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Debate Info

28
31
No it wouldn't Yes it would
Debate Score:59
Arguments:58
Total Votes:61
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Argument Ratio

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 No it wouldn't (27)
 
 Yes it would (28)

Debate Creator

souloflight(411) pic



Human Cloning would be ethical

No it wouldn't

Side Score: 28
VS.

Yes it would

Side Score: 31
2 points

There are ethical issues surrounding the idea of cloning, and in general, they are all hypothetical. Meaning, if we were to clone a human being right now, we don't know what the ethical ramifications would be. And they have the potential to be tremendous. (Though if the ethical issues were absent, then it would be an extraordinarily good idea)

This is because the reasons for cloning, while noble in intention, may forget one aspect of the cloning process: the clone. Do clones have feelings? In science-fiction books surrounding the ideas for cloning, it's generally regarded as a sign of societal panic. One example many people would know would be Star Wars. Did you ever wonder about the ethical issues of cloning from the prequel trilogy? It's not even a sub-theme, but in books about that era of Star Wars, it's a main issue.

Because, clones in that scenario are people. But because they were clones, they were essentially all slaves. They did not have the rights of people, and they were not treated as normal people were.

This is where the ethical dilemma of cloning becomes prevalent.

What if clones have genuine consciousnesses, emotions, opinions, and therefore, souls?

If they do, the original scientific purposes of cloning become completely unethical. If we clone so we can have a test subject for developing medicines, that's unacceptable, because the clone is a human being. If we clone to have an organ farm, that's unacceptable, because the clone is a human being. If we clone to have 'immortality', that is just plain stupid, because the clone may as well end up a completely different person then the original, as there is no evidence to support the idea they would have all the memories and personality of the original.

Inevitably, therefore, cloning has the potential to be extremely unethical, because if we create a genuine human being, the only purpose it would serve and still be ethical would be to increase the population, since experimentation upon human beings is unethical.

And the problem with that, is that we have MUCH easier ways to increase the population.

Side: No it wouldn't
Jace(5220) Clarified
1 point

I think your argument is less that cloning is unethical, and more that the intentions behind the cloning and the treatment of the clones could be unethical. Yes?

Side: No it wouldn't
1 point

Operating under the presumption that the question is referring to the cloning of full, functional human beings I would have to say that I cannot think of any reason why such cloning would be actually beneficial. Certainly, growing human organs independent of a full human entity could have its benefits but I am hard pressed to think of any unique benefits to cloning an entire human. There seems to be nothing that could be accomplished by cloning a human being which could not be otherwise accomplished through means which are less problematic and less expensive (time, money, and resources). As I adhere to a system of ethics premised largely upon utility I find the inefficiency objectionable.

Side: No it wouldn't
1 point

In my point of view human cloning will help for a lot of people who will need donating organs. I mean if there is a problems and causes to change the organ which is vital, cloning will save your life.

Side: Yes it would

This is true... good point. It may cause a decline in thr death rate, so yea it could be ethical.

Side: Yes it would
1 point

Unless your mean the cloning of exclusively organs, then that is extremely unethical, your creating a human then ripping their guts out.

Side: No it wouldn't
aikaT(14) Disputed
1 point

But you must not forget about people who can not exist with out this organs. May be it is someones mother. It will be more unethical to let the people die .

Side: Yes it would
1 point

Out of curiosity, if cloning an entire body was required to get properly grown organs(it isn't) would removing the part of the genome that enables the brain to function(eliminating sentience completely) before the body begins development, would it still be unethical?

Side: Yes it would

Depends on what the goal is. I think we should be able to clone humans so long as the goal is to allow the human to live a normal free life like any other human.

One potential benefit for cloning humans, we could clone several geniuses we have today, assuming these geniuses consented to it. The world can always use more smart people.

One problem with cloning though is it's not 100% successful. Complications have arisen from cloning animals in the past. If we are going to clone humans, these complications must be overcome to ensure there is a practically zero chance of any complications during the clones lifetime or development.

I see that some people seem to think we might clone humans merely to harvest their organs. This is ridiculous. There is already work being done that would allow us to clone specifically individual organs for transplants in sick patients.

Side: Yes it would
Jace(5220) Clarified
1 point

Human genetics are far more complicated than you make them out to be. You cannot simply take the genetic composition of a "genius" to clone that individual and expect that the result will be another genius. A genetic predisposition does have to exist, but a complex system of genetic triggers within human DNA must be activated through lived experience and opportunity to produce the same person. Without the capacity to reproduce the lived experience of the genius you would not necessarily end up with a genius clone. You could perhaps increase the likelihood, but there would be no guarantee. It seems a more efficient and dependable practice to increase the educational opportunities and social stability of more people to enable an overall growth in human intelligence and human capital, rather than relying upon the addition of a few maybe-geniuses.

Side: No it wouldn't
1 point

I don't think I'm simplifying it. I'm talking about child prodigy geniuses. People who graduate high school at the age of 8 and graduate college at the age of 14. People who are hard wired to advance their minds at lightning speeds.

Side: Yes it would

Human Cloning will find a cure for disease and possibly new arms and legs can be grown for amputees.

Side: Yes it would