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Debate Info

28
22
Agree Disagree
Debate Score:50
Arguments:45
Total Votes:52
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 Agree (19)
 
 Disagree (19)

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Harvard(666) pic



Makeup, by Definition, Implies Insecurity.



Those who wear makeup do so for aesthetically fruitful reasons (the exception being ceremonial or ritualistic). This implies that makeup wearers do not believe that their look conforms with their belief as to how good they should look. Hence, if you wear makeup, you do not believe that your look corresponds with your standards (as well as society's); thus implying lack of confidence; thus implying insecurity.

Agree

Side Score: 28
VS.

Disagree

Side Score: 22
1 point

Insecurity and deception.

Side: Agree
Delvis(221) Disputed
1 point

Put some makeup on girl. This female movement has become absurd.

I want my girls to look good. So enough with this nonsense.

Side: Disagree
Delvis(221) Disputed
0 points

I f you don't wear make up and nice , FEMALE clothes, you ain't going out with me.

Side: Disagree
1 point

What makes you think I want to go out with you?

Side: Disagree
instig8or(3308) Disputed
1 point

jolie is a man, nice move misogynist.

Side: Agree
1 point

Say that I agree: following that logic nearly everything could be insecurity.

Putting clothes on - if it's for no reason other than cover yourself (say at summer), it's no different.

Shaving - No point if it's not for hygiene

Growing a beard - you can do it to hide your face

Shaving the beard - society standards

As for me, I can count the times I wore makeup with the fingers of my hand. Last time was yesterday, I put one some BB cream, my face looks better and I did not want some pimples to appear on the photos. Maybe if I did not wear that I would have taken less photos at myself, idk.

I am not displeased of my appearance, that's true. Sure some girls (or boys) wear makeup for the reason that they are insecure, but I would not say that a person who wears make-up is insecure by the fact they are wearing make-up, like I would not call a person insecure for putting on a formal shirt instead of a simple T-shirt.

A photographer that edits it's photos after taking them, a writer that re-writes things all the time, I would not call them insecure of their works. You can think otherwise of course.

Side: Agree
3 points

Makeup may be used to deal with personal insecurities, but that is hardly its sole function. At its most basic, it is just the same as wearing clothes or getting your hair cut. In certain professions, it is also a creative mode of [removed]e.g. theatre, cabaret, etc.).

Also, makeup by definition literally just means cosmetics applied to the body.

Side: Disagree
Harvard(666) Disputed
5 points

---

For clarification:

[1] "Natural appearance" refers to one's entire body being unaltered by external sources.

"Application of makeup" means the act of putting on makeup so as to cover up the defects on one's face; or, to increase one's perceived attractiveness.

I AM NOT referring to those wearing makeup for mandatory purposes (e.g. it's a job requirement, such as a magazine model).

Additionally, I am NOT referring to those who wear makeup for exclusively 'stylish' purposes (albeit rare).

---

Actually, makeup by definition means: cosmetics such as lipstick or powder applied to the face, used to enhance or alter the appearance.

The semantic roots of Mascara literally means to mask.

Makeup is utilized to cover-up self-perceived flaws. I noted that it can be used for ceremonial purposes, without it functioning to cover-up insecurity; notwithstanding, makeup is not comparable to clothing--a legal necessity (we can discuss how wearing certain clothes (e.g. designer) may imply insecurity, but in another debate).

Getting a haircut could also imply insecurity, though, if done for aesthetic gain. If one has to alter and enhance their natural appearance with external sources for aesthetic gain, it must be because their natural appearance was not 'good enough'. Since they believe their appearance is not 'good enough' then they are not confident with their natural appearance, hence insecure.

I might also suggest that you look at a few makeup advertisements, as you will see the way beauty products--just look at the genius marketing right there, ha "beauty products"--are marketed, which is mainly to instill in the consumer the belief that using their products will make them beautiful; or if they already are, it's meant to enhance it so that the consumer can get that look that they've always wanted. That's the makeup markets goal: To conflate beauty with makeup so that one feels that they are inadequate or not at their true potential if they are not wearing makeup.

