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Kitk34(185) pic



Do you have a moral obligation to do something that your own judgment tells you

It seems like many people on the planet will do things that they know are wrong but, they are told that they have an obligation to do them.  This is something that is not a comfortable thing to think about because it involves a guilty conscience.  Sometimes a person will look at what they have done and supported in their life, realizing that they have been/done wrong.  This is why the Truth can hurt so much, yet, if they decide to change this then, their life might turn around for the better.  There is an old quote from one Edmund Burke that is perhaps familiar, paraphrased: "The only way for evil to triumph, is for good men to do nothing."

While that qoute is true many decent people may not realize that they are involved in evil acts themselves.  An experiment from the 1960's showed that people tend to blindly obey 'authority'; it was called the Stanley Milgram experiment, which, you can find actual footage of on Youtube.  I believe it was something like 60-80% of participants continued to do what they were told, even though things were not as they seemed at the begining.

So what is your answer to the question: Do you have a moral obligation to do what your own judgment tells you is wrong or bad?

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2 points

Do you have a moral obligation to do what your own judgment tells you is wrong or bad?

Your own judgment is informed by your upbringing and society, one can carry out actions I would totally abhor yet they would be grossly offended that I found them such. An example today being Friday is the day where punishments take place in the ghastly “chop chop square in Saudi Arabia , people have hands amputated, lashings take place and beheadings for those who break Sharia law , where we live to decapitate an apostrophe would lead to mostly international condemnation but is perfectly acceptable there

You can only do what you do based on your own subjective moral code and from your perspective you may think yourself a paragon of virtue yet others may deem you a beast

1 point

Morals are subjective. If it is against your moral code, then you have no moral obligation to do it.

1 point

Your headline asks Do you have a moral obligation to do something that your own judgment tells you is wrong? The correct answer is NO.

You said in your explanation:

it seems like many people on the planet will do things that they know are wrong but, they are told that they have an obligation to do them.

YES many people violate their own morals in exchange for something they want or need.

Example: You are a married father of six.

You are instructed by your employer to falsify a report. You comply in order to keep your job.

In this example you have complied with your implied agreement to follow your employers instructions. You have betrayed your moral belief in honesty in order to satisfy your moral obligation to provide for your dependents. The root of your question may be "Can someone be in a situation in which their morals a brought into conflict" ----YES

1 point

You can believe you are right, but it doesn't make you right. If morality obliges you to do something, that is independent of what your judgement tells you about the matter. Hopefully your judgement is not independent of moral obligation, but it can be.

1 point

I said ..... to decapitate an apostrophe 🤣🤣🤣

Bloody predictive text, I meant as I’m sure you know apostate

1 point

Wow, I did this debate, like six years ago. Thanks to all for bringing it back. The experiment I spoke of needs to be clarified, I think, because There were some good answers, from different perspectives. But I reread the description of the debate and the question is not in line with the description, very well. Those who answered might be familiar with the experiment. However, as I said, it is not very clear.

Okay, so a break down of the experiment goes like this: A participant was told to zap another one, in a different room, while they were answering questions. They were told that it was being researched on how punishment effects a persons answers on a test, quiz, etc. How well do people do under pressure on a test, if I remember correctly. Now, the person being zapped was hooked up to an electric meter, that was to increase as the answers were answered incorrectly.

As I pointed out in the description, there were about 60-80% who continuously administered those shocks, regardless of the person in the other room saying no more. The person in the lab coat would tell questioners that the experiment must continue. And they did it. Soon enough there was no sound coming from the other room.

There were some who discontinued doing it, either right away or as soon as the person said no more. They also, checked to see who would follow others when they discontinued. There were some who followed that one, who was an actor, as was the person in the other room. The real experiment was to see how far people would obey authority, even against there own judgement and moral code.

So, maybe the better question should have been "what would you have done in such a situation?" And I think it answers my original question, which is kind of an obvious answer, but unfortunately, many obey anyways.

Jody(1748) Disputed
2 points

" And I think it answers my original question, which is kind of an obvious answer, but unfortunately, many obey anyways.

I’m afraid you’re drawing false conclusions from Milgrams experiments , when the participants were asked afterwards how they felt the majority claimed they felt just fine , the reason they felt this way was because they were told by Milgram before the testing they were doing a great service to the world of science which is why they felt fine

This is the problem with these type of tests we only get to hear the results and never how the participants are treated before in this case they were all primed and the results from the tests absolutely worthless

Kitk34(185) Disputed
1 point

I’m afraid you’re drawing false conclusions from Milgrams experiments , when the participants were asked afterwards how they felt the majority claimed they felt just fine , the reason they felt this way was because they were told by Milgram before the testing they were doing a great service to the world of science which is why they felt fine

Not false at all. Actually, the fact that they "felt fine" due to being in "service to science" shows that they were trying to "be a good servant to science" while doing the experiment, but it was in contradiction to what they should have done, which was to stop doing it, from the get-go.

This is the problem with these type of tests we only get to hear the results and never how the participants are treated before in this case they were all primed and the results from the tests absolutely worthless

Unless they were told about the actual experiment, the results are not worthless. In fact, Milgram being the "authority" along with the ones wearing lab coats, conducting the experiment, telling them what he did, showed that they "felt fine" because "authority" absolved them of any wrongdoing. This shows the blind obedience to authority.

This reflects the world, today, in the form of police, military, and any others who are "authorized" to do what the rest of us have no right to do. It is a flat out lie. That authorization means nothing, but so many people today will go against their own Principles and moral code or compass, for, one example, a paycheck. And some for power and control of others.

1 point

I don't know. It sounds complicated. My judgement is a bit hit and miss, so I would definitely consult with a friend first.

If his judgement and mine is the same, I would be extra sceptical. Don't trust any of my friends.

As in obligation, you mean have to do something? I don't handle pressure very well. Sorry, never have. I have my own problems, ok? It also depends if I could get away with looking a way or being called out. Hope I don't have to experience a situation like this. It would be awful to get the blame, you know?