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Debate Info

56
81
Vegetarianism Omnivore
Debate Score:137
Arguments:67
Total Votes:181
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 Vegetarianism (29)
 
 Omnivore (38)

Debate Creator

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Vegetarianism vs Omnivore

To be an omnivore means you eat steak, hotdogs, brussel sprouts, hamburgers, ribs, all these yummy foods, in the process, killing something (in the brussell sprout's case, it's you. you might kill the cook first though...hmmmm...).


But to be a vegetarian, you don't harm anyone (except yourself...brussell sprouts), but you don't get to eat all the yummy foods omnivores eat.

So, what would you chose? If the whole world world change because of your choice, and no one would care or notice the diffence, what would you chose?

Vegetarianism

Side Score: 56
VS.

Omnivore

Side Score: 81
4 points

I am not a vegetarian but they have some good arguments on their side. One says that our digestive track is long and matches that of other animals – the ones that don’t eat meat…

We know for a fact eating been increases the chance of getting the #3 killer in the US – colon cancer. And when people check they usually find vegetarians have a near zero cancer rate and heart attack rate well below average.

http://www.chooseveg.com/cancer.asp

| Side: Vegetarianism
4 points

One says that our digestive track is long and matches that of other animals – the ones that don’t eat meat

And you explain the presence of teeth specially adapted to the disintegration of meat... how?

| Side: Omnivore
0 points

it would appear that, as omnivores, we have the capability and impulse to eat plants AND meat.

who would have guessed?

In addition to carnivore teeth, the high level of proteases in our digestive juices break high concentrations of protein- such as meat.

Anyone who makes the claim that people are herbivores is idiotic

Anyone who makes the claim that people are carnivores is idiotic

Homo sapiens sapiens are omnivores, which means similarities to both herbivores and carnivores

| Side: Omnivore
3 points

yay you!! you did reasearch, and i agree totally. i'm not a vegi. eater to, but people can NOT say they give you enough vitamins or calcium or minerals or energy or anything. my best friend it a vegi. eater, and she is really energetic, and she it healthier than a horse. and if you are a vegi. eater, healthier than a healthy cow.

:)

| Side: Vegetarianism
aveskde(1903) Disputed
3 points

I am not a vegetarian but they have some good arguments on their side. One says that our digestive track is long and matches that of other animals – the ones that don’t eat meat…

We are omnivores. Herbivores have a special digestive system that can break down the complex sugars in vegetative matter. What we call fiber is material that ought to be digestible but isn't.

| Side: Omnivore
4 points

Vegetarianism is the quickest and easiest way to save the world. From what, you ask? Pretty much everyting.

Global Warming (or Climate Change, if you prefer)

Cows produce around 18 percent of the worlds greenhouse gasses (mostly through Methane--yes cow farts), which is more than the entire transportation industry (every car, airplane (include Al Gore's jet), boat, train, tractor, Hummer, helicopter, and Ski-Do) does. If the world became vegetarian, this number would be seriously reduced. (Yes, we'd still have farting termites to deal with....) With more room to grow plants, it would also help cut through CO2 via photosynthisis.

Global Food Shortage

Various sources show that cows eat much more food than they produce (numbers range from 7 to 16 pounds of grain for every pound of beef). Using the most conservative number, not eating beef would mean not only 7 times more food in the world, but around 15 times more room to plant more plants (you can feed 15 people with corn grown in the same space as it takes for feeding 1 person with cows). Chickens and other small poultry have lower numbers (around 2 pounds of grain for 1 pound of meat), but that's still a massive benefit.

Global Water Shortage

Growing cows takes around 100 times as much water as it does growing apples (which consume quite a lot of water compared with other food-giving plants).

Also, if used properly, a vegetarian diet is much more healthy than an omnivore one. (On a list of the best foods, only two meat items were present--Salmon and anchovies, neither of which are farmed, nor do they fart).

Supporting Evidence: Vegetarians Save the Planet (michaelbluejay.com)
| Side: Vegetarianism
1 point

But if noone were to kill and eat the cows, pigs and sheep, they'd reproduce to such numbers by eating all the plants we would then sow that, as you mention, the amount of methane gas flowing into the atmosphere will eventually kill us!

| Side: About as serious as dust
clearEn(207) Disputed
1 point

Except if people stopped farming cows, their numbers would drop dramatically to natural numbers. Like bison, there would probably only be a few thousand free-roaming cows and pigs.

