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10
35
Yes No
Debate Score:45
Arguments:25
Total Votes:47
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 Yes (9)
 
 No (16)

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Mint_tea(3253) pic



Should colleges punish students who sing songs?

A sports team of a major University was singing a song on the top 40 charts that happened to have the "N" word in it.  Because they sang it they are now being reprimanded and have to speak to the Black Organization Council regarding the use of the word that is in the song, the President of the University even came down on them for it.  Personally I find that ridiculous.  It's a song in the top 40's, they weren't singing it BECAUSE it was a way to say the "N" word and they weren't going around shouting racial slurs...... they were simply singing a popular song.  But perhaps I'm just seeing one side to it so, what do you think?

Yes

Side Score: 10
VS.

No

Side Score: 35
2 points

Well, to solve this perplexing dilemma I feel we must engage the universally accepted mathematical formula of ''the counting-out rhyme'' to make a decision.

Eeny meeny miny moe,

Catch a nigger by the toe,

If he squeals let him go,

Eeny meeny miny moe.

So, by using this scientific method of calculation to solve this potentially inflammatory issue the conclusion is no.

The world has gone nigger mad, and that is as mad as it gets.

Side: Yes
1 point

It depends.

Schools and School Divisions and Leagues all have charters and rules for conduct. Some are more strictly enforced than others. And those rules are better know by the program heads than by the students participating... So... That means if the students just spontaneously broke into that song and didn't realize it violated a code of conduct then I would agree the college should not be punishing them any more than just pointing out their concern it was insensitive. And that also means if the program director knew all about it, and helped them prepare it, despite knowing what the conduct rules were, then it's fair game to punish the program as a whole and the particiapting students as participants in it.

Basiclally I'm not trying to be hard nosed on this at all, but if there is a clear intent by all involved to violate a code of conduct then it's valid to punish.

Side: Yes
1 point

I want them to learn what it is to be a black slave. They won't use the word again after a week in the life.

Side: Yes
6 points

So is it ok if you’re a black and you sing a song with the word Nigga in it ? It appears it’s no problem if a black uses the term but blue murder ensues if a white uses the word

Side: No
3 points

Right? Like...how ridiculous would it be to deny whites the ability to enjoy hip/hop/rap/ any music that may have the word in it, or to allow them to sing along but the moment the "N" word comes up go silent? Seems a might racist itself.

Side: No
2 points

Maybe if the white people used the word Tiga ( tiger) instead people like Excon might be placated as he believes in “ limited “ freedom of speech , then again the rappers might take offence at the term tiga

Side: No
excon(5818) Disputed
0 points

Hello D:

When a white person uses it, it means ONE thing.. When a black person uses it, it means something else.. They KNOW the difference.. Apparently, you don't..

excon

Side: Yes
Dermot(4989) Disputed
3 points

So black people in the U S call each other Nigga but it means something else totally , like what exactly ?

Also why do a lot of blacks in the U S feel totally embarrassed and offended at rappers who’s use this term no doubt you could explain it to them seeing as you’re white and therefore know ?

Side: No
marcusmoon(468) Disputed
2 points

Hi Excon,

When a white person uses it, it means ONE thing.. When a black person uses it, it means something else.

The problem is that this is not necessarily the case. It is not even necessarily the case that all racist white people always mean the same thing when saying the word. There is more to the context than the speaker's race or ethnicity.

Most words have multiple definitions, both connotative and denotative. Words that are sometimes used as racial slurs are no different. The IDEA being expressed in the statement is part of the context that indicates which definition is appropriate to the word.

It is lamentable that we are at a point where if anyone wants to discuss what different people mean by the word (e.g., Chris Rock, a social scientist, or a linguist) if the speaker says the actual word instead of saying "N-word," some people jump to the unfounded (and unfair and slanderous, and destructive) conclusion that the speaker must be racist.

There is also the problem of pointed misinterpretation of the speaker's intent when some of these words are used in irony, satire, and imitation/ characterization in order to make a point.

Side: No
Mint_tea(3253) Clarified
1 point

What about when a white person sings it in a song written by a black person?

Side: Yes
3 points

It amazes me that merely saying certain words has come to be considered racist, offensive, etc., regardless of the context and message being expressed with the word.

That is analogous to people being incapable of distinguishing between eggs and an omelette, and therefore assuming that eggs can only make omelettes, not cakes, soufflés, quiches, fritadas, etc..

I remember a time when the IDEA expressed had to be unkind, discriminatory, or slanderous in order for anybody to care.

Now, just saying certain words is grounds for accusations of racism, even when discussing the word and its usage, denotations, and connotations.

What is most distressing is that this absurdity seems to be most common in Universities. This indicates that supposedly educated administrators and faculty are unable to distinguish between a word and an idea that may or may not be expressed by that word when it is combined with other words. If they hear a racial slur, they assume the speaker is only using that word to slur someone.

When did the inability to think clearly about simple things stop being a job requirement for working at a university?

Side: No
2 points

I think in this instance, the term "snowflake" could be quite easily applied to the people who over-reacted to this.

Side: No
1 point

Mint,

I think in this instance, the term "snowflake" could be quite easily applied to the people who over-reacted to this.

You are such a nice person.

Snowflake is such a mild term, especially when fascist and poorly educated nincompoop are so much more apt.

Side: No
2 points

It appears the perceived status quo is something along the lines of "bigoted is the worst thing you can be" and "standing up for oppressed groups is the best thing you can do". As such, it makes sense that people/organizations would want to act like this, as they believe it will make people view them favorably. Social ostracism is, evolutionarily speaking, the same as death and thus people seek social acceptance with the same zeal as any of their other life-preserving drives.

Side: No
1 point

Would you agree that to punish the student for this "infraction" would be tantamount to fawning for approval from a certain group or groups? Or would it be more of a desperate attempt to show how PC the higher ups are by throwing their students under the bus?

Side: No
1 point

You Special Jewel could you expose yourself any further as being a Totalitarian?

Let me guess you are a Moderate LMMFAO !!!!!!!!!

Side: No
Mint_tea(3253) Disputed
1 point

So far very little you've posted has had anything to do with the debate. Post your opinion about the topic of the debate, I assume you have one regarding this or are you just keen to waste your time?

Side: Yes

It's just a song in the top 40 containing the N word and probably sung by a Black person to Black fans who probably sing it themselves, so no, no one should be punished for saying what Black people say all the time.

Side: No