at your destruction, nor finish until I desolate your heart" (Ch17). The monster will not be sated until he harms Frankenstein beyond repair. He is obsessive with Frankenstein's demise.

| Side: No
1 point

In my most humble opinion i do not think that the monster had earned any sympathy. On page 106 Victor states, "I tried to stifle these sensations; i thought, that as could not sympathise with him, I had no right to withhold from him the small portion of happiness which was yet in my power to behold." No one, not even his creator wants to sympathize with the monster. The monster cares not for the human beings around him. He killed Justine, William, Henry and Elizabeth out of revenge and anger toward Frankenstien. Further more this was only because on page 122, Frankenstien breaks his promise to make a female companion for the monster. This is when the monster commences to kill Henry and vow to kill Elizabeth on her wedding night.

| Side: No
1 point

The monster was filled with volatile emotions; one moment he would be hopeful and next full of rage. He had a barbaric nature that was unwarranted. He does not deserve sympathy because he was innately bad. He received bad treatment and his was response was “This was the reward for my benevolence! I had saved a human being from destruction, and as recompense I now writhed under the miserable pain of a wound which shattered flesh and bone. The feelings of kindness and gentleness which I had entertained but a few moments before gave place to hellish rage and gnashing teeth” (p. 219) The monster, when hurt, immediately jumps to a vow of “eternal hatred and vengeance to all mankind” (p. 219-220). The monster does not merit sympathy because he chose his violent path that left him desolate.

| Side: No
1 point

More evidence: The moster stated "I will revenge my injuries... I will cause fear" (Ch 17) The monster is unkind and out to cause harm.

| Side: No
1 point

The monster does not deserve sympathy at this point in the book. At this point, he is fairly intelligent and completely understands what he is doing. In earlier chapters, he deserved a lot of sympathy. For example, when he kills William, he doesn't completely understand what he is doing. The act was not premeditated. He heard that the child was related to Frankenstein, so acted out of anger and strangled the poor boy. At this point, on the other hand, the monster is planning out his malicious actions. He kills Frankenstein's friends in order to make Frankenstein regret declining his request for a friend. I think that he should have taken his anger out directly on Frankenstein instead of killing other innocent people who did not deserve to die. "I saw the lifeless form of Henry Clerval stretched before me," explains Frankenstein when he is shown the remains of his dear friend (P.129). "I heard a shrill and dreadful scream.... She was there, lifeless and inanimate, thrown across the bed, her head hanging down, and her pale and distorted features half covered by her hair," describes Frankenstein after his wife is murdered (P. 144). "While I still hung over her in agony of despair, I happened to look up.... I saw at the open window a figure the most hideous and abhorred. A grin was on the face of the monster; he seemed to jeer, as with his fiendish finger he pointed towards the corpse of my wife," (P. 145). The monster knew exactly what he was doing and had even planned the murder of sweet Elizabeth. She did not deserve to die. The monster does not deserve sympathy from humanity at this point because he is heartlessly murdering undeserving people.

| Side: No
1 point

I believe that it is hard for people to sympathize with the monster. Throughout the book, he is portrayed as an evil creature who relentlessly murders innocent people. Frankenstein constantly refers to the monster as a “daemon” and a “fiend” (150). He also says that he has been “cursed by some devil” (151-153). The monster has also made decisions that he knew were wrong. He viciously murdered several of Frankenstein’s friends and family to seek revenge. Frankenstein said, “The death of William, the execution of Justine, the murder of Clerval, and lastly of my wife; even at that moment I knew not that my only remaining friends were safe from the malignity of the fiend; my father even now might be writhing under his grasp” (146). The monster took out all of his rage and rampantly killed several of Frankenstein’s loved ones. When Frankenstein finds the corpse of his wife he sees the monster. “…I saw at the open window a figure the most hideous and abhorred. A grin was on the face of the monster; he seemed to jeer, as with his fiendish finger he pointed towards the corpse of wife” (145). At this point, I think it is very hard for humanity to sympathize with him. He is pleased with the murder of an innocent woman. This would be a case of nurture because the monster has become very violent and reckless due to his situation.

| Side: No
1 point

The monster does not earn sympathy because on page 101 he exclaims out "this was then the reward of my benevolence! I had saved a human being from destruction, and as a recompense I now writhed under the miserable pain of a wound which shattered the flesh and bone". By the monster saying this, it shows how outraged he is for not receiving accolade, which gives the monster some sympathy. But then the monster then said "The few feelings of kindness and gentleness , which I had entertained but a few moments before, gave place to hellish rage and gnashing of teeth. Inflamed by pain, I vowed eternal hatred and vengeance to all mankind", which shows that the monster is filled with agony and hatred. To deserve sympathy, one must display the ability to return sympathy; the monster is not doing so.

