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Debate Info

21
19
NO! YES!
Debate Score:40
Arguments:20
Total Votes:51
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Argument Ratio

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 NO! (12)
 
 YES! (8)

Debate Creator

munster(49) pic



Should people be aloud to protest at military funerals?

NO!

Side Score: 21
VS.

YES!

Side Score: 19
4 points

Just like you can't yell FIRE! in a crowded theater, those people are being emotionally abusive to the mourning family with really stupid shit when a person is at their most vunerable emtional state.

Just because you are across the street in a non-residential area should not protect such abuse of the first admendment. If your crazy fucked-up nieghbor was making noise at any hour of the day - disturbing the quiet enjoyment of your residence - they can be cited or arrested. These freaks are taking advantage of a loop hole of not being in a "residential area". -

The dead's final resting place is being disrupted. Maybe no respect for the dead is legal but emotional abuse should be taken into consideration.

Physical abuse is illegal but emotional abuse is not - although can be used in a divorce.

Reference link is wiki Nazi parade in a Jewish nieghborhood legal challenge (Nazi's won)

Kinda like the Park Phreak yelling at the tree for hours - not threatening anybody directly but being a compl;ete asshole apears to be a right in America.

Supporting Evidence: National_Socialist_Party_of_America_v._Village_of_Skokie (secure.wikimedia.org)
Side: No!
3 points

OK tell me this, does is make sense for somebody to protest a funeral when that soldier fought for them to stand on American soil and be safe? NO if you said yes to this arguement then your retarded for real, I dont care what the amendments say about something like this, protesting at a regular funeral is one thing but to protest at someones funeral who gave you freedom, independence, justice and liberty is sick in the head, I would like to see some of these pussy fags go on the frontline and fight for this country and protest at their funerals and see what their families would say! Our SOLDIERS give us freedom not the dumbass president or the congress or the senate, people its common sense think about it!!!!!!!!!

Side: No!
2 points

I am torn on this one. I believe in free speech, but I also think that someone should not be allowed to interupt something as sacred as a funeral whether military or not. I think they should put limits on how far protesters can stand from a church and cemetery.

So I am a no and a yes on this one....haha

Side: No!
2 points

are you kidding of course you shouldn't there are grieving families over their loved one people need to respect that. there are plenty of places to protest but at a funeral isn't the place

Side: No!
2 points

Funerals are private and meant to be kept private. Outsiders aren't allowed into private services.

Side: No!

It is irrational to harass the family of a fallen soldier, they did nothing. What if the soldier was a conscripted youth? Was it their choice to go to war? No. Those who protest at a military funeral are inconsiderate fools. If people were to backlash and protest their intentions at one of their family or friends funerals they would more likely than not become rather angered.

Do not do onto others what you would not have done onto you.

Side: No!
1 point

Of course not! No matter what point people want to make, surely they understand that protesting at a funeral is one of the most disrespectful things one can do! How can someone even think about insulting the dead and their mourning families like that?

Those protesters might as well walk up to the widow(er)s and say: "I find voicing my opinion more important than your loss right now"

Side: No!

I don't think anyone should be allowed to protest at any kind of a funeral.

Side: NO!
2 points

The First Amendment was put their for a reason. As Ron Paul said "It wasn't made so that we can talk about the weather, it was put there so that we can say very controversial things".

Side: Yes!
monkeyboy142(76) Disputed
2 points

But this is not controversial, its a PRIVATE funeral not open to the public screaming.

Side: No!
ThePyg(6737) Disputed
1 point

Well, you didn't give me much to work with, but from what I remember they did not actually go into the funeral, the protesting took place in public areas.

Side: Yes!
sayyad99(773) Disputed
1 point

The United States Supreme Court recently ruled that a group of people can protest at a funeral because it is part of their constitutional rights regardless of the fact that the parties involved may be private. If the group that is protesting stays within the confines of the present statute in the state, then no action can be taken from the party who is being protested. And to answer your question, if the protestors stays within a reasonable distance away from the actual funeral scene and obeys the laws, then they are not liable for civil lawsuits because they are to the full extent exercising their 1st amendment rights.

Side: Yes!

If it is a private ceremony on private property such as a church, then no, but if it is a public ceremony on public property, then yes, this is one of the consequences of having public property. Even if private property, they are entitled to protest outside the boundary, this is called free speech. This is no different if someone came into my house, and protested because one, it is breaking and entering, and it is private property, I can tell them to leave.

Side: Yes!

Well they shouldn't, they should be allowed.

Else, what did the soldier die for?

Side: Yes!
monkeyboy142(76) Disputed
0 points

They also fought for the right for the law disturbing the peace too .

Side: No!
1 point

The difficult part of this argument is that if we begin to abridge the exercise of free speech; when does it stop? As a member of the Armed Forces, a veteran of both Afghanistan and Iraq I do not agree with the protesting of any service member's funeral. To protest or celebrate the death of anyone is simply tasteless. I believe the constitution is quite clear though that the exercise of free speech is not to be abridged. When we venture down the road and being to make exceptions simply because we disagree with what a person or group is saying it turns into the proverbial slippery slope.

That said; being that they have a right to protest in a public forum, I am also entitled to give them public a$$ kicking.

Side: Yes!
0 points

As long as the funeral is not private, they can. And, even if it is private, they can do it right outside the graveyard or wherever the funeral mght be taking place.

Side: Yes!