CreateDebate


Debate Info

78
80
Yes No
Debate Score:158
Arguments:111
Total Votes:169
More Stats

Argument Ratio

side graph
 
 Yes (48)
 
 No (57)

Debate Creator

TheEccentric(3382) pic



Is Christian philosophy worthy of any credit?

Lots of people who disbelieve in the religion itself still value its philosophical teachings. Whether you believe in its God or not what do you think of its philosophy?

Yes

Side Score: 78
VS.

No

Side Score: 80
5 points

Negative things have been done in the name of Christianity, but these actions cannot be associated with the founder of the religion. It's like blaming Steve Jobs for what people do with their iPods. The religion itself is an overwhelming force in contribution to the positive in third world countries from things like helping fight hunger, to hospitals, schools, etc,... and this can all be linked directly to the founder of the religion. As for the philosophical side being of credit - it's really a matter of values. You have to listen to what the more modern philosophers of religion have said about Christianity, namely people like William James, Soren Kierkegaard, Hans Kung, Huston Smith.

Side: Yes
3 points

I was struggling to find something to give them credit for. This is a good example. Christians do deserve credit for helping third world countries.

Side: Yes
1 point

This debate is not about the effect that Christianity has when people put into in practice it is about the philosophical teaching. Clearly gouging your eye out so you do not feel lust, for example, is a stupid philosophical belief.

Side: No
14giraffes(87) Disputed
2 points

How else would you argue a philosophy was worthy of credit except for its outcomes? Gouging your eye out is only stupid if you take it literally. The verse is just a poetic way of expressing the seriousness of the problem of Lust within the context of spiritual life. I can find similar verses in the Dhammapada.

Side: Yes
Cartman(18192) Disputed
2 points

Just because there is one stupid philosophical component doesn't mean they don't deserve any credit. The philosophy of Christianity says to convert as many people as possible and help your fellow man which leads to helping people in Africa.

Side: Yes

I agree with it's philosophy. I like it. Now giving it credit depends on where you wish to place that credit. In the science community? No. In the realm of philosophy or a school or thought? Absolutely.

Side: Yes
2 points

Yes because it teaches that Yeshua died on the cross for our sins so that we may live forever if we are sorry for our sins and accept Him as our God.

Side: Yes
2 points

That has nothing to do with the philosophy of Christianity. What is your opinion on Christian philosophy?

Side: No
Sitar(3682) Disputed
3 points

Yes it does. I gave a valid reason as to why people should be Christian.

Side: Yes
2 points

The death and resurrection of Jesus is not a philosophical belief. An example of Christian philosophy is the values that he actually taught.

Side: No
2 points

Western law is based on Christian belief, So we have that. The American DOI and Constitution were based on Christian beliefs.

Side: Yes
0 points

Western law is based on Christian belief

What do you base this on? Particularly considering how the Western world derived its legal structure from that of Rome, which had its legal structure since before the birth of christ, and the fact that Christian beliefs pertaining to ethic (aka law) date back to the Code of Hammurabi, a per-Christian structure.

The American DOI and Constitution were based on Christian beliefs.

No, they were based on post-Enlightenment liberalism (referring to the political science term, not modern American liberalism), which ran counter to traditional Christian thought at the time of inception.

Revisionist history is just silly.

Side: No
Astac(242) Disputed
2 points

History Western law is based on old English common law, which comes from Christianity.

You are incorrect on your posting about the DOI, while correct it was based on what is now known as classical liberalism, it did not run counter to Christianity and morality . In fact the founders mentioned that the Constitution was written for a moral and religious people.

Side: Yes
1 point

I think that, even if you don't believe in God, or in "a god", Christian philosophy (the core of it, mainly referring to Catholicism here) is the foundation to living a good life. Never have I ever heard anyone take a quote (in context) from the Bible and say, "this is wrong" or "Jesus is evil" because it's simply not true. Even if you're an atheist and don't believe in these kinds of things, just buy looking at the core of Christianity, the ten commandments, if you can point out anything that is evil or isn't parallel to your moral code, then I dare say that you are a sick person.

Side: Yes
2 points

Never have I ever heard anyone take a quote (in context) from the Bible and say, "this is wrong" or "Jesus is evil" because it's simply not true.

I truly believe Jesus' message is quite evil. He says that regardless of if one leads a good and just life, if one does not believe he is the son of God, then said person will be tortured for eternity in hell. Christianity itself holds that to be one of the fundamental tenants: Worship, or burn. That, to me, is incredibly evil.

Side: No
Shrektastic(32) Disputed
1 point

Well, if you don't believe in a hell, then that shouldn't apply to you. But Jesus is telling us that if you do believe, and live justly, then you will be rewarded. It's a choice whether or not to believe, thus, it's a choice whether or not to burn.

Side: Yes
1 point

The question fails. It reveals your lack of perspective. Of course an If By Whiskey argument exists for religion. If you have to ask, the answer is no. IMO, what I got out of my cherry picked indoctrination is without measure.

Side: Yes
1 point

In ny life's journey, after exploring most everything for 40+years, it is the only system of thought that I find to be perfect in it's truest form.