Now if we hunted cows, your argument would be valid.

| Side: Omnivore
2 points

If I could change to vegetarianism, I most defiantly would. It's healthier, kinder, and happier. Also, I wouldn't be serving my best friend, who is a vegetarian, sausage pizza. Unfortunately, I can not stick to a decision. I can't even stay angry at someone for twenty minutes. I can't save money if my life depended on it. Therefore, the next time I saw meat laid in front of me, I might not eat it. The second time, and the third time, and for about a week I might not eat meat. But then I'd forget, and go back to eating meat like the monster I am.

| Side: Vegetarianism
TheDane(24) Disputed
3 points

Why is it healthier to be a vegetarian? As I remember it, vegetarians have trouble acquiring amino acids and zinc.

| Side: Omnivore
Liddy(36) Disputed
1 point

That's not true, the same can be said for someone who eats meat, the incidence of iron and zinc deficiency among long-term vegetarians is similar to that of non-vegetarians. It all depends on how well a person manages their diet. Whole grains and legumes provide all the amino acid and zinc a person needs, and it never hurts to supplement your diet, whether you eat meat or not, with vitamins.

| Side: Vegetarianism
2 points

Haha, that was interesting..... please NEVER do it again. Yeah, I think humans as a race are kind of bigoted. We think we're so much better than everyone else, but we're not.

| Side: Vegetarianism
1 point

we're bigoted...it's why we have farms and pets and zoos and stuff. But please, please,please,please,please,please,please,please,please,please....Do not make me give up my MILK!!!!

| Side: Vegetarianism
2 points

I. WOULD. DIE. No, really. Take away cheese and other dairy products and I may have a mental break down. But the thing that I don't get is that people are so against hurting and killing animals, but they eat them.

| Side: Vegetarianism
clearEn(207) Disputed
1 point

It's funny. A few years ago, I would die without milk. But since then I've switched to soy milk (Silk, I've found, doesn't taste too funky for the switch), and now I can't even stand cow milk.

I'm still addicted to ice-cream, though :P

| Side: Vegetarianism
1 point

Because it's really not worth it to kill animals because some really odd people like the taste. Personally, the thought of eating meat makes me feel sick.

| Side: Vegetarianism
nummi(1435) Disputed
0 points

Because it's really not worth it to kill plants because some really odd people like the taste. Personally, the thought of eating vegetables makes me feel sick.

Get it? You're being a hypocrite. Plants are alive just as are all animals. You eat plants - you kill them in the process. In order to survive something else must be killed and consumed. It might change in the far future but that's nowhere near.

To have a life as healthy as possible we, humans, presently need to eat both animals and plants.

| Side: Omnivore
Elvira(3315) Disputed
1 point

Fruit, leaves, that doesn't kill plants. And plants are mostly clones- especially lettuces. They have no individuality- they're plants. They don't scream, or bite you when you step on their foot. They just grow and reproduce.

| Side: Vegetarianism
-1 points

Healthier than a meat/dead flesh diet. There is also the ethical issue. Should I eating dead diseased animal tissue, or fresh living vegetable tissue(yes plants have dna)? Not a hard decision to make.

| Side: Vegetarianism
chatturgha(1641) Disputed
0 points

Healthier than a meat/dead flesh diet.

I lost 60 lbs on an all-meat, diet when I was younger.

The buildup of protein also gave me a head start of brain-growth ahead of you idiots who think it's unethical to eat animals. Which leads me to your other point...

There is also the ethical issue. Should I eating dead diseased animal tissue, or fresh living vegetable tissue(yes plants have dna)? Not a hard decision to make.

None of the dead tissue I eat is diseases; it's all cooked. It's a basic omnivorous and carnivorous instinct found in many animals, even, to do as much as they can to make the dead carcass of meat healthier to eat (frogs clean off bugs they eat with their feet, wolverines carefully remove the intestines of their kills before eating to prevent disease).

Why would you be so silly as to assume the flesh I eat is diseased? And if it was diseased, there's no ethical issue in choosing to eat the plant matter, more like an issue of what's common sense.

