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Debate Info

6
3
No yes
Debate Score:9
Arguments:8
Total Votes:10
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Argument Ratio

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 No (5)
 
 yes (3)

Debate Creator

Daegonius(331) pic



Should parents be allowed to force their children to practice a religion?

No

Side Score: 6
VS.

yes

Side Score: 3
2 points

I consider parents who immerse their kids into fundamental religion to be guilty of emotional and psychological child abuse. It should not be allowed. It is borderline criminal. Most schizophrenics as well as serial killers were raised by a religious zealot.

Cheers.

Side: No
Rick_Zeta5A(357) Disputed
1 point

Unfortunately I’d like to be on your side but just think for a minute. Who gets to decide what ideas are illegal to teach? How do you enforce these laws, do we go directly into homes and remove the parents? Who will pay for all these people who can’t have parents because of their beliefs? What happens when your views are in the crosshairs of this law, do you stop teaching what you believe to capitulate or risk your stability and happiness for an idea?

I think you can see it’s a slippery slope to start labeling ideals illegal.

Side: yes
LRyuuzaki(51) Disputed
1 point

@Rick_Zeta5A

It's not that practicing a religion should be illegal, or even teaching kids about a particular religion in the hopes they will practice it. What shouldn't be allowed is FORCING kids to practice a religion or placing them in an echo chamber where they only learn a particular version of reality based around your superstitious beliefs.

For example they would be allowed to read them the bible, teach them creationism, take them to church at a young age, but you can't punish them for choosing atheism or some other religion and you can't force them to practice your faith and you can't shelter them from real science or other religions, that should be considered child abuse.

Side: No
1 point

How else are they going to keep their churches full? Given CHOICE, the flock will drift away and REAL knowledge will take over. Too many of those forced followings are not "taking", enter the Religious Right and the attempt to force a NATION to "practice their teachings".

I recommend "The Religious Right - The Greatest Threat to Democracy" downloadable from Amazon for $2.99., written by a previous "follower". Can't force the kids? Force the nation .. with a RW SCOTUS and a new Constitution based on the Bible. Jews, Muslims, Mormons, Buddhists, etc. , pack it in .. ye must be born again .... whether you like it, or not!

Side: No
1 point

Hello N:

I dunno what you mean by "force".. They can't use physical force. Other than that, in this great nation of ours, parents are FREE to practice any religion they choose, and practice it any way they like...

excon

Side: yes
Daegonius(331) Disputed
1 point

@stupid excon

They can't use physical force.

Yes they can, they can force their kids to go to church or spank them if they don't praise the lord.

parents are FREE to practice any religion they choose, and practice it any way they like...

Which includes indoctrinating their children and using threats, intimidation and violence if they don't conform (i.e spanking, "you won't get any supper tonight if you don't say grace" etc.)

Side: No

If you follow the argument to it’s conclusion, the question becomes can an organization tout pervasive devisive language to indoctrinate children throughout their young life, in an expectation that those children will pledge devout solidarity to said organization, thereby completing propagation. And the answer will always be yes, because this definition encompasses all teachings about anything. A debate perhaps on whether or not sick individuals could be allowed to teach children to murder or martyr themselves for an organization. Still the overwhelming decision seems to be yes on an international scale.

Side: yes
seanB(959) Disputed
1 point

Not a great point to be honest. "They can" and "they ought to be able to" are two separate things, and I believe the question began with "should".

Moreso, I think you're severely overstretching the boundaries inherent in the contextual definitions within the question, to say that a debate surrounding the morality of forced indoctrination into a religion can be logically extrapolated into a debate about the morality of every teaching about anything whatsoever. There is a fundamental difference between teaching children, say, mathematical methodology which can be tested and applied to the real world with confirming results, and teaching a child that if they don't go to church they will burn in fiery torment for all eternity.

They're two completely different things. One is effectively morally inconsequential and the other is morally corrupt, deceitful, abusive and insidious.

Side: No