Side: Yes
2 points

Care to say why? If you simply state your position, it's very hard to have a conversation/debate.

Side: No
stevetc(65) Clarified
1 point

I guess it's too sweeping of a subject. I can try to find some thread/statements which are about precise aspects of this, and address each particular aspect in a brief and debatable way. But this statement covers too much ground. Do you have a particular question about one aspect which you would like me to try to explain, without derailing the OP?

Side: Yes
GenericName(3430) Clarified
2 points

What constitutes its "truest form"? If it's orthodoxy, then modern Christianity is hardly the "truest form". If not orthodoxy, then what?

Side: Yes
stevetc(65) Clarified
1 point

Yes. Orthodox (small o) Christianity. Catholicism/Eastern Orthodox. It is the most detailed and complete system of thought I have encountered in all my years and all of my studies. I am convinced of the validity of the philosophy. At a minimum, it deserves a hearing in all public debate regarding, metaphysics, ethics, morals and even epistemology.

Side: Yes

Helping others is a beautiful philosophy of the Christian Religion.

Side: Yes

It encourages the bottling up and suppression of emotions. Not healthy. It portrays normal, healthy and unavoidable human emotions as being bad such as lust. Also the moral principles are worthy of no credit as they are just the generic ones every religion will have.

Side: No
VecVeltro(412) Disputed
6 points

Christianity, amongst others, encourages discipline - we must subjugate our desires to our intellectual control.

The problem with modern consumerist society is exactly that human beings have become slaves to their desires - if you want to eat, you eat; if you want to have sex, you have sex; if you want to drink, you drink etc. Problems like obesity, teenage pregnancies/pregnancies out of wedlock, spread of STD-s, alcoholism, greed, drug addictions are some of the clearer examples of what are are created by the endless pursuit of trying to satisfy every desire you have without any sort of restraint. Trying to control these desires is apparently perceived as prudish.

Lust, gluttony etc and all the vices that follow from them, such as obesity, tell us that without discipline, you only damage yourself.

Side: Yes
2 points

1. Teen pregnancy is going down.

2. Teen drug use is going down.

3. Obesity is being caused more and more by a lack of healthy food due to the prevalence of "Food deserts" in major population centers combined with the rising cost of living that isn't matched by wage increases.

4. Spread of STD's is down.

All while society becomes more secular (aka less Christian).

Don't you find that a little odd?

Side: No
Cartman(18192) Disputed
2 points

Christianity, amongst others, encourages discipline - we must subjugate our desires to our intellectual control.

No it doesn't. It teaches you that if you break the rules you just need to tell Jesus about it and move on. That is not discipline.

Side: No
1 point

There is nothing wrong with having sex when you want. There's something called a condom. You might have heard of it. Use it as any sensible person would and pregnancy and STDs are not a concern. As for alcohol there is nothing wrong with drinking it unless you're getting off your face all the time. You are really making a Christian life sound boring here. You can't link obesity to secularism as you get fat Christians.

Also Christian ways of disciplining yourself is gouging your eye out to prevent lust. How is that a good idea? Christianity just says to suppress these emotions not tackle them or try and pacify them through a proper method.

Side: No
14giraffes(87) Disputed
2 points

Suppression of emotion is a negative extreme, but also running sex with your head the way we in western society do is also considered unhealthy. Jesus was not all suppression. He told his followers to violate the sabbath (the law), made a whip and violently drove out the money changers, also he "partied" with "sinners", etc, . . . You know Rasputin? lol

Side: Yes
Philosophy1 Disputed
1 point

Emotions need to be controlled, especially when one isn't fully mature. Do you think every desire is good? No. We may desire to smoke because it feels good, not because we need it. Reason is very important. If emotions were the fundamental basis of our belief, then truth would be relative. Martyrs have reached high levels of self control, humbleness, and unselfishness to the point that they sacrifice their emotions for a reason, which is to belief in GOD. That is one reason why emotion is not the fundamental basis of Christianity since many people who are threatened would prefer to reject GOD and stay alive than die in his name. Jesus is the best possible example because he died for us, his love is so great that he gave his own life for all of us. Would you rather learn the hard way, doing what your emotions tell you and suffering from the hardships of life, or would you rather learn the easy way, with values and principles that can allow you to mature at a faster paste so that you won't fall for the mistakes you will regret later in life. If you regret following your own urges "smoking, alcohol, sex before marriage, teen pregnancy, not going to school etc...", then rethink what you just wrote. If you stand for it, then you are telling every smoker and drinker out there to go by their urges and not consider reasoning at all.

Side: Yes
1 point

Christianity has a inherent ability to contradict itself, which has made me lose all respect for the philosophy. Every good bit of christian philosophy pro's is so evenly matched with a con, that they completely cancel each other out.

Side: No
1 point

From the question alone, I thought this was a debate about the accomplishments of Christianity over the ages.

Based on the description, I would have to say no.

The secular philosophies in Christianity are not unique to it. It is just a combination of contemporary philosophies crammed together over the course of a millennium.

What unique secular Christian philosophy is still relevant to this day?

Side: No