CreateDebate


Debate Info

21
15

Nancy Boyda (D)


Lynn Jenkins (R)

Debate Score:36
Arguments:16
Total Votes:38
More Stats

Argument Ratio

side graph
 
 
Nancy Boyda (D)
(8)
 
 
Lynn Jenkins (R)
(8)

Debate Creator

CreateDebate(732) pic



Who should I vote for in the 2008 Kansas 2nd District House of Representatives Race?


Nancy Boyda (D)

Side Score: 21
VS.


Lynn Jenkins (R)

Side Score: 15
3 points

Boyda Shoots for the Gun Vote

Nancy Boyda and her Republican opponent echo each other in their support of the Second Amendment. She opposes any new laws that would inhibit gun rights. Boyda believes that enforcement of current laws should be sufficient in quelling gun violence. The candidate does make a questionable assertion when she claims that violent crime has dropped across the country. In urban areas such as New York, violent crime has actually had a surge.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.nancyforcongress.com)
Side: Nancy Boyda
3 points

Boyda Shoots for the Gun Vote

Nancy Boyda echoes her Republican candidate in her support of the Second Amendment. She oppses any new laws that would inhibit gun rights. Boyda believes that enforcement of current laws should be sufficient in quelling gun violence. The candidate does make a questionable assertion when she claims that violent crime has dropped across the country. In urban areas such as New York, violent crime has actually had a slight surge.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.nancyforcongress.com)
Side: Guns
3 points

Boyda: Kansas’s Natural Resources Will Solve the Energy Crisis

Boyda pledges to utilize Kansas’s natural gifts of arable land and wind to wean America off of its dependence on oil. Corn, wheat, and sorghum crops will be used to make ethanol while soybean crops will be used for biodiesel. Since Kansas is the third windiest state, the Democratic candidate pledges to support federal incentives toward the development of wind technology.

Although these alternatives are promising, they each have shortcomings that Boyda should address. Ethanol and biodiesel pit energy commodities and food commodities against one another. This competition has been linked to the rising cost of food. Lower and middle class citizens may be relieved at the pump, but left hungrier at the dinner table. Further, wind technology is not advanced enough today to be a wide-scale alternative. Like solar power, the issue of storage must be resolved until wind will be a viable alternative.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.nancyforcongress.com)
Side: Energy
3 points

Boyda Attacks the Oil Industry

On a number of fronts Boyda has assaulted the oil industry. She believes that there is something wrong with record profits for oil companies on the one hand and record prices at the pump for consumers on the other. In a tone more antagonist than her Republican rival, Lynn Jenkins, Boyda states, “real reform will require Congress to decisively rein in Big Oil - and regrettably, the oil companies' Washington allies are determined not to let that happen.” The Democratic candidate voted for the Renewable energy and Energy Conservation Act. The act would repeal billions in tax breaks from the oil industry. It would also encourage investment in renewable fuels. (Due to opposition, the bill will likely fail.) Boyda has taken a firm stance and wants to direct the country away from its dependence on oil.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.nancyforcongress.com)
Side: Energy
3 points

Boyda: Critical of NAFTA

The Democratic candidate blames NAFTA for an increased trade deficit, the loss of over a million jobs, and the proliferation of illegal drugs. Boyda coauthored the NAFTA Accountability Act, which would address all of these externalities of the original agreement. However, she supports global trade and states, “America should continue to expand the global economy through new fair trade agreements.”

These two beliefs may prove difficult to reconcile. If America were to abandon NAFTA, it would run the danger of becoming protectionist. Restricting free trade would not be “fair” to other countries. For workers this may be fine, but for consumers, this could mean higher prices since potential competitors are locked outside of competition. Protectionism would consequently stymie economic growth.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.nancyforcongress.com)
Side: Economy
2 points

Illegal immigration, drug trafficking and arms trafficking are problems that citizens would like to see solved, but Boyda claims that the House is making poor decisions, including turning down bill H.R. 1773, the Safe American Roads Act, which would require intense safety criteria for Mexican trucking companies entering the US.

Boyda: “Congress and the American people have stated emphatically they want to end this program…and to end it now. Since the Department of Transportation and now the White House don’t seem to get the message, we have made it crystal clear to them with this legislation. Enough is enough!”

Boyda now hopes that Congress will focus on the problem after recess by considering HR 6330 which will focus on protecting American motorists by prohibiting the Secretary of Transportation from granting authority to Mexican trucking companies.

Supporting Evidence: Boyda wants stronger regulations for Mexican truckers (boyda.house.gov)
Side: Nancy Boyda
2 points

Rep. Nancy Boyda (D), a member of the House Armed Services Committee, recently met with U.S. commanders in Afghanistan and this past Tuesday stated that there is a clear need for more troops to be sent to the region in order to combat the resurgence of the Taliban and terrorist activity.

The additional troops, she clarified, should be composed of two to five brigades of U.S. troops combined with NATO and Afghan units.

"“For the past two years, we have heard that we need more troops and resources. It's a fine line. We don’t want to look like occupiers. But to do a job, we need to have more troops on the ground.”

Boyda's statement is an interesting one as it seems that Democratic candidates have been waving the banner of withdrawing our troops from the Middle East for so long. And, while many Republicans are criticizing her for feigning a "tough on national security" stance here only when it's politically convenient after statistics are touting the success of the troop surge in Iraq, the fact that she's called for increased effort in Afghanistan (which has seen a significant increase in terrorist activity) is laden with more nuance than mere partisan politics it would seem and is deserving of a more concerted consideration when balancing the two candidates for Kansas' 2nd District.

