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Reward Points:704
Efficiency: Efficiency is a measure of the effectiveness of your arguments. It is the number of up votes divided by the total number of votes you have (percentage of votes that are positive).

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Arguments:645
Debates:7
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10 most recent arguments.
1 point

Crying just gives me the opportunity to further indulge in my misery, and make myself feel worse.

The best way to make myself feel better is to find a distraction, like reading a book, to calm myself down.

1 point

So you're saying that a lot of people are unsuited to, or dislike, manual labour. Ok, but clearly not everyone, because a lot of people are employed in manual labour jobs, and the work does get done because we have our roads and houses and all. And then there are plenty of jobs that don't involve manual labour.

Again, I ask this question: would the world still be running if, as you say, people didn't work anymore? You'd think that at least some people are working, some of the time, and they are at least working enough that we as a civilisation aren't starving and huddling cold on the streets.

1 point

Yeah, like I said, crime expanded onto a new platform with computers. But crime will appear anywhere where there are people; it's inevitable. It's not reasonable to denounce something just because it is susceptible to crime. Should we say that cars are bad because people can crash? That shops are bad because they can get robbed? That fences are bad because they can get graffitied on?

And I do agree with you in saying that people are more easily distracted by the computer than by most other activities. But what about the advantages of computers - don't they far outweigh the disadvantages? I already addressed this point in another post, so I'll just quote it here:

Computers have made it easy to store huge archives of data, and to make this data available to anyone else with a computer. It's possible for entire libraries' worth of information to be accessible by billions of people at a fraction of its previous cost. Communication and collaboration over vast distances is effortless. Planning, writing, drawing, or simulation is much easier on a computer than on traditional media, because it can calculate, replicate, or undo actions so much faster than a human can. All this means that education and research is faster, easier, cheaper, and available to more people - which in turn means much, much faster societal and technological progress.

The downside to all this is, basically, just that people have to keep their priorities in place (like knowing when they should be studying rather than checking Facebook), and have to take precautions against cybercrime. These concerns are important, of course, but do they get anywhere near outweighing the benefits of relying on computers?

2 points

Please, instead of trying to sound smart-ass, actually answer my question. I called to question your claim that people today don't work at all, which I find utterly absurd.

Also, note that I agreed that it's possible that people nowadays don't work as hard as people did in the past. You don't need to raise examples of how hard people used to work; I haven't even been disputing that point. What I did dispute is whether or not it's a bad thing for people to work less.

And I'm not sure what performing daily tasks to sustain life, like building fires and tilling fields, has to do with ambition. That's basic survival. Ambition is when you strive for more than the basics, like getting more educated, or getting wealthier, or getting more influential... or coming up with the scientific and technological breakthroughs that are the hallmark of the modern times.

1 point

Well, in your other post you said that just because a doctor diagnosed autism, it doesn't mean they have it. I took that to mean that you believe autism is a genuine disorder, but that it is sometimes diagnosed on people who don't have this disorder.

If your argument is that autism isn't actually a disorder, I'll go about replying in a different way.

It's true that many of the symptoms of autism are similar to what you see in neglected or abused children, but that doesn't mean they have the same cause. According to this site, genetics appears to be important. That's hardly attributable to bad parenting:

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Autism is a physical condition linked to abnormal biology and chemistry in the brain. The exact causes of these abnormalities remain unknown, but this is a very active area of research. There are probably a combination of factors that lead to autism.

Genetic factors seem to be important. For example, identical twins are much more likely than fraternal twins or siblings to both have autism. Similarly, language abnormalities are more common in relatives of autistic children. Chromosomal abnormalities and other nervous system (neurological) problems are also more common in families with autism.

A number of other possible causes have been suspected, but not proven. They involve:

- Diet

- Digestive tract changes

- Mercury poisoning

- The body's inability to properly use vitamins and minerals

- Vaccine sensitivity

(from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002494/) )

1 point

Just because the disorder is sometimes wrongly diagnosed on healthy people, that doesn't mean the disorder itself is an excuse. All it means is that doctors should try to be more careful with their diagnosis, and healthy people shouldn't hide under the label of a disorder they don't have.

3 points

I don't see how making a healthy person blind will benefit the victim, the offender, or anybody at all. Retributive justice serves no purpose other than to satisfy and encourage hatred.

2 points

And common sense? Do you really think society wouldn't have crumbled to pieces and humanity gone extinct by now if nobody worked or had ambition nowadays, as you said?

People work less now than they used to, possibly; people have less ambition now than they used to, possibly. (Personally I don't see the former as necessarily a bad thing, and the latter I find highly suspect.) But to say that work and ambition are gone is such a gross exaggeration that I can't take it seriously.

3 points

It can be a valuable tool if used well. It has its dangers, but that's what parents are for - to explain to them what the dangers are and how to avoid them. The internet is one of the safest places for kids to experiment independence in, provided they understand a few very obvious rules and the reasoning behind them.

1 point

Everything you've said is true, but it's only one part of the story.

Computers have made it easy to store huge archives of data, and to make this data available to anyone else with a computer. It's possible for entire libraries' worth of information to be accessible by billions of people at a fraction of its previous cost. Communication and collaboration over vast distances is effortless. Planning, writing, drawing, or simulation is much easier on a computer than on traditional media, because it can calculate, replicate, or undo actions so much faster than a human can. All this means that education and research is faster, easier, cheaper, and available to more people - which in turn means much, much faster societal and technological progress.

The downside to all this is, basically, just that people have to keep their priorities in place (like knowing when they should be studying rather than checking Facebook), and have to take precautions against cybercrime. These concerns are important, of course, but do they get anywhere near outweighing the benefits of relying on computers?

Displaying 7 most recent debates.

Tied Positions: Some forms are acceptable vs. All of it is unacceptable
Winning Position: WTF that's ridiculous
Winning Position: No
Winning Position: How would you reform the education system?
Winning Position: There is nothing wrong with it

About Me


I am probably a good person but I haven't taken the time to fill out my profile, so you'll never know!


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