On another point, sushi is 'uncooked' fish, but this is actually untrue. The liquid seasonings put on sushi always have a molecular acid (the same thing that makes fruit you eat sour and/or bitter) that kills all bacteria and cooks the 'raw' fish to make it safe to eat.

And on one last point, plants can be diseased to; the difference is that a fool like you won't be able to tell when a plant is diseased, meaning that, as a vegetarian moron, you will always choose a wild plant before a dead carcass and have an equal chance between both choices to ingest something dangerous.

The difference between you and a normal person though is that at least the normal person has grown their brain enough the protein to at least sit by and decide what to eat until the choice is absolutely necessary to make.

| Side: Omnivore
Liddy(36) Disputed
1 point

Eating meat has nothing to do with having a large brain, science has already disputed that argument. Elephants have the largest brain size of all land mammals, does that make them more intelligent than human beings?

Human beings are the only supposed "omnivorous" species who cooks and seasons their meat, all others eat it raw. When you eat your meat fresh off the bone all juicy with blood, then you can come back here and claim your a true omnivore, til then your argument that human beings are omnivorous is invalid.

About dead flesh being diseased, why do you think it's insisted that you cook it thoroughly? Do you think mad cow disease fell out of the sky?

And your argument about meat having all this protein, more protein can be found in a stalk of broccoli than a pound of beef. For someone who is so sure that they aren't a fool, you really do say some foolish things.

| Side: Vegetarianism
-2 points
Elvira(3315) Disputed
1 point

meh .

| Side: Omnivore
6 points

I hardly consume many vegetables as it is. Sure, I'll have a salad from time to time, but it pales in comparison to all the bacon, beef, ham, bologna, hamburger, chicken, turkey, pork, steak, jerky, and ribs I eat. If anything, I'm a Carnivore.

| Side: Carnivore
Liddy(36) Disputed
0 points

You must have an extremely large ass... Your heart is probably clogged with plaque from bad cholesterol as well... O_o

| Side: Vegetarianism
TheHallow1(69) Disputed
5 points

"You must have an extremely large ass... Your heart is probably clogged with plaque from bad cholesterol as well... O_o"

No and no. I exercise and eat just fine. The protein in the meat serves my muscle build. Something alot of vegetarians sorely lack.

| Side: Carnivore
1 point

The heart thing I agree with :/

But the first thing is a good thing !

| Side: Vegetarianism
3 points

I don't see the merits of moral arguments for vegetarianism. When you eat vegetables, you're killing living things too.

Seeing as how your food must come from killing anyway, you might as well eat some meat to get a more varied and healthy diet.

| Side: Omnivore
zombee(1024) Disputed
2 points

While I don't think an omnivorous diet is inescapably immoral, surely you can see the difference in capacity for suffering between plants and animals?

| Side: Vegetarianism
Peekaboo(708) Disputed
2 points

Depends how you rear and kill the animals, I think. There isn't much of a difference between killing animals quickly and relatively painlessly, and killing plants which apparently feel no pain or anxiety.

| Side: Omnivore
Liddy(36) Disputed
2 points

Vegetables have no nervous system, therefore they cannot suffer or feel pain. What a dummy. Next! O_O

| Side: Vegetarianism
Peekaboo(708) Disputed
3 points

Firstly, please read the replies I made to other people who disputed my argument here: I have already touched on the issue of pain.

Secondly, while plants certainly do not feel pain in the way that humans do, they are responsive to stimuli, and there are suggestions that they feel anxiety. A Google search on "do plants feel pain" will give you a basic overview. I don't have a strong stance as to whether this claim is true or not, but it does bear thinking about.

Lastly, downvoting large numbers of people for having different views from yours is immature to the extreme.

| Side: Omnivore
amd326(68) Disputed
1 point

Yes, put plants don't think. Animals can. No mattter what plant you find, they cannot think for themselves. And does fish count as meat? If they don't, what makes them different?

| Side: Vegetarianism
Peekaboo(708) Disputed
2 points

Plants don't think in the way that humans do, and neither do animals. But plants do respond to stimuli, and they eat and grow and reproduce like living creatures. They're less humanlike than animals, that's all.