This dialogue may advance to the evolution of makeup and how it led to general insecurity, nevertheless my position stands.

Side: Agree
Jace(5149) Disputed
1 point

Well, if you artificially define wearing makeup so as to exclude anything but insecurity motives then of course the affirmation must follow. This is not only begging the question, however, but does not even follow from your own definition which identifies no express motive since it fails to indicate whether the perceived defect or lack of attractiveness is actually internalized.

Dismissing the comparison to clothing on the sole basis of the general illegality of nudity is a premature dismissal, because you are presuming that the predominant reason people wear clothing is because it is legally required. Yet, given the diversity of clothing beyond even designer brand as well as its critical role in signalling class and social status we cannot reliably make that conclusion, and it is just as premature to assume it is due to insecurity.

Your argument about getting a haircut representing insecurity is just as fallaciously presumptive as your stance on makeup. Just because it is an option does not make it the option, for either hairstyle or makeup.

Again, while advertising conflates beauty with makeup this does not prove that the message is actually internalized. You are still presuming the motive, this time based upon external messaging which proves nothing about internal self-attitude.

Your position does not stand, because you have not proven it at all. Reiterating your assumption does not make it less assumptive. I will also note with you, as with others, that even a minority of exceptions to the insecurity motive contradicts your stance because it means that makeup does not imply insecurity as a categorical absolute (the standard implied by "by definition").

Side: Disagree
arteaga34(130) Disputed
3 points

Makeup may be used to deal with personal insecurities, but that is hardly its sole function

If the sole function of makeup is not to deal with personal insecurities, then what is its function?

At its most basic, it is just the same as wearing clothes or getting your hair cut

Although the style of one's clothing attire and haircut can be, and many times is, attributed to alleviating personal insecurities, wearing clothes and cutting your hair are both a bit different from makeup. Wearing clothes are both associated with personal lifestyle choices which may need to be seen as reputable for specific situations such as: securing a job, being judged in a courtroom for an alleged crime, etc.

Also, makeup by definition literally just means cosmetics applied to the body.

I'll take your word for the definition of makeup, however, this might make it a bit more clear.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/cosmetic

Side: Agree
Jace(5149) Disputed
1 point

Personal aesthetic, creative personal expression, professional occupation, etc. Entirely like clothes and hairstyle, makeup is also associated with personal lifestyle choices which may be required to be seen as reputable for specific situations such securing a job, standing trial, etc.

Side: Disagree
mykebee34(119) Disputed
1 point

True; but whats the definition for cosmetic? Make-up in my opinion should be used in the entertainment business only. When being used for recreational purposes is it not to enhance whatever area it is applied to. Now, depending on the amount of make-used i do accept for example - eyeliner and light blush and some gloss i guess or lipstick. Now what tends to happen in a lot of urban and busy city life people over- do things and that's when the issue becomes questionable.

Side: Agree
Jace(5149) Disputed
1 point

Surely you can look up basic definitions for yourself. I also do not care about your unfounded, arbitrary, and vague sensibilities about when makeup is or is not acceptable. It is not only irrelevant to the question at hand, but completely uninteresting.

Side: Disagree
1 point

On TV, make-up is something that's essential to telling a story. Because of this, the wearing of make-up in real life deserves to be evaluated along shades of grey (pardon the pun).

Star Wars, the Halloween franchise, Artificial Intelligence, The Terminator, Casper, these movies all have make-up to inspire and emotionally gratify their audiences.

Side: Disagree
arteaga34(130) Disputed
1 point

If you're argument is that make-up is used by women to tell a story or to portray a feeling of emotion that the wearer is having, then I disagree. There is a minority of cases where this may be true, just like the one stated in the OP. However, this only reflects a minority of make-up users.

