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Debate Info

10
34
No. Yes.
Debate Score:44
Arguments:26
Total Votes:57
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Argument Ratio

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 No. (10)
 
 Yes. (15)

Debate Creator

Sitar(3682) pic



Does the proabortion activists respect the unborn child's right to choose?

No.

Side Score: 10
VS.

Yes.

Side Score: 34

Does a person defending their home respect the burglar's right to life?

Side: No.
4 points

Well, once the child is born and has conscious to choose then the prochoicers generally advocate the child's right to choose in situations that are age appropriate. When it is the womb and is not conscious at all, they cannot choose anything,

Side: Yes.
HarvardGrad(174) Disputed
1 point

Explain exactly how a newborn can choose to not die consciously? What is the fundamental difference between instinctual choice and conscious choice in the context that you offer?

Side: No.
Atrag(5550) Disputed
1 point

Right a newborn can't choose either.

Side: Yes.
Sitar(3682) Clarified
0 points

I feel like life begins at conception. :) .

Side: No.
1 point

Choice starts at birth.

Side: Yes.
3 points

Logical fallacy. A fetus is not capable of making a decision. It can't think. My body my rights my choice. You need to respect womens right to choose.

Side: Yes.
The_Man(14) Disputed
1 point

We all know what a fetus turns in to when it's allowed to develop. You might think it's selfish to force a pregnant woman to carry such a "burden" for 9 months, but I think it's even more selfish for a woman to make several poor decisions that result in a pregnancy and then demand that they be allowed to take a life to spare them the inconvenience of birthing and raising a child.

The only positive I see in abortions is that they prevent morally decrepit women from reproducing. The kind of people who support abortions should not be trusted to raise children.

Side: No.
1 point

The "burden" of birthing and raising a child is, I think, a bit more intense than you're giving it credit. The short-term and long-term physical, emotional, and economic strife caused by nine months of pregnancy, giving birth, raising a child, or even giving a child up for adoption can be life altering, and sometimes deadly. It can be more than just an "inconvenience," as you put it, but can cause depression, poverty, physical and mental disabilities, HUGE disruption in life, etc. etc. etc.

Also, do you mean to say that if a women is pregnant, she is solely responsible? What if she was raped? And even if she wasn't, last time I checked, it takes more than one person to make a baby.

Do you know who rarely argues on your side? Females. Find me a women who will claim that unwanted pregnancy is always the fault of the female. Or that birthing and raising a child can never be anything worse than an "inconvenience."

Side: Yes.
Sitar(3682) Disputed
0 points

Fallacy fallacy. Disagreement does not equal a fallacy. The unborn child is a person with rights and the baby has brainwaves starting at 8 weeks old.

Side: No.
1 point

Regular EEG doesn't start into 25 weeks. Even then it is incapable of choosing. Particularly as it isn't even self aware.

Side: Yes.
Cuaroc(8839) Banned
3 points

you don't like it when people "copy" your debates and yet here you are doing the same thing.

Side: Yes.

If you had ever had an abortion, you would know that the unborn child's freedom of choice is respected. Prior to the procedure, one of the nurses performs an ultrasound. This is done to locate and monitor the fetus. The nurse gets her face as close as possible and asks the fetus to perform some kind of action to opt out of the procedure- the specific action tends to vary from clinic to clinic and from nurse to nurse. If the fetus opts out, the procedure is aborted and the patient sent home. To date, only three fetuses total have opted out, and many in the scientific community believe these to be flukes.

Side: Yes.

You are a stupid woman for not realizing a fetus cannot choose. Stop making debates which are the exact opposite of what somebody else has said as it often makes no sense.

Side: Yes.