And yeah, I'd definitely count fish as meat, as do general vegetarians.

| Side: Omnivore
clearEn(207) Disputed
-1 points

Although there are plenty of ways to eat healthy without meat. A variety of beans have all the proteins humans need, while the added vegetables and fruits provide fiber. Vegetables tend to be low in calories, meaning you can eat until you're full and not break a diet.

The problem with this is that most vegetarians eat highly processed foods, which aren't nearly as healthy as the fresh variety, and probably less healthy than meat.

| Side: Vegetarianism
Peekaboo(708) Disputed
2 points

Yeah, apparently it's possible to be healthy on a vegetarian diet - but due to the restrictions, it takes a lot more planning and nutrition awareness. If someone pursues vegetarianism for health reasons, that shouldn't be a worry as they'll probably be careful to balance their diet.

But a number of people who turn vegetarian for moral/religious reasons forget to take nutrition into account, and think that being vegetarian is a simple matter of just not eating meat... which can be disastrous. Take iron for example - while you can get decent quantities of iron from basically anything that is meat, to get it from vegetarian sources you need to pick out certain types of food and also eat them in greater quantities than you would for meat, and preferably also eat complementary foods that help iron absorption.

With vegetarian children there's a particular risk of deficiency; a lot of children are prone to dislike veges, and their smaller stomachs often simply can't take in enough veges to meet all their dietary requirements.

If you eat meat, you can have a relatively healthy diet just by eating some of everything while avoiding obviously bad foods like high saturated fat / high sugar. With a vegetarian diet you need to be way more careful, and unfortunately a lot of people just aren't that careful.

| Side: Omnivore

Omnivore is what everyone should be.

Vegans are weak and pathetic from lack of proper nutrition, don't trust those pale bastards as they are usually leftists.

Now shut up and gimme a medium rare steak. LOL

| Side: Omnivore
2 points

I couldn't imagine a world without meat.Sure we have to kill animals but they kill other animals all they time.Plus we get our nutrition from them

| Side: Omnivore
2 points

No doubt! Meat is just too tasty not to have... I couldn't imagine going the rest of my life without bacon!

| Side: Omnivore
2 points

I'm a carnivorous mammal, but I support both sides, as I tend to eat lots of veggies too. There's a brazilian guy on youtube who made a quite funny sentence about it: he shows a cow on the green field, and he sais "My food shits on yours." :D

But I really support both sides of it. I can't imagine myself not eating chicken and fish (I think veggies don't eat fish...), and ham, and pork, and all those kinds of delicious stuff.

I can understand their point of view, I would only be courageous enough to kill a pig if I was desperately starving. Furthermore I can understand the whole animal compassion on their side.

At the same time I understand that we are an omnivorous animal wether we want it or not, only we have the capacity to choose. And the life cycle goes through living beings surviving by feeding on other living beings. Eating plants is also eating living beings. Althoguh they apparently don't suffer when we cut a piece of them, or the whole, and their lives are supposedly vague. But looking at tigers feeding on carcasses, and hyennas piccking up the leftovers, and vultures come later to wash the dishes, I believe that that's life. I can't do anything about it.

The only thing that would ever make me turn veggie, but it still hasn't got me into it, is the mass production of meat. This implies hundreds of thousands or millions of pigs and chickens and cows and whatever else, to be raised and fed in a massive scale, just to be massively killed and feed a massive horde of hungry humans. This is a disgusting half-necessary evil action that humans make...

Someone once told me tho, that ever since he was a vegetarian, he felt lighter, healthier and calmer than ever. That's something to think about.

| Side: Omnivore
2 points

Yummy plants and animals. Embracing my evolutionary animal. :)

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

Foods just aren't as tasty without animals in them. So I'd have to pick omnivore.

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

Considering how greasy things are now-a-days (I can't eat bacon, sausage, hotdogs...etc.) it wouldn't be that hard to be a vegetarian. I do eat meat though, it is good for you. But I don't think it would hurt (especially since we're like #1 in Obese Countries) for alot of people to go vegetarian.