Make-up was created to make the wearer appear more aesthetically pleasing in an attempt to increase the probability of finding a suitable mate for that user. The majority of women who choose to wear make-up aim for the same look most every time they apply it and in return, expect the same response towards whomever they desire attraction from. The very fact that make-up users wear make-up in an attempt to appear more attractive to whomever they desire lust from implies that the depiction of which they hold for themselves with no make-up involved is unsatisfactory, or is at least subjected to improvement which therefore, implies a mild to substantial state of insecurity.

Side: Agree
Mariel33(456) Clarified
1 point

Is it possible that make-up is perfectly fine, but is only turned negative by how people function as a whole - i.e nations and money?

Side: Agree
1 point

Makeup has nothing to do with insecurity.

Women can be insecure of many things, their face being just one.

Only men say this as well as some ignorant feminists who clearly don't comprehend their own gender very well.

Make-up is actually what everyone who is artistic would rather be wearing on halloween rather than some cheap mask they picked up from the local store. Similarly, women who enjoy putting on make-up and who do so we are if anything overly secure in their ability to do so and enjoy showing it off.

It is rather like saying that wearing deodorant means one is insecure about their body odor, well yes, the plain face and the natural odor of sweat are not going to be as appealing as their chemically blended forms. On the other hand, some men plaster far too much cologne while some do it just right and smell godly, similarly with women and their makeup.

Overdoing implies specific insecurity with the look of the women but to do it well on a regular basis and feel no shame in hiding one's face for the sake of showing off one's talent at makeup acutely increases many females' self esteem.

Side: Disagree
arteaga34(130) Disputed
3 points

Yeah, I think it's established that there are exceptions to wearing make-up in which the minority of its users partake in, (Halloween, self-portraying emotions, rituals etc.) however, this is simply not the reason for the majority of make-up users. Women who participate in the daily usage of make-up do not take time to apply substance on to their face, every single day, in an effort to make themselves appear less aesthetically pleasing; I think that's something we can agree on. The fact that the purpose of make-up (in the mainstream usage of it at least) is to increase the physical attractiveness of the person wearing it implies that the user's self-depiction of themselves resembles unsatisfactory physical appeal, or is at least subjected to improvement. This is in fact, at the very least, a mild form of insecurity.

Deodorant is not exactly the same, as bad bodily odors may be associated with a lack of hygiene as well as bad life-style choices and so on.

Side: Agree
instig8or(3308) Disputed
1 point

No, the minority wear it because they genuinely overcompensate for their looks and end up looking worse than without it. If they look better with it that's not insecurity that's being good at self-inflicted art and showing it off.

Side: Disagree
1 point

It should be recognized that, to a greater or lesser extent everyone feels a degree of insecurity from time time, if not all of the time. In this context most everyone, men and women try to accentuate their good points and to ''beautify'' themselves. Cosmetics help to emphasize those features which the female wishes to be noticed thus drawing attention away from the parts of their dial they feel are uncomplimentary. Lip stick makes the lips more alluring, ( and kissable ), and mascara enhances the eyes. Other make up products can conceal skin blemishes, while hair dye can eliminate the appearance of grey hairs. Men shave and many of them apply a fragrance to their ugly mugs, afterwards. Even those pseudo macho men who have the proverbial 'designer growth'' are sure to shave parts of their face so they don't look like unwashed vagrants, in fact such types probably spend more time titivating their facial growth than the guy who quickly slides a blade over his whiskers. The whole point of make up and a pride in one's appearance usually is to be, or at least to feel attractive to others which in turn produces a ''feel good'' factor with the ensuing increase in confidence. Now, would anyone seriously suggest that there is anything wrong with such an activity.

Side: Disagree
mykebee34(119) Clarified
1 point

I dont think the poster is saying wearing make -up is wrong. Simply putting it, im assuming the point being conveyed in this particular case is the "purpose" of wearing make -up on a daily basis - is it vanity or an expression of ones uniqueness.

People with insecurities usually try to cover them up

make -up covers up blemishes and evens skin tones and "enhances" correct - so tell me what other purpose does wearing make -up on a regular basis serve other than to make one appear more attractive? I love how everyone is insinuating that only women wear make -up.

Side: Agree