| Side: No
1 point

The monster does not deserve sympathy. Although he was created merely on curiosity, the monster was diluted minded and spiteful. He continued to make Victor’s life a living hell as he follows him around and takes away the life of innocent people. Sure Victor should have gave into the monster’s only request however the monster is unaware of the problems he had created. This can be seen when Victor points out the pros and cons of creating another monster despite the fact that the monster is upset and vulnerable, “I am malicious because I am miserable. Am I not shunned and hated by all mankind? You, my creator, could tear me to pieces and triumph…”(page 104). The reader can assume that the monster knows better than to go on a rage as earlier in Frankenstein the monster shows compassion and care. The monster takes care of the family as he cuts firewood for the family in the cottage. It’s of the monster’s nature to be thankful for those that give him something in return. In Victor’s case, he gives the monster a life however something so precious is overlooked by the monster. The monster continually instigates the things that happen to Victor. This can relate to human nature as the monster in a way resembles human’s despite his disgusting appearance and can understand or be extremely ignorant of the effects of one’s actions. As said before the monster knows better than to think before doing as he reaped the benefits of the cottage family being happy for his act of kindness. The monster cannot get over Victor’s course of action and kills his beloved wife,”I escaped from them to the room where lay the body of Elizabeth, my love, my wife, so lately living, so dear, so worthy. She had been moved from the posture in which I had first beheld her…” (page 145). It is not of the monster’s nature to kill however due to his lack of nuturing and extreme resentment he does things out of spite.

| Side: No
1 point

I don't think that the monster deserves sympathy. The monster has is perfectly capable of associating what's right and wrong. He didn't have to go on a vengeance filled rampage. The monster was completely aware of his decisions and knew what they would cause. "I am malicious because I am miserable." He knew what he was and why the Frankenstein didn't want to make another.

| Side: No
1 point

The monster does not deserve sympathy from humans because he proves to the reader that he understands right from wrong. When “Felix darted forward, and with supernatural force tore the monster from Felix’s father…Felix dashed the monster to the ground and struck him violently with a stick. The monster could have torn him limb from limb but he refrained.” (p. 97) He (the monster) understood the damage he could have done and he understood that fighting back would not get him anywhere. Later on in the novel, when the monster met up with Frankenstein he says “you are my creator, but I am your master; - obey me.” When the monster killed Frankenstein’s nephew, he did it out of spite, for revenge. After speculating the various emotions the cottagers experienced, he knew what caused in pain and knew what pain he intended to inflict upon Frankenstein.

| Side: No
1 point

No, The Monster doesn't deserve sympathy because the author makes it obvious that the hideous creature is intelligent enough to conform to human society and his malicious behavior is an act of rebellion against his creator. In addition, The Monster attempted to learn the history of a group of people and even learned the language of them, which shows his intelligence is above average. The Monster's behavior is not from grief due to loneliness or lack of attention, but it is an attempt for his own creator to accept him. After The Monster gets shot by a man due to his appearance, he goes back to his creator, to seek at least one person that will accept him. The real sympathy should be directed towards Victor because he realizes the error of his ways too late and is now in a situation that he cannot handle. Victor displays his dismay on page 121: "I left the room, and, locking the door, made a solemn vow in my own heart never to resume my labours." Sympathy is truely earned for Victor, because he had to create a monster to realize that companionship is an essential peace to human life.

| Side: No
1 point

Whether he nurture had anything to do with his violence and lust for revenge is neither here nor there. His nature is that of a murderer and a seeker of vengeance. The attitude of the reader is meant to change throughout the story. It shifts from sympathy to abhorrence for his violent nature and his true intentions.

| Side: No
1 point

The monster was filled with volatile emotions; one moment he would be hopeful and next full of rage. He had a barbaric nature that was unwarranted. He does not deserve sympathy because he was innately bad. He received bad treatment and his was response was “This was the reward for my benevolence! I had saved a human being from destruction, and as recompense I now writhed under the miserable pain of a wound which shattered flesh and bone. The feelings of kindness and gentleness which I had entertained but a few moments before gave place to hellish rage and gnashing teeth” (p. 219) The monster, when hurt, immediately jumps to a vow of “eternal hatred and vengeance to all mankind” (p. 219-220). The monster does not merit sympathy because he chose his violent path that left him desolate.

| Side: No


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