Supporting Evidence: Afghanistan Surge (cjonline.com)
Side: Afghanistan Surge
2 points

Boyda Votes Against Bailout

Boyda explains that she voted no to the bill because the economists that she consulted all thought that this was a bad bill and because there was the possibility that all of this money would not be returned. She argues that any elected officials plan to improve the economy would be compromised by the lack of funds. After the bill she stated,

“I have spoken to so many economists in this past week, four of them personally. And every time I ask the question, 'Do you think this will work?’ They look away. They actually break eye contact with you and come back and say they’re not sure. I’m not asking for a guarantee, only 'Do you think it will work?’ And not one will say they even think that this will work. What every economist agrees on is there are several other options that have a higher probability of success, at less risk to the taxpayer.

“The only problem is that if we spent $700 billion on this option and it doesn’t work, then we don’t have that money to spend on doing what really needs to be done to strengthen our economy for the short and the long term."

Supporting Evidence: No Bailout (boyda.house.gov)
Side: Bailout
2 points

Jenkins Aims for the Gun Vote

Since the values vote appeared so influential in the 2004 elections – particularly in the Midwest – a candidate’s position on guns could be informative for voters. Like her Democratic rival, Nancy Boyda, Jenkins supports the Second Amendment. She heralds the Supreme Court’s decision ruling against the Washington D.C. gun ban. However, it is unclear whether guns will play a pivotal role in these elections.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.lynnjenkins.com)
Side: Guns
2 points

Jenkins Offers an Energy Plan that Continues Bush’s Policy

Despite Jenkins’s criticism of America’s dependence on foreign oil, she is completely content with a dependence on domestic oil. Jenkins advocates drilling in ANWR and offshore. She also calls for an expansion in domestic oil production. Rather than investing in alternative energy resources more whole-heartedly, Jenkins continues with an energy policy that is bound for exhaustion and will do little to affect prices today.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.lynnjenkins.com)
Side: Energy
2 points

Jenkins Supports McCain’s Nuclear Energy Policy

Jenkins supports the controversial option of nuclear energy. Although the nuclear option has tremendous benefits in terms of efficiency and low emissions, national security may be even worse off if this route is taken. Just as America castigates Iran for building a nuclear power plant in order to cover up nuclear weapons, other countries could do the same to us.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.lynnjenkins.com)
Side: Energy
2 points

Jenkins: A Traditional Economic Republican

True to Jenkins’s party, cutting taxes and government spending are at the core of the candidate’s economic policy. She submits, “The American economy works best when Americans are allowed to keep more of their money to spend or save as they please instead of giving it to Washington, D.C. bureaucrats.” Jenkins pledges to make the Bush tax cuts permanent, end the Alternative Minimum Tax, and abolish the death tax. The candidate puts a Kansas spin on death taxes and states that the taxes affect farmers who want to pass their farms onto their children.

In her criticism of spending, Jenkins attacks so-called pork-barrel projects. However, she is silent on social welfare programs.

Supporting Evidence: On the Issues (www.lynnjenkins.com)
Side: Economy
2 points

Like most of her fellow Obama supporters, Congresswoman Boyda has lacked assertiveness in overturning FISA and ending the war in Iraq as soon as possible. Jenkins seems to be only a slightly better choice in that she shows an awareness of our national debt brought on by wasteful spending. She could convince more voters that she is not a neocon if she would favor getting rid of the DHS as a response to her own admission that it is bureaucracy rather than just saying it needs to be more efficient.

Side:
Lynn Jenkins (R)
1 point

Incumbent Nancy Boyda’s decision to turn down $1.2 million in funding from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee could help mitigate the fundraising deficit challenger Lynn Jenkins faces after her contentious primary fight.

While the latest filings from July 16 show Boyda with a fundraising edge over Jenkins, the NRCC is pouring dollars and support into the 2nd District in an effort to win back this seat. Already, Boyda is one of only three incumbent Democrats the NRCC has targeted with early media buys.

Without the backing of the DCCC, Boyda could face an uphill battle in a district she won by 51 to 47 percent in 2006.

Supporting Evidence: http://blogs.cjonline.com/index.php?entry=7795 (www.rollcall.com)
Side: Fundraising
1 point

Jenkins: A Farmer’s Influence on Several Issues

Since Jenkins grew up on her family dairy farm, her personal history may appeal to Kansas’s farm vote. Her upbringing bears out in her economic and health care policy. She argues that children should be able to inherit all of their parents land without the government taking out taxes. Jenkins emphasizes the geographic placement of health care centers and proposes that they be close to rural areas in order to support farmers. Though her exact policy prescriptions may be vague, Jenkins might receive quite a few votes on her roots alone.

Supporting Evidence: Character and Issues (www.lynnjenkins.com)
Side: Character
1 point

No matter how much I try, I can't picture this as "moving" me. Cartoons in themselves are often light and humorous, and the jaunty, informal attitude associated with fist bumping doesn't quite help.

Perhaps a painting of Obama looking up at Lincoln's statue would have moved me more.

Supporting Evidence: testking 70-350 (www.real-testking.com)
Side: Lynn Jenkins