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

I like being an omnivore. I can enjoy both the health benefits of meat and veggies without too much effort. :D

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

I have a stomach disorder. And most of the foods that are triggers are fruit and vegetables. Besides that, vegetarism isn't actually easy to follow. It's harder for someone who doesn't drive, living with a family who doesn't support your views. I tried it once, but failed because my family would use it to criticise me. However, I was only 18 y.o. and more sensitive to criticism. My stomach dictates my diet. However, I don't eat meat every day. So my diet is healthier than it could be.

| Side: Omnivore

Our omnivorous diet is what we are programmed to function on. Our human teeth have both carnivore and herbivore characteristics, and our gullets have a mixture of characteristics from both diets as well.

In fact, the only reason our brains evolved and got bigger over time was because we became omnivores and began eating meat as well as fruits. Because of the protein from hunting and eating meat, our brains grew.

Without eating meat, the human race would not be what it is today!

Which is why I'm sure that, eventually, vegetarianism will die out as a large movement of people. Why? Well, the lack of protein will make the vegetarian gene pool so stupid and so, literally, small-brained that they will all die one by one of Darwinism that they will eventually vanish.

Once that happens, the only vegetarians left will be the smart, nice ones... which is almost none of them, since even I have never met a vegetarian who wasn't a colossal asshole in some way, no matter how subtle.

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

Omnivore all the way. Except the fact that we kill off more than we need is kinda stupid. Soon we'll run out and that won't be any good will it..

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

I am not against Vegi . people , but when you choose to eat all the green and stuff , that is basically taking away the animals food and when you take away the animals food , your killing the animals either way .. Just saying

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

AND if you look it up ,Vegi . people are lacking a LOT of cholesterol . Yet we need cholesterol to live . Don't just rely on powered cholesterol .

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

Does anyone else feel WAY TO STRONG for this arguement ? Thats bull

| Side: Omnivore
1 point

What people dont really realize is that ou teeth are strong because they are designed for chewing meat !

People diet based on health, economic conditions or moral beliefs. While a vegan diet consists of no animal products, a carnivore diet includes meat, dairy and all of the other major food groups. There are benefits and drawbacks to each type of diet. However, if you plan your meals carefully, both diets can be healthy and nutritionally sound.

Definitions

A vegan diet is a type of vegetarian eating plan, but where a vegetarian will eat dairy products like milk and cheese, a vegan will not. Vegans eat only plant-based foods, such as grains, nuts, legumes, vegetables and fruits. Carnivores eat both animal and plant-based foods. Their diets will consist of all of the major groups like meat and dairy, as well as grains, vegetables, fruits and beans.

Benefits

Because a vegan diet is solely plant-based, it is packed with vitamins, minerals and other nutrients, like fiber. Furthermore, vegans typically consume fewer calories than carnivores, as well as fewer fat grams, which may better enable them to keep their weight under control. Eating less meat can also significantly lower your risk of premature death from multiple causes. However, a carnivore diet offers benefits as well. Meat consists primarily of protein, which is an essential nutrient for many bodily functions. Dairy products also provide key nutrients, such as calcium and vitamin D, which are imperative for proper growth and development.

Drawbacks

A vegan diet is highly restrictive, and if you do not design it carefully, you can experience significant nutrient deficiencies. Not consuming dairy products puts you at risk for developing a vitamin D and calcium deficiency, and a lack of meat can result in an iron deficiency. Furthermore, since vitamin B-12 is only found in animal products, you must take a supplement to compensate for this. However, a meat-based diet can have health repercussions as well. Diets that include a lot of full-fat dairy and meat will be high in both fat and cholesterol, which can increase your risk of heart disease and obesity. If you eat animal products while limiting vegetables and grains, you also run the risk of missing out on key vitamins and minerals.

Bottom Line

It is possible to get all of the nutrients you need while being vegan, provided that you include a variety of plant foods and take supplements when necessary. You can also be a healthy carnivore by selecting low-fat dairy and lean cuts of meat, while including plant foods as well. No matter what type of diet you choose to follow, consider consulting with a licensed nutritionist. She can help you design an eating plan that excludes or includes certain items, while still providing key nutrients.

| Side: Omnivore
0 points

Being an Omnivore gives you a huge variety of foods making you a healthy person. Every normal person is an Omnivore.

| Side: Omnivore
-2 points


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