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Debate Info

20
19
yes no
Debate Score:39
Arguments:32
Total Votes:61
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 yes (14)
 
 no (14)

Debate Creator

feelingtruth(2774) pic



Dreams are a valid reality

The proof of this doesnt need credible sources because the information is widely known, just not really accepted.

Anyways: Quantum physics says that reality is created by "snapping" it into observation.

therefore, if you can consciously enter your dream, you are "snapping" it into observation, thus giving a logical valid reality 

yes

Side Score: 20
VS.

no

Side Score: 19

this side is nice and quiet.....

Side: yes
1 point

Although I can't say I agree with the question based on your understanding of Quantum Theory, I do agree with it in regard to Philosophy. What is reality? Well, this is my definition; Reality is the realm of existence in which one operates. What makes this physical world we live in reality? Because it's there and can be operated in and interacted with. We don't even know how or why the universe is in existence, so this could be some sort of experiment done by another life form. On what basis can one discredit another realm of operation as a reality? We all have a slightly different understanding of pretty much everything we experience. This is a result of personality differences and genetic predispositions, but nonetheless everyone sees everything in a different manner. Now how could somebody say that the way I see things is less real than the way you see them. You can't. I guess what I'm trying to say is this; Every thing in the universe that is plausible is just that, plausible. Nothing is proven indefinitely, because even science will tell you that it's all just theory. Different ways of looking at the same picture. Dreams are a valid reality, because you can interact with it and experience it. You aren't usually high, but when you are is it not real?

Side: yes
dalodus(31) Clarified
1 point

Definition of Consciousness

One common dictionary definition of consciousness is "the ability to be aware of and to be able to perceive the relationship between oneself and one's environment". The most basic definition, however, is simply "awareness". Another definition suitable for more complex organizations of matter such as animals with a brain includes a description which contains some of the following ideas: "thoughts, sensations, perceptions, moods, emotions, dreams, and awareness of self". Just like life itself, consciousness is one of those things that is easy to recognize but very difficult to define. It has been debated by philosophers in the West since the time of ancient Greek civilization over twenty five hundred years ago.

Eastern traditions have been wrestling with the concept of consciousness for Milena and seem to have a much better handle on it although still not nearly complete. In the West, explanations of consciousness have been mostly ignored or left to our religious traditions. This is certainly true since the time of Descartes and the philosophy of Cartesian duality. It has only been in very recent times that a serious effort to understand mind or consciousness has been undertaken by the scientific community. Much of the effort now underway is based on the assumption of epiphenomenalism, that consciousness, or mind if you prefer, is a byproduct of the functioning of underlying physical structures of the brain and that mind is confined entirely within the brain’s processes. However, there is a considerable amount of accumulating experimental and anecdotal evidence suggesting that this interpretation is not correct (Chalmers 1996; Penrose 1994).

At a basic level consciousness seems to be associated with a sense of separation and awareness of the surrounding environment from the conscious entity. It also seems to be associated with the ability to process, store and / or act on information gathered from that external environment. But is consciousness restricted to a functioning brain? Are microscopic organisms such as viruses, amoeba, and algae conscious in some primitive sense? Clearly they do not have brains let alone a nervous system or even neurons. And yet they demonstrate purposeful behavior and are aware of their environment. Amoeba, for example, search for food by moving on pseudo pods toward prey that they eventually surround, engulf and digest. Several types of algae are so versatile that they change the process how they obtain food based on available sunlight. When light is plentiful, they gravitate towards it, which they sense through a photoreceptor at one end of the cell. If the light is too bright, they will swim away toward more suitable lighting conditions.

At a more primitive level viruses are considered by many scientists as non-living because they do not meet all the criteria commonly used in the definition of life. They do, however exhibit some aspects of consciousness or at least some rudimentary form of an awareness of their surroundings. Unlike most organisms, viruses are not made of complete cells. They reproduce by invading and taking over the machinery of their target host cell. When a virus comes into contact with a potential host, it inserts itself into the genetic material of the host’s cell. The infected cell is then instructed to produce more viral protein and genetic material instead of performing its normal functions. Is that purposeful behavior or intentionality by the invading virus?

It would seem that based on our first definition, even simple living entities are conscious to some degree, since they display a level of awareness and intentionality to, in some way, manipulate their environment. And, it’s not just restricted to living entities. We find certain properties all the way down to the subatomic level, particles in some sense aware of their environment. How is this possible? At the molecular, atomic and subatomic levels it is through the quantum phenomenon of entanglement and non-locality that particles act and react to other particles with which they have become entangled.

Side: yes

I GUESS SO

Side: yes
1 point

Dreams are successions of images, ideas, emotions, and sensations that occur involuntarily in the mind during certain stages of sleep.Scientists believe that, in addition to humans, certain birds ..........http://ogibogi.com/node/1633 for details.

Side: yes
Side: yes
5 points

I don't like the way you treat quantum physics. Quantum physics doesn't state that you "snap" something into reality by observation. It states that the properties of a particle or collection there of are uncertain until observed. Refer to Schrodinger's Cat. You can't know whether the cat is alive or dead until you open the box, and thus while the box is shut, it is simultaneously both.

Another thing about this question is what do we mean by "valid reality"? Is something subjective to you a valid reality? Or must something be objectively binding to be a valid reality? Given the difficulty of proving true objectivity, then there is a very plausible case for asserting the former.

Side: no
dkforizzle(175) Clarified
1 point

Haha I enjoy the fact that our arguments are pretty much the same thing. You say no, because "Why would it be?" And I say yes, because "Why wouldn't it be?"

Side: yes
ChuckHades(3197) Clarified
1 point

I think it just stems from what we both class as reality. Is reality subjective or objective? Well, that's a subjective question, but it's in an objective universe, which could be subjective but we can't objectively know so we assume objectivity without objective or subjective evidence, and aargh my head ;)

It's an interesting topic, one which can see two people with the same arguments have different conclusions, which is what makes it fun I suppose.

Side: yes
2 points

I practice lucid dreaming, which is controlling your dream, sometimes I use it to find solutions to problems, others I just grow wings and fly (flying is amazing), but this is not a reality to me- it's just my subconcious. It's just part of this reality.

Side: no
TheBogle88(115) Disputed
1 point

"this is not a reality to me- it's just my subconcious. It's just part of this reality."

I like that; it seems analogous to many supernatural events. They're perceived in this reality, and are therefore a part of them, but that doesn't mean they're 'real' in any physical, temporal, or energetic sense.

Side: no

The question of whether something is real or not can be answered by this "If no one is around to observe it, does it still exist". That being said, my answer is no.

Side: no

Whats with the points are you gunna trade them for some skittles,that can be lethal in some places,what the fuck you took nothing from me and i want it back,must have missed the boat when they preached the importance of points,a good laugh is worth how many points, i can buy the whole skittle factory

Side: no
1 point

The proof of this doesnt need credible sources because the information is widely known, just not really accepted.

I rest my case.

Side: no

I would love to step into one of my dreams but I know that it will never be possible to do so.

Side: no
-4 points
1 point

are you serious

Side: yes
1 point

Man he gave me a good a laugh

Side: yes
RandomDude(1286) Disputed
-2 points
0 points

you must be being sarcastic, here ill give you your point back if you give me mine back

Side: yes